Einstein’s latest anniversary marks the birth of modern cosmology    

1917 paper introduced infamous cosmological constant in equation describing gravity

Context
Andromeda galaxy

Edwin Hubble’s observations of stars in the Andromeda galaxy (shown) demonstrated that the universe was vastly bigger than Albert Einstein realized. Nevertheless, Einstein’s paper applying his general theory of relativity, published a century ago, became the foundation for the modern science of cosmology.

First of two parts

Sometimes it seems like every year offers an occasion to celebrate some sort of Einstein anniversary.

In 2015, everybody lauded the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity. Last year, scientists celebrated the centennial of his prediction of gravitational waves — by reporting the discovery of gravitational waves. And this year marks the centennial of Einstein’s paper establishing the birth of modern cosmology.

Before Einstein, cosmology was not very modern at all. Most scientists shunned it. It was regarded as a matter for philosophers or possibly theologians. You could do cosmology without even knowing any math.

But Einstein showed how the math of general relativity could be applied to the task of describing the cosmos. His theory offered a way to study cosmology precisely, with a firm physical and mathematical basis. Einstein provided the recipe for transforming cosmology from speculation to a field of scientific study.

“There is little doubt that Einstein’s 1917 paper … set the foundations of modern theoretical cosmology,” Irish physicist Cormac O’Raifeartaigh and colleagues write in a new analysis of that paper. 

Einstein had pondered the implications of his new theory for cosmology even before he had finished it. General relativity was, after all, a theory of space and time — all of it. Einstein’s showed that gravity — the driving force sculpting the cosmic architecture — was simply the distortion of spacetime geometry generated by the presence of mass and energy. (He constructed an equation to show how spacetime geometry, on the left side of the equation, was determined by the density of mass-energy, the right side.) Since spacetime and mass-energy account for basically everything, the entire cosmos ought to behave as general relativity’s equation required.

Newton’s law of gravity had posed problems in that regard. If every mass attracted every other mass, as Newton had proclaimed, then all the matter in the universe ought to have just collapsed itself into one big blob. Newton suggested that the universe was infinite, filled with matter, so that attraction inward was balanced by the attraction of matter farther out. Nobody really bought that explanation, though. For one thing, it required a really precise arrangement: One star out of place, and the balance of attractions disappears and the universe collapses. It also required an infinity of stars, making it impossible to explain why it’s dark at night. (There would be a star out there along every line of sight at all times.)

Einstein hoped his theory of gravity would resolve the cosmic paradoxes of Newtonian gravity. So in early 1917, less than a year after his complete paper on the general theory was published, he delivered a short paper to the Prussian Academy of Sciences outlining the implications of his theory for cosmology.

In that paper, titled “Cosmological Considerations in the General Theory of Relativity,” he started by noting the problems posed by using Newton’s gravity to describe the universe. Einstein showed that Newton’s gravity would require a finite island of stars sitting in an infinite space. But over time such a collection of stars would evaporate. That problem could be avoided, though, if the universe turned out not to be infinite. Instead, Einstein said, everything would be fine if the universe is finite. Big, sure, but curved in such a way that it closed on itself, like a sphere.

Einstein’s mathematical challenge was to show that such a finite cosmic spacetime would be static and stable. (In those days nobody knew that the universe was expanding.) He assumed that on a large enough scale, the distribution of matter in this universe could be considered uniform. (Einstein said it was like viewing the Earth as a smooth sphere for most purposes, even though its terrain is full of complexities on smaller distance scales.) Matter’s effect on spacetime curvature would therefore be pretty much constant, and the universe’s overall condition would be unchanging.

All this made sense to Einstein because he had a limited view of what was actually going on in the cosmos. Like many scientists in those days, he believed the universe was basically just the Milky Way galaxy. All the known stars moved fairly slowly, consistent with his belief in a spherical cosmos with uniformly distributed mass. Unfortunately, general relativity’s math didn’t work if that was the case — it suggested the universe would not be stable. Einstein realized, though, that his view of the static spherical universe would succeed if he added a term to his original equation.

In fact, there were good reasons to include the term anyway. O’Raifeartaigh and colleagues point out that in his earlier work on general relativity, Einstein remarked in a footnote that his equation technically permitted the inclusion of an additional term. That didn’t seem to matter at the time. But in his cosmology paper, Einstein found that it was just the thing his equation needed to describe the universe properly (as Einstein then supposed the universe to be). So he added that factor, designated by the Greek letter lambda, to the left-hand side of his basic general relativity equation.

“That term is necessary only for the purpose of making possible a quasi-static distribution of matter, as required by the fact of the small velocities of the stars,” Einstein wrote in his 1917 paper. As long as the magnitude of this new term on the geometry side of the equation was small enough, it would not alter the theory’s predictions for planetary motions in the solar system.

Einstein’s 1917 paper demonstrated the mathematical effectiveness of lambda (also called the “cosmological constant”) but did not say much about its physical interpretation. In another paper, published in 1918, he commented that lambda represented a negative mass density — it played “the role of gravitating negative masses which are distributed all over the interstellar space.” Negative mass would counter the attractive gravity and prevent all the matter in Einstein’s spherical finite universe from collapsing.

As everybody now knows, though, there is no danger of collapse, because the universe is not static to begin with, but rather is rapidly expanding. After Edwin Hubble had established such expansion, Einstein abandoned lambda as unnecessary (or at least, set it equal to zero in his equation). Others built on Einstein’s foundation to derive the math needed to make sense of Hubble’s discovery, eventually leading to the modern view of an expanding universe initiated by a Big Bang explosion.

But in the 1990s, astronomers discovered that the universe is not only expanding, it is expanding at an accelerating rate. Such acceleration requires a mysterious driving force, nicknamed “dark energy,” exerting negative pressure in space. Many experts believe Einstein’s cosmological constant, now interpreted as a constant amount of energy with negative pressure infusing all of space, is the dark energy’s true identity.

Einstein might not have been surprised by all of this. He realized that only time would tell whether his lambda would vanish to zero or play a role in the motions of the heavens. As he wrote in 1917 to the Dutch physicist-astronomer Willem de Sitter: “One day, our actual knowledge of the composition of the fixed-star sky, the apparent motions of fixed stars, and the position of spectral lines as a function of distance, will probably have come far enough for us to be able to decide empirically the question of whether or not lambda vanishes.”

Follow me on Twitter: @tom_siegfried


          A new ‘Einstein’ equation suggests wormholes hold key to quantum gravity   

ER=EPR summarizes new clues to understanding entanglement and spacetime

Context
illustration of a wormhole

Wormholes, tunnels through the fabric of spacetime that connect widely separated locations, are predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Some physicists think that wormholes could connect black holes in space, possibly providing a clue to the mysteries of quantum entanglement and how to merge general relativity with quantum mechanics.

There’s a new equation floating around the world of physics these days that would make Einstein proud.

It’s pretty easy to remember: ER=EPR.

You might suspect that to make this equation work, P must be equal to 1. But the symbols in this equation stand not for numbers, but for names. E, you probably guessed, stands for Einstein. R and P are initials — for collaborators on two of Einstein’s most intriguing papers. Combined in this equation, these letters express a possible path to reconciling Einstein’s general relativity with quantum mechanics.

Quantum mechanics and general relativity are both spectacularly successful theories. Both predict bizarre phenomena that defy traditional conceptions of reality. Yet when put to the test, nature always complies with each theory’s requirements. Since both theories describe nature so well, it’s hard to explain why they’ve resisted all efforts to mathematically merge them. Somehow, everybody believes, they must fit together in the end. But so far nature has kept the form of their connection a secret.

ER=EPR, however, suggests that the key to their connection can be found in the spacetime tunnels known as wormholes. These tunnels, implied by Einstein’s general relativity, would be like subspace shortcuts physically linking distant locations. It seems that such tunnels may be the alter ego of the mysterious link between subatomic particles known as quantum entanglement.

For the last 90 years or so, physicists have pursued two main quantum issues separately: one, how to interpret the quantum math to make sense of its weirdness (such as entanglement), and two, how to marry quantum mechanics to gravity. It turns out, if ER=EPR is right, that both questions have the same answer: Quantum weirdness can be understood only if you understand its connection to gravity. Wormholes may forge that link.

Wormholes are technically known as Einstein-Rosen bridges (the “ER” part of the equation). Nathan Rosen collaborated with Einstein on a paper describing them in 1935. EPR refers to another paper Einstein published with Rosen in 1935, along with Boris Podolsky. That one articulated quantum entanglement’s paradoxical puzzles about the nature of reality. For decades nobody seriously considered the possibility that the two papers had anything to do with one another. But in 2013, physicists Juan Maldacena and Leonard Susskind proposed that in some sense, wormholes and entanglement describe the same thing.

In a recent paper, Susskind has spelled out some of the implications of this realization. Among them: understanding the wormhole-entanglement equality could be the key to merging quantum mechanics and general relativity, that details of the merger would explain the mystery of entanglement, that spacetime itself could emerge from quantum entanglement, and that the controversies over how to interpret quantum mechanics could be resolved in the process.

“ER=EPR tells us that the immensely complicated network of entangled subsystems that comprises the universe is also an immensely complicated (and technically complex) network of Einstein-Rosen bridges,” Susskind writes. “To me it seems obvious that if ER=EPR is true it is a very big deal, and it must affect the foundations and interpretation of quantum mechanics.”

Entanglement poses one of the biggest impediments to understanding quantum physics. It happens, for instance, when two particles are emitted from a common source. A quantum description of such a particle pair tells you the odds that a measurement of one of the particles (say, its spin) will give a particular result (say, counterclockwise). But once one member of the pair has been measured, you instantly know what the result will be when you make the same measurement on the other, no matter how far away it is. Einstein balked at this realization, insisting that a measurement at one place could not affect a distant experiment (invoking his famous condemnation of “spooky action at a distance”). But many actual experiments have confirmed entanglement’s power to defy Einstein’s preference. Even though (as Einstein insisted) no information can be sent instantaneously from one particle to another, one of them nevertheless seems to “know” what happened to its entangled partner.

Ordinarily, physicists speak of entanglement between two particles. But that’s just the simplest example. Susskind points out that quantum fields — the stuff that particles are made from — can also be entangled. “In the vacuum of a quantum field theory the quantum fields in disjoint regions of space are entangled,” he writes. It has to do with the well-known (if bizarre) appearance of “virtual” particles that constantly pop in and out of existence in the vacuum. These particles appear in pairs literally out of nowhere; their common origin ensures that they are entangled. In their brief lifetimes they sometimes collide with real particles, which then become entangled themselves.

Now suppose Alice and Bob, universally acknowledged to be the most capable quantum experimenters ever imagined, start collecting these real entangled particles in the vacuum. Alice takes one member of each pair and Bob takes the other. They fly away separately to distant realms of space and then each smushes their particles so densely that they become a black hole. Because of the entanglement these particles started with, Alice and Bob have now created two entangled black holes. If ER=EPR is right, a wormhole will link those black holes; entanglement, therefore, can be described using the geometry of wormholes. “This is a remarkable claim whose impact has yet to be appreciated,” Susskind writes.

Even more remarkable, he suggests, is the possibility that two entangled subatomic particles alone are themselves somehow connected by a sort of quantum wormhole. Since wormholes are contortions of spacetime geometry — described by Einstein’s gravitational equations — identifying them with quantum entanglement would forge a link between gravity and quantum mechanics.

In any event, these developments certainly emphasize the importance of entanglement for understanding reality. In particular, ER=EPR illuminates the contentious debates about how quantum mechanics should be interpreted. Standard quantum wisdom (the Copenhagen interpretation) emphasizes the role of an observer, who when making a measurement “collapses” multiple quantum possibilities into one definite result. But the competing Everett (or “many worlds”) interpretation says that the multiple possibilities all occur — any observer just happens to experience only one consistent branching chain of the multiple possible events.

In the Everett picture, collapse of the cloud of possibilities (the wave function) never happens. Interactions (that is, measurements) just cause the interacting entities to become entangled. Reality, then, becomes “a complicated network of entanglements.” In principle, all those entangling events could be reversed, so nothing ever actually collapses — or at least it would be misleading to say that the collapse is irreversible. Still, the standard view of irreversible collapse works pretty well in practice. It’s never feasible to undo the multitude of complex interactions that occur in real life. In other words, Susskind says, ER=EPR suggests that the two views of quantum reality are “complementary.”

Susskind goes on to explore in technical detail how entanglement functions with multiple participants and describes the implications for considering entanglement to be equivalent to a wormhole. It remains certain, for instance, that wormholes cannot be used to send a signal through space faster than light. Alice and Bob cannot, for instance, send messages to each other through the wormhole connecting their black holes. If they really want to talk, though, they could each jump into their black hole and meet in the middle of the wormhole. Such a meeting would provide strong confirmation for the ER=EPR idea, although Alice and Bob would have trouble getting their paper about it published.

In the meantime, a great many papers are appearing about ER=EPR and other work relating gravity — the geometry of spacetime — to quantum entanglement. In one recent paper, Caltech physicists ChunJun Cao, Sean M. Carroll and Spyridon Michalakis attempt to show how spacetime can be “built” from the vast network of quantum entanglement in the vacuum. “In this paper we take steps toward deriving the existence and properties of space itself from an intrinsically quantum description using entanglement,” they write. They show how changes in “quantum states” — the purely quantum descriptions of reality — can be linked to changes in spacetime geometry. “In this sense,” they say, “gravity appears to arise from quantum mechanics in a natural way.”

Cao, Carroll and Michalakis acknowledge that their approach remains incomplete, containing assumptions that will need to be verified later. “What we’ve done here is extremely preliminary and conjectural,” Carroll writes in a recent blog post. “We don’t have a full theory of anything, and even what we do have involves a great deal of speculating and not yet enough rigorous calculating.”

Nevertheless there is a clear sense among many physicists that a path to unifying quantum mechanics and gravity has apparently opened. If it’s the right path, Carroll notes, then it turns out not at all to be hard to get gravity from quantum mechanics — it’s “automatic.” And Susskind believes that the path to quantum gravity — through the wormhole — demonstrates that the unity of the two theories is deeper than scientists suspected. The implication of ER=EPR, he says, is that “quantum mechanics and gravity are far more tightly related than we (or at least I) had ever imagined.”

Follow me on Twitter: @tom_siegfried


          Estas obras de arte han sido creadas por una doble red neuronal y logran gustar más que las pintadas por humanos    

Cerebro

Dicen que hay relación entre la creatividad y la inteligencia, y puede que ésta sea otra cosa a comprobar con la artificial. Y la verdad es que resulta bastante curioso ver cómo se desarrolla y defiende esta especie de "creatividad artificial" si hablamos de una inteligencia artificial que es capaz de crear arte mezclando estilos pictóricos.

Dejando pinceles y óleos a un lado y tirando de algoritmos y redes neuronales, lo que han hecho unos investigadores de la Universidad Rutgers (Nueva Jersey) y el laboratorio de IA de Facebook e California es crear un sistema dual para crear obras de arte. Pero el objetivo no era que fuese algo aleatorio o fundamentado en lo abstracto, sino que el sistema fuese capaz de crear algo catalogado como arte sin corresponderse a ninguna corriente artística existente (barroco, cubismo, etc.).

Dos cerebros juntos piensan más que uno, y dos redes neuronales también

Según explican en el trabajo publicado, para la creación del sistema se ha partido de la modificación de un algoritmo llamado Generative Adversial Network (GAN), denominación que deja ver la base de su funcionamiento, dado que lo que hace es enfrentar dos redes neuronales con el fin de que esa confrontación de un resultado cada vez mejor. Los componentes de este curioso enfrentamiento son una red que crea una solución y otra que se encarga de evaluarla, siendo el algoritmo el catalizador para que una y otra red den con la solución más acertada.

Aplicándolo a la creación de arte, el equipo habla de una Creative Adversarial Network (CAN), y se trata de que una de las redes (la generadora) genere imágenes continuamente y otra (la discriminadora) se encargue de catalogarlo o no como arte, enviando dos señales contradictorias a la generadora para conseguir una creación nueva, no demasiado innovadora y no perteneciente a ningún estilo. La discriminadora puede juzgar gracias a haber recibido un entrenamiento con 81.449 pinturas de 1.119 artistas distintos (del siglo XV al XX), con lo que es capaz de discernir entre una obra de arte y otro elemento (como una fotografía o un diagrama) y el estilo al que pertenece.

Like Esta selección es la que más gustó al jurado humano.

De ahí que, como decíamos al principio, el objetivo sea que el sistema dé con una creación que no pueda catalogarse en ninguno de estos estilos, siendo en la práctica un nuevo estilo per se. Explica Marian Mazzone en New Scientist, historiadora de arte en el Colegio de Charleston en Carolina del Sur que ha trabajado en el proyecto, que la idea es crear arte que sea innovador pero no en exceso.

De este modo, lo que buscan estos investigadores es lograr una generación de arte artificial al 100%, de modo que no intervenga ningún ser humano en el proceso. Aunque como explican, igual que la creatividad humana en el arte parte de experiencias y conocimientos previos, y que la motivación para el estudio parte de la hipótesis de Colin Martindale (que fue profesor de psicología en la Universidad de Maine) de que las nuevas creaciones de arte surgen de un intento de romper con lo previo y mejorar, lo cual han querido computerizar usando este GAN modificado.

Artistas imprevisibles y sin pinceles

En cuanto a los resultados, los investigadores concluyen que hay una marcada ausencia de figuras, tendiendo más a un estilo abstracto y que probablemente se deba a esa mínima de no basarse en ningún género ya existente. Y lo interesante es que lo que hicieron es mostrar los trabajos en público, de modo que éste fuese el encargado de catalogarlo como arte, así como diferenciar una creación humana de una artificial.

Para este cara a cara (con trampa) escogieron obras abstractas expresionistas (creadas entre 1945 y 2017) y otro set de obras que se mostraron en el Art Basel 2016, buscando trabajos que destacasen en creatividad (siendo éste un evento de referencia en el arte contemporáneo), frente a las creadas por los sistemas artificiales. A los sujetos se les preguntó si pensaban que las obras habían sido creadas por un ser humano o por una máquina, qué nota le pondrían (por gusto) o si daban la impresión de corresponder a un artista novel o a uno con experiencia.

Lo que vieron es que se le daba más nota a las imágenes generadas por CAN que a las del Art Basel (aunque reñido, 53% frente a un 42%), aunque enfrentando las de CAN al conjunto de obras humanas éste quedaba un 9% por debajo (53% versus 62%).

Unlike La selección de obras creadas por la AI que menos gustó.
¿Pero entonces lo que crea una AI es arte? Según sus experimentos, estos investigadores así lo consideran

¿Pero entonces lo que crea una AI es arte? Con el fin de determinar esto realizaron otro test preguntando por la intencionalidad en la creación, si se veía una estructura, una inspiración o si sentían que la obra se comunicaba con ellos. Según los resultados, explican que los sujetos encontraron las imágenes generadas por CAN "intencionales, visualmente estructuradas, comunicativas e inspiradoras", con lo que creen que pueden considerarse arte.

Ante ojos ignorantes en este campo, la verdad es que las muestras que vemos pueden ser asumidas perfectamente como la creación de un ser humano. Eso sí, esta vez no tienen ese factor espeluznante como los retratos artificiales que seguían nuestro cursor que veíamos la semana pasada.

Información e imágenes | Arxiv, Freepik
En Xataka | Este algoritmo imita el estilo de los pintores más famosos y lo aplica a cualquier foto

También te recomendamos

¿Cómo entrenar a una plataforma de inteligencia artificial? Jugando a Pac-Man, claro

Ni Twitter ni Facebook ni Google, ¿cómo se lo montan los chinos en Internet?

Google ha creado un 'Paint con esteroides': IA para que los que no sabemos dibujar obtengamos resultados brillantes

-
La noticia Estas obras de arte han sido creadas por una doble red neuronal y logran gustar más que las pintadas por humanos fue publicada originalmente en Xataka por Anna Martí .


          Comment on Decoupling and the Bourgain-Demeter-Guth proof of the Vinogradov main conjecture by Anonymous   
Dear Prof. Tao, I'm currently studying the latest paper of Bourgain and Demeter on decoupling (https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.06032), but there is one issue I just don't understand. In the proof of Prop. 8.4 in order to apply Thm. 5.1 the authors claim that the Fourier transform of the function $latex (x,z)\mapsto E_{S_L}g(x,y,z)$ (let's call this function $latex E_{S_L,y}g)$ for fixed $latex y$ is supported in the $latex O(K^{-1})$ neighborhood of the parabola $latex \eta=\xi^2+1$. But for Thm. 5.1 I need that the Fourier support lies in the smaller set $latex N_{C/R}([0,1])$ for some constant $latex C>0$. My question is the following: How is the Fourier transform of $latex E_{S_L,y}g$ defined in order to give the author's claim above any sense? Since $latex E_{S_L,y}g$ does not lie in any $latex L^p$ space, the usual definition does not make sense, does it? If I consider $latex E_{S_L,y}g$ as a distribution, then I'm able to conclude that it has Fourier support (in the distributional sense) in $latex N_{C/R}([0,1])$. But that doesn't seem to help me when I want to apply Thm. 5.1. May I ask you to elaborate on this issue and explain how equation (21) in the above paper can be derived?
          "This station is now the ultimate power in the universe!"   
It's a Trap: Emperor Palpatine's Poison Pill by Zachary Feinstein [.PDF]
In this paper we study the financial repercussions of the destruction of two fully armed and operational moon-sized battle stations ("Death Stars") in a 4-year period and the dissolution of the galactic government in Star Wars. The emphasis of this work is to calibrate and simulate a model of the banking and financial systems within the galaxy. Along these lines, we measure the level of systemic risk that may have been generated by the death of Emperor Palpatine and the destruction of the second Death Star. We conclude by finding the economic resources the Rebel Alliance would need to have in reserve in order to prevent a financial crisis from gripping the galaxy through an optimally allocated banking bailout.
via: Popular Science
In this case study we found that the Rebel Alliance would need to prepare a bailout of at least 15%, and likely at least 20%, of GGP [Gross Galactic Product] in order to mitigate the systemic risks and the sudden and catastrophic economic collapse. Without such funds at the ready, it likely the Galactic economy would enter an economic depression of astronomical proportions.

          My new wheel   
Warning: This is a totally pic heavy post!  :)

I purchased a new spinning wheel on the 4th.  There was a tale of drama and frustration surrounding that, but now that it's done, it seems unimportant.
The drama culminated such that the whole drive (in awful traffic) out to pick up the wheel was fraught with me thinking (and occasionally saying out loud) that this wheel had better be worth it!

Well, when I got there and saw it, I decided it was.  It is a pretty cute, if slightly odd, wheel.

Here she sits next to 'Elaine', my 70s model Ashford Traditional wheel.  It's not that Elaine is huge, it's just that the little wheel is rather little.

I've gone back and forth between Brighid, Brigantia, and Holda.  All three are mythological figures associated with spinning - although in the first two cases the association is rather looser than in the third.

'Elaine' was named for Elaine of Astolat (the Lady of Shalot), the maiden who loved Lancelot du Lac in Arthurian legend. Although I'd posted on facebook and ravelry that I'd decided on Brighid as the name of the little wheel, I've changed my mind and she will henceforth be known as Holda.  Holda is the germanic patroness of spinning.  The Brothers Grimm have a story about her called 'Frau Holle'.  So, this is my new wheel, named 'Holda'.  It's a more appropriate name than Brighid, as the wheel is undeniably german.  After posting pictures of the wheel all over Ravelry, I came across another Raveler who owns, by chance, the same wheel.  Hers came slightly less complete than mine, but it did come with the original instructions, which was useful.  As best as she was able to figure out, the wheel was manufactured as a kit in the 1980s by a German furniture company.  There are enough oddities about the wheel that it's pretty clear the wheel was not made by a spinner.

The wheel itself is wonderful lightweight.  She will be amazing for taking out to spin-ins.  She weighs a very light 10lbs has a very small profile.  Her flywheel is only 12.5" diameter.

The strangest thing about the wheel is the distaff.  In it's current placement, it's unusable.  It sits about 6" behind the flyer.  That's not a practical position for spinning of any type.  However, it is not a permanent fixture.  It can be easily removed and held while spinning.  I've tied a mohair and wool blend batt onto the distaff and have been spinning from it.  I have to say, it makes spinning infinitely easier!  Although I generally get a nice even thread while spinning, using the distaff seems to make that evenness pretty effortless.


It's a double drive wheel, meaning that the driveband goes around the flyer and the bobbin.  I've never spun on a double drive wheel before, so figuring out the tensioning was a bit unusual.  In the picture above, you can see the wooden knob on the rear maiden.  The upper part of the assembly unscrews, and then the lower part screws up to tighten everything up.  This pulls the flyer assembly up, which tightens the tension.

The flyer goes right through the front maiden, instead of having a separate bearing attached to the maiden.  That means in order to remove the flyer, the whole maiden has to be loosened and pulled back.  It's not a big deal, though.  There is only one bobbin, so until I get more bobbins made (or find more), I won't need to worry much about switching them out.

The flyer itself is also slightly odd, having only 4 hooks.  The top hook does not align with the end of the bobbin, either.  This is an easy fix.  I plan to remove the hooks, fill the flyer with wood filler, and put in 6 hooks, evenly spaced.


The treadle was a little clunky at first, but that was a veyr easy fix.  There were a few problems there.  First was that the conrod, the twine that attaches the footman to the treadle, was way too loose.  I cut it off (it was knotted too tightly for me to untie it) and replaced it with new twine.  I am going to get a thin leather strip to replace the twine, but for now, it's much better. 

The second problem was that the footman was apparently missing something to hold it securely to the crank on the wheel.  According to the diagram provided by my fellow raveler, there should be a small wooden bead there.  Not having a bead of the right size handy at the moment, I stuck a hair elastic on in it's place.  Totally solved the clunky treadle issue.

I have great plans for this wheel.  She will definitely be my primary summer wheel.  I plan to take Elaine apart to refinish her in a lovely red mahogany stain.  Re-finishing Elaine will take me the better part of the summer.  But after Elaine is done, it will be Holda's turn.  I am going to strip her right down and remove the current finish.  I'll be refinishing her in a very dark chestnut colour.  It's likely I will paint some small designs around the wheel and treadle.  My husband is going to cut and drill an arm for the distaff to pull it out in front of the flyer.  There is a fancy little decorative tip missing on top of the front maiden.  It serve no purpose, but I am going to pour a resin bead to put in there - I will probably put a small decal of a woman spinning in the bead.  The front of the wheel needs a small attachment to make it mroe secure.  Again, I will form this from poured resin.  When she is done, she is going to be a thing of beauty to behold!

I'll keep you updated.

          Thermal Control of a Dual Mode Parametric Sapphire Transducer   
Belfi, Jacopo and Beverini, Nicolò and Michele, Andrea De and Gabbriellini, Gianluca and Mango, Francesco and Passaquieti, Roberto (2009) Thermal Control of a Dual Mode Parametric Sapphire Transducer. arXiv .
          Thermal monopoles and selfdual dyons in the Quark-Gluon Plasma   
Chernodub, M. N. and D'Alessandro, A. and D'Elia, M. and Zakharov, V. I. (2009) Thermal monopoles and selfdual dyons in the Quark-Gluon Plasma. arXiv .
          Molecular vibrational cooling by Optical Pumping with shaped femtosecond pulses   
Sofikitis, Dimitris and Weber, Sebastien and Fioretti, Andréa and Horchani, Ridha and Allegrini, Maria and Chatel, Béatrice and Comparat, Daniel and Pillet, Pierre (2009) Molecular vibrational cooling by Optical Pumping with shaped femtosecond pulses. arXiv .
          On some rescaled shape optimization problems   
Buttazzo, Giuseppe and Wagner, Alfred (2009) On some rescaled shape optimization problems. arXiv .
          On the characterization of the compact embedding of Sobolev spaces   
Bucur, D. and Buttazzo, G. (2009) On the characterization of the compact embedding of Sobolev spaces. arXiv .
          Overdetermined boundary value problems for the $\infty$-Laplacian   
Buttazzo, G. and Kawohl, B. (2009) Overdetermined boundary value problems for the $\infty$-Laplacian. arXiv .
          Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in periodic potentials   
Zenesini, A. and Lignier, H. and Tayebirad, G. and Radogostowicz, J. and Ciampini, D. and Mannella, R. and Wimberger, S. and Morsch, O. and Arimondo, E. (2009) Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in periodic potentials. arXiv . (In Press)
          Stochastic webs and quantum transport in superlattices: an introductory review   
Soskin, S. M. and McClintock, P. V. E. and Fromhold, T. M. and Khovanov, I. A. and Mannella, R. (2009) Stochastic webs and quantum transport in superlattices: an introductory review. arXiv . (Submitted)
          Maximal width of the separatrix chaotic layer   
Soskin, S. M. and Mannella, R. (2009) Maximal width of the separatrix chaotic layer. arXiv .
          Quantum chaos in an electron-phonon bad metal   
arXiv:1705.07895

by: Werman, Yochai
Abstract:
We calculate the scrambling rate $\lambda_L$ and the butterfly velocity $v_B$ associated with the growth of quantum chaos for a solvable large-$N$ electron-phonon system. We study a temperature regime in which the electrical resistivity of this system exceeds the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit and increases linearly with temperature - a sign that there are no long-lived charged quasiparticles - although the phonons remain well-defined quasiparticles. The long-lived phonons determine $\lambda_L$, rendering it parametrically smaller than the theoretical upper-bound $\lambda_L \ll \lambda_{max}=2\pi T/\hbar$. Significantly, the chaos properties seem to be intrinsic - $\lambda_L$ and $v_B$ are the same for electronic and phononic operators. We consider two models - one in which the phonons are dispersive, and one in which they are dispersionless. In either case, we find that $\lambda_L$ is proportional to the inverse phonon lifetime, and $v_B$ is proportional to the effective phonon velocity. The thermal and chaos diffusion constants, $D_E$ and $D_L\equiv v_B^2/\lambda_L$, are always comparable, $D_E \sim D_L$. In the dispersive phonon case, the charge diffusion constant $D_C$ satisfies $D_L\gg D_C$, while in the dispersionless case $D_L \ll D_C$.
          Electron-nucleus scalar-pseudoscalar interaction in PbF: Z-vector study in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework   
arXiv:1706.09221

by: Sasmal, Sudip
Abstract:
The scalar-pseudoscalar interaction constant of PbF in its ground state electronic configuration is calculated using the Z-vector method in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework. The precise calculated value is very important to set upper bound limit on P,T-odd scalar-pseudoscalar interaction constant, k_s, from the experimentally observed P,T-odd frequency shift. Further, the ratio of the effective electric field to the scalar-pseudoscalar interaction constant is also calculated which is required to get an independent upper bound limit of electric dipole moment of electron, d_e, and k_s and how these (d_e and k_s) are interrelated is also presented here.
          A una comissaria de policia...(part 1)   


Preparant el terreny per a la porositat: no caldria però com que aquests temes són delicats i moltes persones tenen la pell molt fina, ho dic: de bons i bones professionals hi ha a tots els àmbits, és a dir persones que es creuen la seva feina, són bons professionals i habitualment aquest aspecte està vinculat a ser també persones íntegres, autèntiques amb uns valors humans i una ètica personal, és a dir que fan la seva feina el millor possible i una mica més...acostumen a tenir bona capacitat d’introspecció i capacitat d’autocrítica, i tenen iniciativa, creativitat, perseverança, no es conformen i ho deixen estar davant el primer obstacle que se’ls posa davant i busquen les mil alternatives per aconseguir arribar a l’objectiu: preservar la integritat, garantir la protecció i defensar els drets de les víctimes del delicte, tal com diu Graciela B.Ferreira "detectar una dona en situació de violència és un compromís ètic, acompanyar-la en la recerca d'una solució resulta una tasca delicada i rellevant, donar-li una millor atenció fa pròpia una causa transformadora, participar en la restitució de la seva llibertat i els seus drets humans". Fins i tot aquests/es professionals responsables estan disposats/des a desobeïr si es té com a fita aquesta gran cita de la Graciela.



Ja fa uns 5 anys aproximadament que constato des del meu lloc de treball una davallada en la qualitat de l'atenció policial especialment en els casos de violència de gènere, ja sigui en la primera acollida a comissaria com les intervencions als domicilis. És curiós que tot coïncideix amb un canvi polític conservador a l'Estat i al principat..., amb unes retallades ferotges, i canvis en els plans d'igualtat, protocols i en les funcions dels Grups d'Atenció a la Víctima dels Mossos d'Esquadra... 

I podeu dir, i no ve d'abans? Doncs segurament però no tan pronunciat...hi ha una inèrcia instaurada i d’aquí el motiu del post, malauradament massa quotidiana perquè la meva memòria ho retingui i persisteixi al llarg del temps...una inèrcia instaurada i relacionada directament amb el burn-out, “el quemazón” que he detectat en les diferents formacions de reciclatge que he impartit jo mateix com a formador en matèria de violència masclista aquests darrers 10 anys a molts professionals (centenars...) dels cossos de seguretat pública, i sóc plenament conscient i no tinc cap problema en reconèixer que tenen una feina dura i complicada (com la meva i tantes altres professions relacionades amb el món de la salut, de l’educació social, de la mineria...) que en moltes ocasions traspassa l’àmbit personal i això acaba fent un dany,...d’aquí sorgeix la primera reivindicació d'aquest post dirigida a les administracions i departaments responsables de crear i posar en marxa mitjans i programes d’autocura per a professionals que tinguin contacte directa amb la violència sigui del tipus que sigui, si volem un servei de qualitat i millor atenció cal tenir cura dels i les professionals, cal tenir cura dels equips de professionals...ara també hi ha una part de responsabilitat individual que mentre això no arribi com a professionals també hem de tenir la responsabilitat de l’autocura personal, i buscar l’ajuda i els mitjans necessaris davant els indicadors i avisos q el nostre organisme ens va donant i no fem cap cas...un molt bon indicador de burn-out en equips de professionals és l’absència de comunicació entre els membres de l’equip, l’aïllament de cada professional a l'hora de treballar, també la queixa instal·lada per sistema dins l'equip, o queixar-se absolutament de tot i per tot, i vull destacar un de perillós que té un greu efecte en les persones que atenem: el domini dels prejudicis de tot tipus (masclistes, xenòfobs, classistes...) i que lamentablement contaminen les intervencions, actuacions i percepcions...amb greus conseqüències per a les persones que s'atèn, especialment les persones que han patit un delicte...cal una revisió urgent dels equips, professionals i actuacions.(ho faig extensible a tots els àmbits: policial,ensenyament, salut, serveis socials, serveis especialitzats...) que estiguin implicats en els circuits i la xarxa contra la violència masclista.

Quan es denuncien aspectes relacionats amb la pràctica professional automàticament "salten les alarmes" i els mecanismes de defensa es disparen a gran velocitat: el negacionisme ("això no és així", "això no passa") i el corporativisme ("tot ho fem superbé", "som els millors","qualsevol error és una debilitat, per tant ens defensarem a nosaltres mateixos fins a l'absurd..."). Jo considero el corporativisme una font de violència institucional, però això serà el nucli d'un altre post.



No es tracta de parlar de males intencions que motivin aquests tipus de maneres de "fer malament", tampoc buscar caps de turc, es tracta de ser estrictament crítics i denunciar les males pràctiques dels serveis públics, i en moltes ocasions no és només per manca de mitjans (principal argument quan hi ha un lleu reconeixement), sinó per tots els motius exposats abans i podem afegir-ne més: per manca de voluntat, motivació personal, falta de formació específica, comoditat, passivitat,por a la reacció d'exclussió o rebuig de l'equip...i això sí que ho defensaré avui i demà on faci falta, no tinc cap problema en fer-ho.



Algunes de les principals males pràctiques detectades (en la part 2 d'aquest mateix post tractaré sobre més pràctiques detectades i algunes conseqüències de les mateixes):

-En moltes ocasions dones que tenen intenció de denunciar situacions de violència de gènere són animades a NO fer-ho, per diferents tècniques: principalment informant-li que NO li donaran cap ordre de protecció al respecte..., preguntant més de 5 vegades si està segura..., afirmant amb contundència que la situació pot anar a pitjor si denuncia... que el marit maltractador s’emprenyarà més i/o es posarà més violent..., o simplement dient que No hi ha proves suficients i que el més probable és que li arxivaran el procediment, en definitiva transmetre el missatge “que no val la pena” iniciar un procés judicial...això recorda massa a l’anecdòta que explicava quan vaig començar a treballar i lluitar contra la violència masclista (2002) aquell policia nacional que li deia a la víctima: “¿denunciar a su marido?, no, mire usted, vuelva a su casa y le prepara una tortilla de patatas a su marido y verá como todo se arregla”...i és preocupant, les formes són diferents, més cuidades, però el sentit és el mateix: la violència com a tema privat. Recordo que denunciar és un dret, i es pot presentar denúncia a qualsevol comissaria, al jutjat de guàrdia i davant la fiscalia.

Cal prendre consciència que quan una dona que està patint violència va a un servei especialitzat, quan va a una comissaria de policia, no va a passar l’estona, va perquè té un problema seriós, i un problema greu que per ella mateixa no pot gestionar, va a demanar ajuda, protecció, seguretat, orientació... La violència masclista, la violència sexual, l'assetjament, els abusos sexuals...són delictes molt greus, cal una intervenció molt acurada amb les dones que estan patint aquestes situacions, una intervenció especialitzada i molt efectiva, perquè una mala praxis, un malgest, una mirada, un comentari concret pot tombar tot un treball previ de preparació de mesos...



Els únics que tenen la competència per jutjar que allò que explica la dona és un delicte són jutges i jutgesses. Faig aquest recordatori per resituar en les diferents funcions que cada professional ha de desenvolupar, cal destacar que treballem amb persones danyades, persones traumades, persones i ciutadanes de ple dret i cal defensar la vida,llibertat,seguretat i dignitat de les mateixes fins persones. Cal reflexionar per millorar, cal reconèixer i coratge per canviar el que faci falta, cal voluntat individual i política seriosa, i sobretot tenacitat per avançar.

Escric aquest post des de la profunda preocupació i indignació per la situació i amb ànims de canviar i millorar la intervenció policial que s'està donant a moltes de les comissaries, als domicilis i als carrers davant situacions de violència masclista. No és una qüestió només de règim intern o codis de conducta d'uns agents concrets, vaig molt més enllà, precissament escric aquest post també des del cor i agraïment a tots i totes aquelles agents del cos policial que volen treballar més i millor, que també pateixen la impotència, la ràbia, la soledat i són testimonis de tot allò que aquí he explicat. Treballo cada dia enxarxat amb professionals de molts sectors, els fets exposats estan fonamentats amb proves concretes, testimonis i registres. Crec que els casos de violència de gènere, la violència sexual, els maltractaments intrafamiliars,...des de l'inici que és vital fins al final del procés, la intervenció professional a tots els nivells (policial, social, psicològica, judicial) ha de ser especialitzada i amb perspectiva de gènere sí o sí.

Continuarà...

Rubèn Sanchez Ruiz
@RobenFawkes


          原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习   




原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
网络

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
算法

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
测试

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
机器学习

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
深度学习



前言
机器学习和深度学习现在很火!突然间每个人都在讨论它们-不管大家明不明白它们的不同!
不管你是否积极紧贴数据分析,你都应该听说过它们。
正好展示给你要关注它们的点,这里是它们关键词的google指数:

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
如果你一直想知道机器学习和深度学习的不同,那么继续读下去,下文会告诉你一个关于两者的通俗的详细对比。
我会详细介绍它们,然后会对它们进行比较并解释它们的用途。

目录表
1 机器学习和深度学习是什么?
1.1 什么是机器学习?
1.2 什么是深度学习?
2 机器学习和深度学习的比较
2.1 数据依赖
2.2 硬件依赖
2.3 问题解决办法
2.4 特征工程
2.5 执行时间
2.6 可解释性
3 机器学习和深度学习目前的应用场景?
4 测试
5 未来发展趋势

1.什么是机器学习和深度学习?
让我们从基础开始——什么是机器学习,什么是深度学习。如果你已经知道答案了,那么你可以直接跳到第二章。

1.1 什么是机器学习?
“机器学习”最受广泛引用的定义是来自于Tom Mitchell对它的解释概括:
“如果一个计算机程序在任务T中,利用评估方法P并通过相应的经验E而使性能得到提高,则说这个程序从经验E中得到了学习”
这句话是不是听起来特别难以理解?让我们用一些简单的例子来说明它。

例子1-机器学习-基于身高预测体重

假如你现在需要创建一个系统,它能够基于身高来告诉人们预期的体重。有几个原因可能可以解释为什么这样的事会引起人们兴趣的原因。你可以使用这个系统来过滤任何可能的欺诈数据或捕获误差。而你需要做的第一件事情是收集数据,假如你的数据像这个样子:


原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
图中的每个点都代表一个数据点。首先,我们可以画一条简单的直线来根据身高预测体重。例如是这么一条直线:
Weight (in kg) = Height (in cm) - 100
它可以帮助我们做出预测。如果这条直线看起来画得不错,我们就需要理解它的表现。在这个例子中,我们需要减少预测值与真实值之间的差距,这是我们评估性能的办法。

进一步说,如果我们收集到更多的数据(经验上是这样),我们的模型表现将会变得更好。我们也可以通过添加更多的变量来提高模型(例如`性别`),那样也会有一条不一样的预测线。


例子2-风暴预测系统
让我们举个复杂一点点的例子。假设你在开发一个风暴预测系统,你手里有过往所有发生过的风暴数据,以及这些风暴发生前三个月的天气状况数据。
想一下,如果我们要去做一个风暴预测系统,该怎么做呢?

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
首先,我们需要探索所有数据并找到数据的模式(规则)。我们的任务是寻找什么情况下会引起风暴发生。
我们可以模拟一些条件,例如温度大于40摄氏度,温度介于80到100之间等等,然后把这些“特征”手动输入到我们的系统里。
或者,我们也可以让系统从数据中理解这些特征的合适值。
现在,找到了这些值,你就可以从之前的所有数据中预测一个风暴是否会生成。基于这些由我们的系统设定的特征值,我们可以评估一下系统的性能表现,也就是系统预测风暴发生的正确次数。我们可以迭代上面的步骤多次,给系统提供反馈信息。
让我们用正式的语言来定义我们的风暴系统:我们的任务`T`是寻找什么样的大气条件会引起一个风暴。性能`P`描述的是系统所提供的全部情况中,正确预测到风暴发生的次数。而经验`E`就是我们系统的不断重复运行所产生的。

1.2 什么是深度学习?
深度学习并不是新的概念,它已经出现好一些年了。但在今时今日的大肆宣传下,深度学习变得越来越受关注。正如在机器学习所做的事情一样,我们也将正式的定义“深度学习”并用简单的例子来说明它。
“深度学习是一种特别的机器学习,它把世界当做嵌套的层次概念来学习从而获得强大的能力和灵活性,每一个概念都由相关更简单的概念来定义,而更抽象的表征则通过较形象的表征计算得到。”
现在-这看起来很令人困惑,让我们用简单的例子来说明。

例子1-形状检测
让我们从一个简单的例子开始,这个例子解释了概念层次上发生了什么。我们来尝试理解怎样从其他形状中识别出正方形。

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
我们的眼睛首先会做的是检查这个图形是否由4条边组成(简单的概念)。如果我们找到4条边,我们接着会检查这4条边是否相连、闭合、垂直并且它们是否等长的(嵌套层次的概念)
如此,我们接受一个复杂的任务(识别一个正方形)并把它转化为简单的较抽象任务。深度学习本质上就是大规模的执行这种任务。

例子2-猫狗大战
让我们举一个动物识别的例子,这个例子中我们的系统需要识别给定的图片是一只猫还是一只狗。

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
如果我们把这个当做典型的机器学习问题来解决,我们会定义一些特征,例如:这个动物有没有胡须,是否有耳朵,如果有,那是不是尖耳朵。简单来说,我们会定义面部特征并让系统识别哪些特征对于识别一个具体的动物来说是重要的。
深度学习走得更深一步。深度学习自动找到对分类重要的特征,而在机器学习,我们必须手工地给出这些特征。深度学习的工作模式:


首先识别一只猫或一只狗相应的边缘


然后在这个基础上逐层构建,找到边缘和形状的组合。例如是否有胡须,或者是否有耳朵等


在对复杂的概念持续层级地识别后,最终会决定哪些特征对找到答案是有用的

2.机器学习和深度学习的比较
现在你已经了解机器学习和深度学习的概念了,我们接着将会花点时间来比较这两种技术。

2.1 数据依赖

深度学习和传统机器学习最重要的区别在于数据量增长下的表现差异。当数据量很少的时候,深度学习算法不会有好的表现,这是因为深度学习算法需要大量数据来完美地实现。相反,传统机器学习在这个情况下是占优势的。下图概括了这个事实。



原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习

2.2 硬件依赖
深度学习算法高度依赖高端机器,相较之下传统的机器学习算法可以在低端机器中运行。这是因为深度学习算法对GPU的依赖是它在工作中的重要部分。深度学习算法内在需要做大量的矩阵乘法运算,这些运算可以通过GPU实现高效优化,因为GPU就是因此而生的。

2.3 特征工程
特征工程是将领域知识引入到创建特征提取器的过程,这样做的目的在于减少数据的复杂性并且使模式更清晰,更容易被学习算法所使用。无论从对时间还是对专业知识的要求,这个过程都是艰难的而且是高成本的。
在机器学习中,绝大多数应用特征需要专业知识来处理,然后根据领域和数据类型进行硬编码。
举个例子,特征数据可以是像素值、文本数据、位置数据、方位数据。绝大多数的机器学习算法的性能表现依赖于特征识别和抽取的准确度。
深度学习算法尝试从数据中学习高级特征。这是深度学习一个特别的部分,也是传统机器学习主要的步骤。因此,深度学习在所有问题上都免除了特征提取器的开发步骤。就像卷积神经网络会尝试学习低级特征,例如在低层中学习边缘和线条,然后是部分的人脸,再接着是人脸的高层表征。

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习

2.4 问题解决办法
当使用传统机器学习算法求解一个问题时,它通常会建议把问题细分成不同的部分,然后独立地解决他们然后合并到一起从而获得最终结果。然而深度学习却主张端对端地解决问题。
让我们用一个例子来理解。
假设你现在有一个多目标检测任务。这个任务要求识别目标是什么和它出现在图像中的位置。

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
在一个传统机器学习方法中,你会把问题分成两个步骤:目标检测和目标识别。首先你会用一个像grabcut一样的边框检测算法来扫描图像并找到所有可能的目标。然后,对所有被识别的对象,你会使用对象识别算法,如带HOG特征的SVM,来识别相关对象。
相反地,在深度学习方法中,你会端对端地执行这个过程。例如,在一个YOLO网络中(一款深度学习算法),你传入一个图像,接着它会给出对象的位置和名称。

2.5 执行时间
通常神经网络算法都会训练很久,因为神经网络算法中有很多参数,所以训练它们通常比其他算法要耗时。目前最好的深度学习算法ResNet需要两周时间才能完成从随机参数开始的训练。而机器学习相对而言则只需要很短的时间来训练,大概在几秒到几小时不等。
但在测试的时候就完全相反了。在测试的时候,深度学习算法只需要运行很短的时间。然而,如果你把它拿来与K-近邻(一种机器学习算法)来比较,测试时间会随着数据量的增长而增加。但是这也不意味着所有机器学习算法都如此,其中有一些算法测试时间也是很短的。

2.6 可解释性
最后,我们也把可解释性作为一个因素来对比一下机器学习和深度学习。这也是深度学习在它被应用于工业之前被研究了很久的主要因素。
举个例子,假设我们使用深度学习来给文章自动打分。它打分的表现十分的好并且非常接近人类水平,但是有个问题,它不能告诉我们为什么它要给出这样的分数。实际在数学上,你可以找到一个深度神经网络哪些结点被激活了,但我们不知道这些神经元被模型怎么利用,而且也不知道这些层在一起做了点什么事情。所以我们不能结果进行合理的解释。
在另一方面,机器学习算法例如决策树,通过清晰的规则告诉我们为什么它要选择了什么,所以它是特别容易解释结果背后的原因。因此,像决策树和线性/逻辑回归一样的算法由于可解释性而广泛应用于工业界。

3.机器学习和深度学习目前的应用场景?
维基百科文章给出了机器学习所有应用场景的概述,它们包括:


计算机视觉:例如车牌号码识别和人脸识别


信息检索:例如文字和图像的搜索引擎


市场营销:自动邮件营销,目标监察


医疗诊断:癌症识别,异常检测


自然语言处理:情感分析,图片标注


在线广告等。


原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
上图简要总结了机器学习的应用领域,尽管它描述的还包括了整个机器智能领域。
一个应用机器学习和深度学习最好的例子就是谷歌了。

原创翻译 | 深度学习与机器学习 - 您需要知道的基本差异!深度学习
上图中,你可以看到谷歌把机器学习应用在它各种各样的产品中。机器学习和深度学习的应用是没有边际的,你需要的是寻找对的时机!

4.测试
为了评估你是否真正了解这些差异,我们接着会来做一个测试。你可以在这儿发布你的答案。
请注意回答问题的步骤。


你会怎样用机器学习解决下面的问题?


你会怎样用深度学习解决下面的问题?


结论:哪个是更好的方法?


情节1:
你要开发一个汽车自动驾驶的软件系统,这个系统会从摄像机获取原始像素数据并预测车轮需要调整的角度。

情节2:
给定一个人的认证信息和背景信息,你的系统需要评估这个人是否能够通过一笔贷款申请。

情节3:
为了一个俄罗斯代表能解决当地群众的问题,你需要建立一个能把俄文翻译成印地语的系统。

5.未来发展趋势
上述文章可以给了你关于机器学习和深度学习以及它们之间差异的概述。本章中,我想要分享一下我对机器学习和深度学习未来发展趋势的看法。


首先,由于工业界对数据科学和机器学习使用需求量的增长,在业务上应用机器学习对公司运营会变得更加重要。而且,每个人都会想要知道基础术语。


深度学习每天都给我们每个人制造惊喜,并且在不久的将来也会持续着这个趋势。这是因为深度学习已经被证明是能实现最先进表现的最佳技术之一。


机器学习和深度学习的研究会持续进行。但与前些年局限于学术上的研究有所区别,深度学习和机器学习领域上的研究会在工业界和学术界同时爆发。而且随着可用资金的增加,它会更可能成为整个人类发展的主题。

我个人紧随着这些趋势。我通常在关于机器学习和深度学习的新闻中获得重要信息,那些信息会使我在最近发生事情中不断进步。而且,我也一直关注着arxiv上每天更新的论文以及相应的代码。

结束语
在这篇文章中,我们从一个相对高的角度进行了总结,并且比较了深度学习跟机器学习的算法之间的异同点。我希望这能让您未来在这两个领域中的学习中变得更有自信。这是关于机器学习以及深度学习的一个学习路线。
如果您有任何的疑问,完全可以放心大胆地在评论区提问。

英文原文链接:https://www.analyticsvidhya.com/blog/2017/04/comparison-between-deep-learning-machine-learning/


          Paid To Prey (PTP) journals    
In the bad old days if you as a scientist had something worth saying, a journal would (after vetting through a mainly fair confidential review system) publish it.  If you had good things to say, whether or not you had grants, your ideas were heard, and you could make a career on the basis of the depth of your thought, your careful results, and so on.

If you needed funds to do your research, such as to travel or run a laboratory, well, you needed a grant to do your work.  This was the system we all knew.  You had to have funding, but you couldn't just pay your way through to publishing.  Also, if you were junior, start-up funds were typically made available if you needed them, to give you a leg up and a chance to get your career going.

Publishing has always had costs, of course, but the journals survived by library and personal subscriptions, often based on professional society memberships, where the fees were modest, especially for the most junior members.

Now what we have is a large pay-to-play (PTP) industry.  Pay-to-play journals are almost synonymous with corruption.  The mass of nearly-criminal ones prey on the career fears of desperate students, post-docs, and faculty (especially junior faculty, perhaps).  Even the honest PTP journals, of which there are many, essentially prey on investigators, and taxpayers, but the horde of dishonorable ones are no better than highwaymen, robbing the most vulnerable.  A story in the NY Times exposes some of the schemes and scams of the dishonorable PTPers.  But it doesn't go nearly far enough.

How cruel is this rat race?  Where does the PTP money come from?
We have every moral as well as fiscal right to ask where the PTP subscriptions are coming from.  Are low-paid, struggling post-docs, students, junior or even more senior faculty members using their own personal funds to keep in the publication score-counting game?  How much taxpayer money goes, even via legitimate grants, to these open-source publishers rather than to the research costs for which these grants were intended.  In the past, you might have had to pay for color figures, or for reprints, and these costs did come generally from grant funds, but they were not very expensive.  And of course grants often pay for faculty salaries (a major corruption of the system that nobody seems able to fix and on which too many depend to criticize).

The idea of open-source journals sounded good, and not like a private-profiteering scam.  But too many have turned out to be the latter, chickens laying golden eggs even for the better journals, when there is profit to be made. The original, or at least more publicly proclaimed open-source idea was that even if you couldn't afford a subscription or didn't have access to a university library--especially, for example, if you were in a country with a paucity of science resources--you would have access to the world's top science anyway.  But even if the best of the open-source organizations are non-profit, non-predatory PTP operations, and how would we know?, we are clearly preying on the fears of those desperate for careers in heavily oversubscribed, heavily Malthusian overpopulated science industries.

There is no secret about that, but too many depend on the growth model for there to be an easy fix, except the painful one of budget cuts.  The system is overloaded and overworked and that suggests that even if everyone were doing his/her best, sloppy or even corrupt work would make it through the minimal PTP quality control sieve.  And that makes it easy to see why many may be paying with personal funds or submitting sloppy (or worse) work--and too much of it, too fast.

There isn't any obvious solution in an overheated hyper-competitive system.  We do have the web, however, and one might suggest shutting down the PTP industry, or at least somehow closing its predatory members, and using the web to publicize new findings.  Perhaps some of the open review sources, like ArXiv, can deal with some of the peer reviewing issues to maintain a quality standard.

Of course, Deans and Chairs would have to actually do the work of evaluating the quality of their faculty members' works (beyond 'impact factors', grant totals, paper counts, and so on) to reward quality of thought rather than any quantity-based measures.  That would require the administrators to actually think, know their fields, and take the time to do their jobs.  Perhaps that's too much to ask of a system now sometimes proudly proclaiming it's on the 'business model'.

But what we're seeing is what we deserve because we've let it happen.
          Selfadjoint extensions of the multiplication operator in de Branges spaces as singular rank-one perturbations. (arXiv:1706.09400v1 [math.FA])   

Authors: Luis O. Silva, Julio H. Toloza

We derive a description of the family of canonical selfadjoint extensions of the operator of multiplication in a de Branges space in terms of singular rank-one perturbations using distinguished elements from the set of functions associated with a de Branges space. The scale of rigged Hilbert spaces associated with this construction is also studied from the viewpoint of de Branges spaces.


          Generalized notions of sparsity and restricted isometry property. Part I: A unified framework. (arXiv:1706.09410v1 [stat.ML])   

Authors: Marius Junge, Kiryung Lee

The restricted isometry property (RIP) is an integral tool in the analysis of various inverse problems with sparsity models. Motivated by the applications of compressed sensing and dimensionality reduction of low-rank tensors, we propose generalized notions of sparsity and provide a unified framework for the corresponding RIP, in particular when combined with isotropic group actions. Our results extend an approach by Rudelson and Vershynin to a much broader context including commutative and noncommutative function spaces. Moreover, our Banach space notion of sparsity applies to affine group actions. The generalized approach in particular applies to high order tensor products.


          Entanglement, Replicas, and Thetas. (arXiv:1706.09426v1 [hep-th])   

Authors: Sunil Mukhi, Sameer Murthy, Jie-Qiang Wu

We compute the single-interval Renyi entropy (replica partition function) for free fermions in 1+1d at finite temperature and finite spatial size by two methods: (i) using the higher-genus partition function on the replica Riemann surface, and (ii) using twist operators on the torus. We compare the two answers for a restricted set of spin structures, leading to a non-trivial proposed equivalence between higher-genus Siegel $\Theta$-functions and Jacobi $\theta$-functions. We exhibit this proposal and provide substantial evidence for it. The resulting expressions can be elegantly written in terms of Jacobi forms. Thereafter we argue that the correct Renyi entropy for modular-invariant free-fermion theories, such as the Ising model and the Dirac CFT, is given by the higher-genus computation summed over all spin structures. The result satisfies the physical checks of modular covariance, the thermal entropy relation, and Bose-Fermi equivalence.


          Approximate Quantum Error Correction Revisited: Introducing the Alphabit. (arXiv:1706.09434v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Patrick Hayden, Geoffrey Penington

We establish that, in an appropriate limit, qubits of communication should be regarded as composite resources, decomposing cleanly into independent correlation and transmission components. Because qubits of communication can establish ebits of entanglement, qubits are more powerful resources than ebits. We identify a new communications resource, the zero-bit, which is precisely half the gap between them; replacing classical bits by zero-bits makes teleportation asymptotically reversible. The decomposition of a qubit into an ebit and two zero-bits has wide-ranging consequences including applications to state merging, the quantum channel capacity, entanglement distillation, quantum identification and remote state preparation. The source of these results is the theory of approximate quantum error correction. The action of a quantum channel is reversible if and only if no information is leaked to the environment, a characterization that is useful even in approximate form. However, different notions of approximation lead to qualitatively different forms of quantum error correction in the limit of large dimension. We study the effect of a constraint on the dimension of the reference system when considering information leakage. While the resulting condition fails to ensure that the entire input can be corrected, it does ensure that all subspaces of dimension matching that of the reference are correctable. The size of the reference can be characterized by a parameter $\alpha$; we call the associated resource an $\alpha$-bit. Changing $\alpha$ interpolates between standard quantum error correction and quantum identification, a form of equality testing for quantum states. We develop the theory of $\alpha$-bits, including the applications above, and determine the $\alpha$-bit capacity of general quantum channels, finding single-letter formulas for the entanglement-assisted and amortised variants.


          Asymptotic dimensioning of stochastic service systems. (arXiv:1706.09440v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Britt W.J. Mathijsen

Stochastic service systems describe situations in which customers compete for service from scarce resources. Think of check-in lines at airports, waiting rooms in hospitals or queues in supermarkets, where the scarce resource is human manpower. Next to these traditional settings, resource sharing is also important in large-scale service systems such as the internet, wireless networks and cloud computing facilities. In these virtual environments, geographical conditions do not restrict the system size, paving the way for the emergence of large-scale resource sharing networks. This thesis investigates how to design large-scale systems in order to achieve the dual goal of operational efficiency and quality-of-service, by which we mean that the system is highly occupied and hence efficiently utilizes the expensive resources, while at the same time, the level of service, experienced by customers, remains high.


          Unconstrained and Curvature-Constrained Shortest-Path Distances and their Approximation. (arXiv:1706.09441v1 [cs.CG])   

Authors: Ery Arias-Castro, Thibaut Le Gouic

We study shortest paths and their distances on a subset of a Euclidean space, and their approximation by their equivalents in a neighborhood graph defined on a sample from that subset. In particular, we recover and extend the results that Bernstein et al. (2000), developed in the context of manifold learning, and those of Karaman and Frazzoli (2011), developed in the context of robotics. We do the same with curvature-constrained shortest paths and their distances, establishing what we believe are the first approximation bounds for them.


          On compatibility of the $\ell$-adic realisations of an abelian motive. (arXiv:1706.09444v1 [math.AG])   

Authors: Johan Commelin

In this article we introduce the notion of a quasi-compatible system of Galois representations. The quasi-compatibility condition is a slight relaxation of the classical compatibility condition in the sense of Serre. The main theorem that we prove is the following: Let $M$ be an abelian motive, in the sense of Yves Andr\'e. Then the $\ell$-adic realisations of $M$ form a quasi-compatible system of Galois representations. (In fact, we actually prove something stronger. See theorem 5.1.) As an application, we deduce that the absolute rank of the $\ell$-adic monodromy groups of $M$ does not depend on $\ell$. In particular, the Mumford-Tate conjecture for $M$ does not depend on $\ell$.


          Robust Regulation of Infinite-Dimensional Port-Hamiltonian Systems. (arXiv:1706.09445v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Jukka-Pekka Humaloja, Lassi Paunonen

We will give general sufficient conditions under which a controller achieves robust regulation for a boundary control and observation system. Utilizing these conditions we construct a minimal order robust controller for an arbitrary order impedance passive linear port-Hamiltonian system. The theoretical results are illustrated with a numerical example where we implement a controller for a one-dimensional Euler-Bernoulli beam with boundary controls and boundary observations.


          On the tightness of Gaussian concentration for convex functions. (arXiv:1706.09446v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Petros Valettas

The concentration of measure phenomenon in Gauss' space states that every $L$-Lipschitz map $f$ on $\mathbb R^n$ satisfies \[ \gamma_{n} \left(\{ x : | f(x) - M_{f} | \geqslant t \} \right) \leqslant 2 e^{

- \frac{t^2}{ 2L^2} }, \quad t>0, \] where $\gamma_{n} $ is the standard Gaussian measure on $\mathbb R^{n}$ and $M_{f}$ is a median of $f$. In this work, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for when this inequality can be reversed, up to universal constants, in the case when $f$ is additionally assumed to be convex. In particular, we show that if the variance ${\rm Var}(f)$ (with respect to $\gamma_{n}$) satisfies $ \alpha L \leqslant \sqrt{ {\rm Var}(f) } $ for some $ 0<\alpha \leqslant 1$, then \[ \gamma_{n} \left(\{ x : | f(x) - M_{f} | \geqslant t \}\right) \geqslant c e^{

-C \frac{t^2}{ L^2} } , \quad t>0 ,\] where $c,C>0$ are constants depending only on $\alpha$.


          Cooperative Vehicle Speed Fault Diagnostics and Correction. (arXiv:1706.09447v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Mohammad Pirani, Ehsan Hashemi, Amir Khajepour, Baris Fidan, Bakhtiar Litkouhi, Shih-Ken Chen

Reliable estimation (or measurement) of vehicle states has always been an active topic of research in the automotive industry and academia. Among the vehicle states, vehicle speed has a priority due to its critical importance in traction and stability control. Moreover, the emergence of new generation of communication technologies has brought a new avenue to traditional studies on vehicle estimation and control. To this end, this paper introduces a set of distributed function calculation algorithms for vehicle networks, robust to communication failures. The introduced algorithms enable each vehicle to gather information from other vehicles in the network in a distributed manner. A procedure to use such a bank of information for a single vehicle to diagnose and correct a possible fault in its own speed estimation/measurement is discussed. The functionality and performance of the proposed algorithms are verified via illustrative examples and simulation results.


          Drowning by numbers: topology and physics in fluid dynamics. (arXiv:1706.09454v1 [physics.hist-ph])   

Authors: Amaury Mouchet (LMPT)

Since its very beginnings, topology has forged strong links with physics and the last Nobel prize in physics, awarded in 2016 to Thouless, Haldane and Kosterlitz " for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter", confirmed that these connections have been maintained up to contemporary physics. To give some (very) selected illustrations of what is, and still will be, a cross fertilization between topology and physics, hydrodynamics provides a natural domain through the common theme offered by the notion of vortex, relevant both in classical (\S 2) and in quantum fluids (\S 3). Before getting into the details, I will sketch in \S 1 a general perspective from which this intertwining between topology and physics can be appreciated: the old dichotomy between discreteness and continuity, first dealing with antithetic thesis, eventually appears to be made of two complementary sides of a single coin.


          A Note on Some Approximation Kernels on the Sphere. (arXiv:1706.09456v1 [math.CA])   

Authors: Peter J. Grabner

We produce precise estimates for the Kogbetliantz kernel for the approximation of functions on the sphere. Furthermore, we propose and study a new approximation kernel, which has slightly better properties.


          Asymptotics with respect to the spectral parameter and Neumann series of Bessel functions for solutions of the one-dimensional Schr\"odinger equation. (arXiv:1706.09457v1 [math.CA])   

Authors: Vladislav V. Kravchenko, Sergii M. Torba

A representation for a solution $u(\omega,x)$ of the equation $-u"+q(x)u=\omega^2 u$, satisfying the initial conditions $u(\omega,0)=1$, $u'(\omega,0)=i\omega$ is derived in the form \[ u(\omega,x)=e^{i\omega x}\left( 1+\frac{u_1(x)}{\omega}+ \frac{u_2(x)}{\omega^2}\right) +\frac{e^{-i\omega x}u_3(x)}{\omega^2}-\frac{1}{\omega^2}\sum_{n=0}^{\infty} i^{n}\alpha_n(x)j_n(\omega x), \] where $u_m(x)$, $m=1,2,3$ are given in a closed form, $j_n$ stands for a spherical Bessel function of order $n$ and the coefficients $\alpha_n$ are calculated by a recurrent integration procedure. The following estimate is proved $\vert u(\omega,x) -u_N(\omega,x)\vert \leq \frac{1}{\vert \omega \vert^2}\varepsilon_N(x)\sqrt{\frac{\sinh(2\mathop{\rm Im}\omega\,x)}{\mathop{\rm Im}\omega}}$ for any $\omega\in\mathbb{C}\backslash \{0\}$, where $u_N(\omega,x)$ is an approximate solution given by truncating the series in the representation for $u(\omega,x)$ and $\varepsilon_N(x)$ is a nonnegative function tending to zero for all $x$ belonging to a finite interval of interest. In particular, for $\omega\in\mathbb{R}\backslash \{0\}$ the estimate has the form $\vert u(\omega,x)-u_N(\omega,x)\vert \leq \frac{1}{\vert\omega\vert^2}\varepsilon_N(x)$. A numerical illustration of application of the new representation for computing the solution $u(\omega,x)$ on large sets of values of the spectral parameter $\omega$ with an accuracy nondeteriorating (and even improving) when $\omega \rightarrow \pm \infty$ is given.


          On the thermodynamic limit of form factor expansions of dynamical correlation functions in the massless regime of the XXZ spin $1/2$ chain. (arXiv:1706.09459v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: K. K. Kozlowski

This work constructs a well-defined and operational form factor expansion in a model having a massless spectrum of excitations. More precisely, the dynamic two-point functions in the massless regime of the XXZ spin-1/2 chain are expressed in terms of properly regularised series of multiple integrals. These series are obtained by taking, in an appropriate way, the thermodynamic limit of the finite volume form factor expansions. The series are structured in way allowing one to identify directly the contributions to the correlator stemming from the conformal-type excitations on the Fermi surface and those issuing from the massive excitations (deep holes, particles and bound states). The obtained form factor series opens up the possibility of a systematic and exact study of asymptotic regimes of dynamical correlation functions in the massless regime of the XXZ spin $1/2$ chain. Furthermore, the assumptions on the microscopic structure of the model's Hilbert space that are necessary so as to write down the series appear to be compatible with any model -not necessarily integrable- belonging to the Luttinger liquid universality class. Thus, the present analysis provides also the phenomenological structure of form factor expansions in massless models belonging to this universality class.


          Fixed Point Theorem For F-Contraction Of Generalized Multivalued Integral Type Mappings. (arXiv:1706.09460v1 [math.GM])   

Authors: Derya Sekman, Vatan Karakaya, Nour El Houda Bouzara-Sahraoui

In this work, our main problem is to introduce a new concept of the generalized multivalued integral type mappings under F-contraction and also to investigate important properties of this notion. Moreover, we give some interesting examples of this problem.


          New analytic properties of nonstandard Sobolev-type Charlier orthogonal polynomials. (arXiv:1706.09474v1 [math.CA])   

Authors: Edmundo J. Huertas, Anier Soria-Lorente

In this contribution we consider the sequence $\{Q_{n}^{\lambda }\}_{n\geq 0} $ of monic polynomials orthogonal with respect to the following inner product involving differences \begin{equation*} \langle p,q\rangle _{\lambda }=\int_{0}^{\infty }p\left( x\right) q\left(x\right) d\psi ^{(a)}(x)+\lambda \,\Delta p(c)\Delta q(c), \end{equation*} where $\lambda \in \mathbb{R}_{+}$, $\Delta $ denotes the forward difference operator defined by $\Delta f\left( x\right) =f\left( x+1\right) -f\left(x\right) $, $\psi ^{(a)}$ with $a>0$ is the well known Poisson distribution of probability theory \begin{equation*} d\psi ^{(a)}(x)=\frac{e^{-a}a^{x}}{x!}\quad \text{at }x=0,1,2,\ldots , \end{equation*} and $c\in \mathbb{R}$ is such that the spectrum of $\psi ^{(a)}$ is contained in an interval $I$ and $I\cap (c,c+1)=\varnothing $. We derive its corresponding hypergeometric representation. The ladder operators associated with these polynomials are obtained, and the linear difference equation of second order is also given. Moreover, for real values of $c$ such that $c+1<0 $, we present some results on the distribution of its zeros as decreasing functions of $\lambda $ when this parameter goes from zero to infinity.


          New results on the order of functions at infinity. (arXiv:1706.09475v1 [math.CA])   

Authors: Meitner Cadena, Marie Kratz, Edward Omey

Recently, new classes of positive and measurable functions, $\mathcal{M}(\rho)$ and $\mathcal{M}(\pm \infty)$, have been defined in terms of their asymptotic behaviour at infinity, when normalized by a logarithm (Cadena et al., 2015, 2016, 2017). Looking for other suitable normalizing functions than logarithm seems quite natural. It is what is developed in this paper, studying new classes of functions of the type $\displaystyle \lim_{x\rightarrow \infty}\log U(x)/H(x)=\rho <\infty$ for a large class of normalizing functions $H$. It provides subclasses of $\mathcal{M}(0)$ and $\mathcal{M}(\pm\infty)$.


          On the heat content for the poisson kernels over sets of finite perimeter. (arXiv:1706.09477v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Luis Acuna Valverde

This paper studies the small time behavior of the heat content for the Poisson kernel over a bounded open set $\dom\subset \Rd$, $d\geq 2$, of finite perimeter by working with the set covariance function. As a result, we obtain a third order expansion involving geometric features related to the underlying set $\dom$. We provide the explicit form of the third term for the unit ball when $d=2$ and $d=3$ and supply some results concerning the square $[-1,1]\times [-1,1]$.


          A Markov decision process approach to optimizing cancer therapy using multiple modalities. (arXiv:1706.09481v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Kelsey Maass, Minsun Kim

There are several different modalities, e.g., surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, that are currently used to treat cancer. It is common practice to use a combination of these modalities to maximize clinical outcomes, which are often measured by a balance between maximizing tumor damage and minimizing normal tissue side effects due to treatment. However, multi-modality treatment policies are mostly empirical in current practice, and are therefore subject to individual clinicians' experiences and intuition. We present a novel formulation of optimal multi-modality cancer management using a finite-horizon Markov decision process approach. Specifically, at each decision epoch, the clinician chooses an optimal treatment modality based on the patient's observed state, which we define as a combination of tumor progression and normal tissue side effect. Treatment modalities are categorized as (1) Type 1, which has a high risk and high reward, but is restricted in the frequency of administration during a treatment course, (2) Type 2, which has a lower risk and lower reward than Type 1, but may be repeated without restriction, and (3) Type 3, no treatment (surveillance), which has the possibility of reducing normal tissue side effect at the risk of worsening tumor progression. Numerical simulations using various intuitive, concave reward functions show the structural insights of optimal policies and demonstrate the potential applications of using a rigorous approach to optimizing multi-modality cancer management.


          User Clustering for Multicast Precoding in Multi-Beam Satellite Systems. (arXiv:1706.09482v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Alessandro Guidotti, Alessandro Vanelli-Coralli, Giorgio Taricco, Guido Montorsi

Current State-of-the-Art High Throughput Satellite systems provide wide-area connectivity through multi-beam architectures. However, due to the tremendous system throughput requirements that next generation Satellite Communications expect to achieve, traditional 4-colour frequency reuse schemes, i.e., two frequency bands with two orthogonal polarisations, are not sufficient anymore and more aggressive solutions as full frequency reuse are gaining momentum. These approaches require advanced interference management techniques to cope with the significantly increased inter-beam interference, like multicast precoding and Multi User Detection. With respect to the former, several peculiar challenges arise when designed for SatCom systems. In particular, to maximise resource usage while minimising delay and latency, multiple users are multiplexed in the same frame, thus imposing to consider multiple channel matrices when computing the precoding weights. In this paper, we focus on this aspect by re-formulating it as a clustering problem. After introducing a novel mathematical framework, we design a k-means-based clustering algorithm to group users into simultaneously precoded and served clusters. Two similarity metrics are used to this aim: the users' Euclidean distance and their channel distance, i.e., distance in the multidimensional channel vector space. Through extensive numerical simulations, we substantiate the proposed algorithms and identify the parameters driving the system performance.


          All properly ergodic Markov chains over a free group are orbit equivalent. (arXiv:1706.09483v1 [math.DS])   

Authors: Lewis Bowen

Previous work showed that all Bernoulli shifts over a free group are orbit-equivalent. This result is strengthened here by replacing Bernoulli shifts with the wider class of properly ergodic countable state Markov chains over a free group. A list of related open problems is provided.


          Local mollification of Riemannian metrics using Ricci flow, and Ricci limit spaces. (arXiv:1706.09490v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Miles Simon, Peter M. Topping

We use Ricci flow to obtain a local bi-Holder correspondence between Ricci limit spaces in three dimensions and smooth manifolds. This is more than a complete resolution of the three-dimensional case of the conjecture of Anderson-Cheeger-Colding-Tian, describing how Ricci limit spaces in three dimensions must be homeomorphic to manifolds, and we obtain this in the most general, locally non-collapsed case. The proofs build on results and ideas from recent papers of Hochard and the current authors.


          Berry-Esseen Theorem and Quantitative homogenization for the Random Conductance Model with degenerate Conductances. (arXiv:1706.09493v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Sebastian Andres, Stefan Neukamm

We study the random conductance model on the lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$, i.e.\ we consider a linear, finite-difference, divergence-form operator with random coefficients and the associated random walk under random conductances. We allow the conductances to be unbounded and degenerate elliptic, but they need to satisfy a strong moment condition and a quantified ergodicity assumption in form of a spectral gap estimate. As a main result we obtain in dimension $d\geq 3$ quantitative central limit theorems for the random walk in form of a Berry-Esseen estimate with speed $t^{-\frac 1 5+\varepsilon}$ for $d\geq 4$ and $t^{-\frac{1}{10}+\varepsilon}$ for $d=3$. In addition, for $d\geq 3$ we show near-optimal decay estimates on the semigroup associated with the environment process, which plays a central role in quantitative stochastic homogenization. This extends some recent results by Gloria, Otto and the second author to the degenerate elliptic case.


          Grid-forming Control for Power Converters based on Matching of Synchronous Machines. (arXiv:1706.09495v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Taouba Jouini, Catalin Arghir, Florian Dorfler

We consider the problem of grid-forming control of power converters in low-inertia power systems. Starting from an average-switch three-phase inverter model, we draw parallels to a synchronous machine (SM) model and propose a novel grid-forming converter control strategy which dwells upon the main characteristic of a SM: the presence of an internal rotating magnetic field. In particular, we augment the converter system with a virtual oscillator whose frequency is driven by the DC-side voltage measurement and which sets the converter pulse-width-modulation signal, thereby achieving exact matching between the converter in closed-loop and the SM dynamics. We then provide a sufficient condition assuring existence, uniqueness, and global asymptotic stability of equilibria in a coordinate frame attached to the virtual oscillator angle. By actuating the DC-side input of the converter we are able to enforce this sufficient condition. In the same setting, we highlight strict incremental passivity, droop, and power-sharing properties of the proposed framework, which are compatible with conventional requirements of power system operation. We subsequently adopt disturbance decoupling techniques to design additional control loops that regulate the DC-side voltage, as well as AC-side frequency and amplitude, while in the end validating them with numerical experiments.


          Einstein equations under polarized $\mathbb U(1)$ symmetry in an elliptic gauge. (arXiv:1706.09499v1 [gr-qc])   

Authors: Cécile Huneau, Jonathan Luk

We prove local existence of solutions to the Einstein--null dust system under polarized $\mathbb U(1)$ symmetry in an elliptic gauge. Using in particular the previous work of the first author on the constraint equations, we show that one can identify freely prescribable data, solve the constraints equations, and construct a unique local in time solution in an elliptic gauge. Our main motivation for this work, in addition to merely constructing solutions in an elliptic gauge, is to provide a setup for our companion paper in which we study high frequency backreaction for the Einstein equations. In that work, the elliptic gauge we consider here plays a crucial role to handle high frequency terms in the equations. The main technical difficulty in the present paper, in view of the application in our companion paper, is that we need to build a framework consistent with the solution being high frequency, and therefore having large higher order norms. This difficulty is handled by exploiting a reductive structure in the system of equations.


          High-frequency backreaction for the Einstein equations under polarized $\mathbb U(1)$ symmetry. (arXiv:1706.09501v1 [gr-qc])   

Authors: Cécile Huneau, Jonathan Luk

Known examples in plane symmetry or Gowdy symmetry show that given a $1$-parameter family of solutions to the vacuum Einstein equations, it may have a weak limit which does not satisfy the vacuum equations, but instead has a non-trivial stress-energy-momentum tensor. We consider this phenomenon under polarized $\mathbb U(1)$ symmetry - a much weaker symmetry than most of the known examples - such that the stress-energy-momentum tensor can be identified with that of multiple families of null dust propagating in distinct directions. We prove that any generic local-in-time small-data polarized-$\mathbb U(1)$-symmetric solution to the Einstein-multiple null dust system can be achieved as a weak limit of vacuum solutions. Our construction allows the number of families to be arbitrarily large, and appears to be the first construction of such examples with more than two families.


          Extension and Applications of a Variational Approach with Deformed Derivatives. (arXiv:1706.09504v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: J. Weberszpil, J. A. Helayël-Neto

We have recently presented an extension of the standard variational calculus to include the presence of deformed derivatives in the Lagrangian of a system of particles and in the Lagrangian density of field-theoretic models. Classical Euler-Lagrange equations and the Hamiltonian formalism have been re-assessed in this approach. Whenever applied to a number of physical systems, the resulting dynamical equations come out to be the correct ones found in the literature, specially with mass-dependent and with non-linear equations for classical and quantum-mechanical systems. In the present contribution, we extend the variational approach with the intervalar form of deformed derivatives to study higher-order dissipative systems, with application to concrete situations, such as an accelerated point charge - this is the problem of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac force - to stochastic dynamics like the Langevin, the advection-convection-reaction and Fokker-Planck equations, Korteweg-de Vries equation, Landau-Lifshits-Gilbert equation and the Caldirola-Kanai Hamiltonian. By considering these different applications, we show that the formulation investigated in this paper may be a simple and promising path for dealing with dissipative, non-linear and stochastic systems through the variational approach.


          Asymptotic results in weakly increasing subsequences in random words. (arXiv:1706.09510v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Ümit Işlak, Alperen Y. Özdemir

Let $X=(X_1,\ldots,X_n)$ be a vector of i.i.d. random variables where $X_i$'s take their values over $\mathbb{N}$. The purpose of this paper is to study the number of weakly increasing subsequences of $X$ of a given length $k$, and the number of all weakly increasing subsequences of $X$. For the former of these two, it is shown that a central limit theorem holds. Also, the first two moments of each of these two random variables are analyzed, their asymptotics are investigated, and results are related to the case of similar statistics in uniformly random permutations. We conclude the paper with applications on a similarity measure of Steele, and on increasing subsequences of riffle shuffles.


          Mordell-Weil Groups of Linear Systems and the Hitchin Fibration. (arXiv:1706.09515v1 [math.AG])   

Authors: Matthew Woolf

In this paper, we study rational sections of the relative Picard scheme of a linear system on a smooth projective variety. We prove that if the linear system is basepoint-free and the locus of non-integral divisors has codimension at least two, then all rational sections of the relative Picard scheme come from restrictions of line bundles on the variety. As a consequence, we describe the group of sections of the Hitchin fibration for moduli spaces of Higgs bundles on curves.


          Automorphisms of Partially Commutative Groups III: Inversions and Transvections. (arXiv:1706.09517v1 [math.GR])   

Authors: Andrew J. Duncan, Vladimir N. Remeslennikov

The structure of a certain subgroup $S$ of the automorphism group of a partially commutative group (RAAG) $G$ is described in detail: namely the subgroup generated by inversions and elementary transvections. We define admissible subsets of the generators of $G$, and show that $S$ is the subgroup of automorphisms which fix all subgroups $\langle Y\rangle$ of $G$, for all admissible subsets $Y$. A decomposition of $S$ as an iterated tower of semi-direct products in given and the structure of the factors of this decomposition described. The construction allows a presentation of $S$ to be computed, from the commutation graph of $G$.


          Remarks on a new possible discretization scheme for gauge theories. (arXiv:1706.09518v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: Jean-Pierre Magnot

We propose here a new discretization method for a class continuum gauge theories which action functionnals are polynomials of the curvature. Based on the notion of holonomy, this discretization procedure appears gauge-invariant for discretized analogs of Yang-Mills theories, and hence gauge-fixing is fully rigorous for these discretized action functionnals. Heuristic parts are forwarded to the quantization procedure via Feynman integrals and the meaning of the heuristic infinite dimensional Lebesgue integral is questionned.


          A generalization of the Voiculescu theorem for normal operators in semifinite von Neumann algebras. (arXiv:1706.09522v1 [math.OA])   

Authors: Qihui Li, Junhao Shen, Rui Shi

In this paper, we provide a generalized version of the Voiculescu theorem for normal operators by showing that, in a von Neumann algebra with separable pre-dual and a faithful normal semifinite tracial weight $\tau$, a normal operator is an arbitrarily small $(\max\{\|\cdot\|, \Vert\cdot\Vert_{2}\})$-norm perturbation of a diagonal operator. Furthermore, in a countably decomposable, properly infinite von Neumann algebra with a faithful normal semifinite tracial weight, we prove that each self-adjoint operator can be diagonalized modulo norm ideals satisfying a natural condition.


          Mallows Permutations and Finite Dependence. (arXiv:1706.09526v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Alexander E. Holroyd, Tom Hutchcroft, Avi Levy

We use the Mallows permutation model to construct a new family of stationary finitely dependent proper colorings of the integers. We prove that these colorings can be expressed as finitary factors of i.i.d. processes with finite mean coding radii. They are the first colorings known to have these properties. Moreover, we prove that the coding radii have exponential tails, and that the colorings can also be expressed as functions of countable-state Markov chains. We deduce analogous existence statements concerning shifts of finite type and higher-dimensional colorings.


          Coactions of a finite dimensional $C^*$-Hopf algebra on unital $C^*$-algebras, unital inclusions of unital $C^*$-algebras and the strong Morita equivalence. (arXiv:1706.09530v1 [math.OA])   

Authors: Kazunori Kodaka, Tamotsu Teruya

Let $A$ and $B$ be unital $C^*$-algebras and let $H$ be a finite dimensional $C^*$-Hopf algebra. Let $H^0$ be its dual $C^*$-Hopf algebra. Let $(\rho, u)$ and $(\sigma, v)$ be twisted coactions of $H^0$ on $A$ and $B$, respectively. In this paper, we shall show the following theorem: We suppose that the unital inclusions $A\subset A\rtimes_{\rho, u}H$ and $B\subset B\rtimes_{\sigma, v}H$ are strongly Morita equivalent. If $A'\cap (A\rtimes_{\rho, u}H)=\BC1$, then there is a $C^*$-Hopf algebra automorphism $\lambda^0$ of $H^0$ such that the twisted coaction $(\rho, u)$ is strongly Morita equivalent to the twisted coaction $((\id_B \otimes\lambda^0 )\circ\sigma \, , \, (\id_B \otimes\lambda^0 \otimes\lambda^0 )(v))$ induced by $(\sigma, v)$ and $\lambda^0$.


          Metric duality between positive definite kernels and boundary processes. (arXiv:1706.09532v1 [math.FA])   

Authors: Palle Jorgensen, Feng Tian

We study representations of positive definite kernels $K$ in a general setting, but with view to applications to harmonic analysis, to metric geometry, and to realizations of certain stochastic processes. Our initial results are stated for the most general given positive definite kernel, but are then subsequently specialized to the above mentioned applications. Given a positive definite kernel $K$ on $S\times S$ where $S$ is a fixed set, we first study families of factorizations of $K$. By a factorization (or representation) we mean a probability space $\left(B,\mu\right)$ and an associated stochastic process indexed by $S$ which has $K$ as its covariance kernel. For each realization we identify a co-isometric transform from $L^{2}\left(\mu\right)$ onto $\mathscr{H}\left(K\right)$, where $\mathscr{H}\left(K\right)$ denotes the reproducing kernel Hilbert space of $K$. In some cases, this entails a certain renormalization of $K$. Our emphasis is on such realizations which are minimal in a sense we make precise. By minimal we mean roughly that $B$ may be realized as a certain $K$-boundary of the given set $S$. We prove existence of minimal realizations in a general setting.


          Equivariant control data and neighborhood deformation retractions. (arXiv:1706.09539v1 [math.SG])   

Authors: Markus J. Pflaum, Graeme Wilkin

In this article we study Whitney (B) regular stratified spaces with the action of a compact Lie group $G$ which preserves the strata. We prove an equivariant submersion theorem and use it to show that such a $G$-stratified space carries a system of $G$-equivariant control data. As an application, we show that if $A \subset X$ is a closed $G$-stratified subspace which is a union of strata of $X$, then the inclusion $i : A \hookrightarrow X$ is a $G$-equivariant cofibration. In particular, this theorem applies whenever $X$ is a $G$-invariant analytic subspace of an analytic $G$-manifold $M$ and $A \hookrightarrow X$ is a closed $G$-invariant analytic subspace of $X$.


          Absence of replica symmetry breaking in the transverse and longitudinal random field Ising model. (arXiv:1706.09543v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: C. Itoi

It is proved that replica symmetry is not broken in the transverse and longitudinal random field Ising model. In this model, the variance of spin overlap of any component vanishes in any dimension almost everywhere in the coupling constant space in the infinite volume limit. The weak Fortuin-Kasteleyn-Ginibre property in this model and the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities in artificial equivalent models in a path integral representation based on the Lie-Trotter formula enable us to extend Chatterjee's proof for the random field Ising model to the quantum model.


          Infinitesimal bendings of complete Euclidean hypersurfaces. (arXiv:1706.09545v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Miguel Ibieta Jimenez

A local description of the non-flat infinitesimally bendable Euclidean hypersurfaces was recently given by Dajczer and Vlachos \cite{DaVl}. From their classification, it follows that there is an abundance of infinitesimally bendable hypersurfaces that are not isometrically bendable. In this paper we consider the case of complete hypersurfaces $f\colon M^n\to\mathbb{R}^{n+1}$, $n\geq 4$. If there is no open subset where $f$ is either totally geodesic or a cylinder over an unbounded hypersurface of $\mathbb{R}^4$, we prove that $f$ is infinitesimally bendable only along ruled strips. In particular, if the hypersurface is simply connected, this implies that any infinitesimal bending of $f$ is the variational field of an isometric bending.


          Quantitative estimate of propagation of chaos for stochastic systems with $W^{-1, \infty}$ kernels. (arXiv:1706.09564v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Pierre-Emmanuel Jabin, Zhenfu Wang

We derive quantitative estimates proving the propagation of chaos for large stochastic systems of interacting particles. We obtain explicit bounds on the relative entropy between the joint law of the particles and the tensorized law at the limit. We have to develop for this new laws of large numbers at the exponential scale. But our result only requires very weak regularity on the interaction kernel in the negative Sobolev space $\dot W^{-1,\infty}$, thus including the Biot-Savart law and the point vortices dynamics for the 2d incompressible Navier-Stokes.


          Perturbations of self-adjoint operators in semifinite von Neumann algebras: Kato-Rosenblum theorem. (arXiv:1706.09566v1 [math.OA])   

Authors: Qihui Li, Junhao Shen, Rui Shi, Liguang Wang

In the paper, we prove an analogue of the Kato-Rosenblum theorem in a semifinite von Neumann algebra. Let $\mathcal{M}$ be a countably decomposable, properly infinite, semifinite von Neumann algebra acting on a Hilbert space $\mathcal{H}$ and let $\tau$ be a faithful normal semifinite tracial weight of $\mathcal M$. Suppose that $H$ and $H_1$ are self-adjoint operators affiliated with $\mathcal{M}$. We show that if $H-H_1$ is in $\mathcal{M}\cap L^{1}\left(\mathcal{M},\tau\right)$, then the ${norm}$ absolutely continuous parts of $H$ and $H_1$ are unitarily equivalent. This implies that the real part of a non-normal hyponormal operator in $\mathcal M$ is not a perturbation by $\mathcal{M}\cap L^{1}\left(\mathcal{M},\tau\right)$ of a diagonal operator. Meanwhile, for $n\ge 2$ and $1\leq p<n$, by modifying Voiculescu's invariant we give examples of commuting $n$-tuples of self-adjoint operators in $\mathcal{M}$ that are not arbitrarily small perturbations of commuting diagonal operators modulo $\mathcal{M}\cap L^{p}\left(\mathcal{M},\tau\right)$.


          An asymptotic preserving scheme for kinetic models with singular limit. (arXiv:1706.09568v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: Alina Chertock, Changhui Tan, Bokai Yan

We propose a new class of asymptotic preserving schemes to solve kinetic equations with mono-kinetic singular limit. The main idea to deal with the singularity is to transform the equations by appropriate scalings in velocity. In particular, we study two biologically related kinetic systems. We derive the scaling factors and prove that the rescaled solution does not have a singular limit, under appropriate spatial non-oscillatory assumptions, which can be verified numerically by a newly developed asymptotic preserving scheme. We set up a few numerical experiments to demonstrate the accuracy, stability, efficiency and asymptotic preserving property of the schemes.


          The round handle problem. (arXiv:1706.09571v1 [math.GT])   

Authors: Min Hoon Kim, Mark Powell, Peter Teichner

We present the Round Handle Problem, proposed by Freedman and Krushkal. It asks whether a collection of links, which contains the Generalised Borromean Rings, are slice in a 4-manifold R constructed from adding round handles to the four ball. A negative answer would contradict the union of the surgery conjecture and the s-cobordism conjecture for 4-manifolds with free fundamental group.


          Solution of Brauer's k(B)-Conjecture for pi-blocks of pi-separable groups. (arXiv:1706.09572v1 [math.RT])   

Authors: Benjamin Sambale

Answering a question of P\'alfy and Pyber, we first prove the following extension of the k(GV)-Problem: Let G be a finite group and A\le Aut(G) such that (|G|,|A|)=1. Then the number of conjugacy classes of the semidirect product GA is at most |G|. As a consequence we verify Brauer's k(B)-Conjecture for pi-blocks of pi-separable groups which was proposed by Y. Liu. On the other hand, we construct a counterexample to a version of Olsson's Conjecture for pi-blocks which was also introduced by Liu.


          Distributive Laws via Admissibility. (arXiv:1706.09575v1 [math.CT])   

Authors: Charles Walker

This paper concerns the problem of lifting a KZ doctrine P to the 2-category of pseudo T-algebras for some pseudomonad T. Here we show that this problem is equivalent to giving a pseudo-distributive law (meaning that the lifted pseudomonad is automatically KZ), and that such distributive laws may be simply described algebraically and are essentially unique (as known to be the case in the (co)KZ over KZ setting).

Moreover, we give a simple description of these distributive laws using Bunge and Funk's notion of admissible morphisms for a KZ doctrine (the principal goal of this paper). We then go on to show that the 2-category of KZ doctrines on a 2-category is biequivalent to a poset.

We will also discuss here the case of lifting a locally fully faithful KZ doctrine, which we noted earlier enjoys most of the axioms of a Yoneda structure, and show that an oplax-lax bijection is exhibited on the lifted 'Yoneda structure' similar to Kelly's doctrinal adjunction. We also briefly discuss how this bijection may be viewed as a coherence result for oplax functors out of the bicategories of spans and polynomials, but leave the details for a future paper.


          Genus one stable quasimap invariants for projective complete intersections. (arXiv:1706.09583v1 [math.AG])   

Authors: Mu-Lin Li

By using the infinitesimally marking point to break the loop in the localization calculation as Kim and Lho, and Zinger's explicit formulas for double $J$-functions, we obtain a formula for genus one stable quasimaps invariants when the target is a complete intersection Calabi-Yau in projective space, which gives a new proof of Kim and Lho's mirror theorem for elliptic quasimap invariants.


          Non-demolition measurements of observables with general spectra. (arXiv:1706.09584v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: M. Ballesteros, N. Crawford, M. Fraas, J. Fröhlich, B. Schubnel

It has recently been established that, in a non-demolition measurement of an observable $\mathcal{N}$ with a finite point spectrum, the density matrix of the system approaches an eigenstate of $\mathcal{N}$, i.e., it "purifies" over the spectrum of $\mathcal{N}$. We extend this result to observables with general spectra. It is shown that the spectral density of the state of the system converges to a delta function exponentially fast, in an appropriate sense. Furthermore, for observables with absolutely continuous spectra, we show that the spectral density approaches a Gaussian distribution over the spectrum of $\mathcal{N}$. Our methods highlight the connection between the theory of non-demolition measurements and classical estimation theory.


          A Study of finitely generated Free Groups via the Fundamental Groups. (arXiv:1706.09594v1 [math.AT])   

Authors: Gongping Niu

Free groups have many applications in Algebraic Topology. In this paper I specifically study the finitely generated free groups by using the covering spaces and fundamental groups. By the Van Kampen's theorem, we have a famous fact that the fundamental group of a wedge sum of circles is a free group. Therefore, to study free groups, we could try to figure out the covering spaces of the wedge sum of circles. And in the appendix B, I prove the Nielsen-Schreier theorem which I will use this to study finitely index subgroups of a finitely generated free group.


          Stable basic sets for finite special linear and unitary group. (arXiv:1706.09595v1 [math.RT])   

Authors: David Denoncin

In this paper we show, using Deligne-Lusztig theory and Kawanaka's theory of generalised Gelfand-Graev representations, that the decomposition matrix of the special linear and unitary group in non defining characteristic can be made unitriangular with respect to a basic set that is stable under the action of automorphisms.


          Isometric immersions into manifolds with metallic structures. (arXiv:1706.09596v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Julien Roth, Abhitosh Upadhyay

We consider submanifolds into Riemannian manifold with metallic structures. We obtain some new results for hypersurfaces in these spaces and we express the fundamental theorem of submanifolds into products spaces in terms of metallic structures. Moreover, we define new structures called complex metallic structures. We show that these structures are linked with complex structures. Then, we consider submanifolds into Riemannian manifold with such structures with a focus on invariant submanifolds and hypersurfaces. We also express in particular the fundamental theorem of submanifolds of complex space form in terms of complex metallic structures.


          Distributed model predictive control for continuous-time nonlinear systems based on suboptimal ADMM. (arXiv:1706.09599v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Anja Bestler, Knut Graichen

The paper presents a distributed model predictive control (DMPC) scheme for continuous-time nonlinear systems based on the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). A stopping criterion in the ADMM algorithm limits the iterations and therefore the required communication effort during the distributed MPC solution at the expense of a suboptimal solution. Stability results are presented for the suboptimal DMPC scheme under two different ADMM convergence assumptions. In particular, it is shown that the required iterations in each ADMM step are bounded, which is also confirmed in simulation studies.


          Dimension bound for badly approximable grids. (arXiv:1706.09600v1 [math.DS])   

Authors: Seonhee Lim, Nicolas de Saxcé, Uri Shapira

We show that for almost any vector $v$ in $\mathbb{R}^n$, for any $\epsilon>0$ there exists $\delta>0$ such that the dimension of the set of vectors $w$ satisfying $\liminf_{k\to\infty} k^{1/n}<kv-w> \ge \epsilon$ (where $<\cdot>$ denotes the distance from the nearest integer), is bounded above by $n-\delta$. This result is obtained as a corollary of a discussion in homogeneous dynamics and the main tool in the proof is a relative version of the principle of uniqueness of measures with maximal entropy.


          Construct SLOCC invariants via square matrix. (arXiv:1706.09604v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Xin-Wei Zha

We define a square matrices, by which some stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) invariants can be obtained. The relation of SLOCC invariants and character polynomial of square matrix are given for three and four qubit states.


          A sharp recovery condition for sparse signals with partial support information via orthogonal matching pursuit. (arXiv:1706.09607v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Huanmin Ge, Wengu Chen

This paper considers the exact recovery of $k$-sparse signals in the noiseless setting and support recovery in the noisy case when some prior information on the support of the signals is available. This prior support consists of two parts. One part is a subset of the true support and another part is outside of the true support. For $k$-sparse signals $\mathbf{x}$ with the prior support which is composed of $g$ true indices and $b$ wrong indices, we show that if the restricted isometry constant (RIC) $\delta_{k+b+1}$ of the sensing matrix $\mathbf{A}$ satisfies \begin{eqnarray*} \delta_{k+b+1}<\frac{1}{\sqrt{k-g+1}}, \end{eqnarray*} then orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm can perfectly recover the signals $\mathbf{x}$ from $\mathbf{y}=\mathbf{Ax}$ in $k-g$ iterations. Moreover, we show the above sufficient condition on the RIC is sharp. In the noisy case, we achieve the exact recovery of the remainder support (the part of the true support outside of the prior support) for the $k$-sparse signals $\mathbf{x}$ from $\mathbf{y}=\mathbf{Ax}+\mathbf{v}$ under appropriate conditions. For the remainder support recovery, we also obtain a necessary condition based on the minimum magnitude of partial nonzero elements of the signals $\mathbf{x}$.


          Recovery of signals by a weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization under arbitrary prior support information. (arXiv:1706.09615v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Wengu Chen, Huanmin Ge

In this paper, we introduce a weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization to recover block sparse signals with arbitrary prior support information. When partial prior support information is available, a sufficient condition based on the high order block RIP is derived to guarantee stable and robust recovery of block sparse signals via the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization. We then show if the accuracy of arbitrary prior block support estimate is at least $50\%$, the sufficient recovery condition by the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_{1}$ minimization is weaker than that by the $\ell_2/\ell_{1}$ minimization, and the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_{1}$ minimization provides better upper bounds on the recovery error in terms of the measurement noise and the compressibility of the signal. Moreover, we illustrate the advantages of the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization approach in the recovery performance of block sparse signals under uniform and non-uniform prior information by extensive numerical experiments. The significance of the results lies in the facts that making explicit use of block sparsity and partial support information of block sparse signals can achieve better recovery performance than handling the signals as being in the conventional sense, thereby ignoring the additional structure and prior support information in the problem.


          Standing waves for the NLS on the double-bridge graph and a rational-irrational dichotomy. (arXiv:1706.09616v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Diego Noja, Sergio Rolando, Simone Secchi

We study a boundary value problem related to the search of standing waves for the nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation (NLS) on graphs. Precisely we are interested in characterizing the standing waves of NLS posed on the {\it double-bridge graph}, in which two semi-infinite half-lines are attached at a circle at different vertices. At the two vertices the so-called Kirchhoff boundary conditions are imposed. The configuration of the graph is characterized by two lengths, $L_1$ and $L_2$, and we are interested in the existence and properties of standing waves of given frequency $\omega$. For every $\omega>0$ only solutions supported on the circle exist (cnoidal solutions), and only for a rational value of $L_1/L_2$; they can be extended to every $\omega\in \mathbb{R}$. We study, for $\omega<0$, the solutions periodic on the circle but with nontrivial components on the half-lines. The problem turns out to be equivalent to a nonlinear boundary value problem in which the boundary condition depends on the spectral parameter $\omega$. After classifying the solutions with rational $L_1/L_2$, we turn to $L_1/L_2$ irrational showing that there exist standing waves only in correspondence to a countable set of frequencies $\omega_n$. Moreover we show that the frequency sequence $\{\omega_n\}_{n \geq 1}$ has a cluster point at $-\infty$ and it admits at least a finite limit point, in general non-zero. Finally, any negative real number can be a limit point of a set of admitted frequencies up to the choice of a suitable irrational geometry $L_1/L_2$ for the graph. These results depend on basic properties of diophantine approximation of real numbers.


          Homogeneous manifolds whose geodesics are orbits. Recent results and some open problems. (arXiv:1706.09618v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Andreas Arvanitoyeorgos

A homogeneous Riemannian manifold $(M=G/K, g)$ is called a space with homogeneous geodesics or a $G$-g.o. space if every geodesic $\gamma (t)$ of $M$ is an orbit of a one-parameter subgroup of $G$, that is $\gamma(t) = \exp(tX)\cdot o$, for some non zero vector $X$ in the Lie algebra of $G$. We give an exposition on the subject, by presenting techniques that have been used so far and a wide selection of previous and recent results.

We also present some open problems.


          On the isoperimetric problem with perimeter density r^p. (arXiv:1706.09619v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Gyula Csato

In this paper the author studies the isoperimetric problem in $\re^n$ with perimeter density $|x|^p$ and volume density $1.$ We settle completely the case $n=2,$ completing a previous work by the author: we characterize the case of equality if $0\leq p\leq 1$ and deal with the case $-\infty<p<-1$ (with the additional assumption $0\in\Omega$). In the case $n\geq 3$ we deal mainly with the case $-\infty<p<0,$ showing among others that the results in $2$ dimensions do not generalize for the range $-n+1<p<0.$


          Simultaneous Lightwave Information and Power Transfer (SLIPT) for Indoor IoT Applications. (arXiv:1706.09624v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Panagiotis D. Diamantoulakis, George K. Karagiannidis

We present the concept of Simultaneous Lightwave Information and Power Transfer (SLIPT) for indoor Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications. Specifically, we propose novel and fundamental SLIPT strategies, which can be implemented through Visible Light or Infrared communication systems, equipped with a simple solar panel-based receiver. These strategies are performed at the transmitter or at the receiver, or at both sides, named Adjusting transmission, Adjusting reception and Coordinated adjustment of transmission and reception, correspondingly. Furthermore, we deal with the fundamental trade-off between harvested energy and quality-of-service (QoS), by maximizing the harvested energy, while achieving the required user's QoS. To this end, two optimization problems are formulated and optimally solved. Computer simulations validate the optimum solutions and reveal that the proposed strategies considerably increase the harvested energy, compared to SLIPT with fixed policies.


          Quantum Bernstein's Theorem and the Hyperoctahedral Quantum Group. (arXiv:1706.09629v1 [math.OA])   

Authors: Paweł Józiak, Kamil Szpojankowski

We study an extension of Bernstein's theorem to the setting of quantum groups. For a d-tuple of free, identically distributed random variables we consider a problem of preservation of freeness under the action of a quantum subset of the free orthogonal quantum group. For a subset not contained in the hyperoctahedral quantum group we prove that preservation of freeness characterizes Wigner's semicircle law. We show that freeness is always preserved if the quantum subset is contained in the hyperoctahedral quantum group. We provide examples of quantum subsets which show that our result is an extension of results known in the literature.


          Finite element approximation of a sharp interface approach for gradient flow dynamics of two-phase biomembranes. (arXiv:1706.09631v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: John W. Barrett, Harald Garcke, Robert Nürnberg

A finite element method for the evolution of a two-phase membrane in a sharp interface formulation is introduced. The evolution equations are given as an $L^2$--gradient flow of an energy involving an elastic bending energy and a line energy. In the two phases Helfrich-type evolution equations are prescribed, and on the interface, an evolving curve on an evolving surface, highly nonlinear boundary conditions have to hold. Here we consider both $C^0$-- and $C^1$--matching conditions for the surface at the interface. A new weak formulation is introduced, allowing for a stable semidiscrete parametric finite element approximation of the governing equations. In addition, we show existence and uniqueness for a fully discrete version of the scheme. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the approach can deal with a multitude of geometries. In particular, the paper shows the first computations based on a sharp interface description, which are not restricted to the axisymmetric case.


          Compact Cardinals and Eight Values in Cicho\'n's Diagram. (arXiv:1706.09638v1 [math.LO])   

Authors: Jakob Kellner, Anda Tănasie, Fabio Tonti

Assuming three strongly compact cardinals, it is consistent that \[ \aleph_1 < \mathrm{add}(\mathrm{null}) < \mathrm{cov}(\mathrm{null}) < \mathfrak{b} < \mathfrak{d} < \mathrm{non}(\mathrm{null}) < \mathrm{cof}(\mathrm{null}) < 2^{\aleph_0}.\] Under the same assumption, it is consistent that \[ \aleph_1 < \mathrm{add}(\mathrm{null}) < \mathrm{cov}(\mathrm{null}) < \mathrm{non}(\mathrm{meager}) < \mathrm{cov}(\mathrm{meager}) < \mathrm{non}(\mathrm{null}) < \mathrm{cof}(\mathrm{null}) < 2^{\aleph_0}.\]


          On magic factors in Stein's method for compound Poisson approximation. (arXiv:1706.09642v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Fraser Daly

One major obstacle in applications of Stein's method for compound Poisson approximation is the availability of so-called magic factors (bounds on the solution of the Stein equation) with favourable dependence on the parameters of the approximating compound Poisson random variable. In general, the best such bounds have an exponential dependence on these parameters, though in certain situations better bounds are available. In this paper, we extend the region for which well-behaved magic factors are available for compound Poisson approximation in the Kolmogorov metric, allowing useful compound Poisson approximation theorems to be established in some regimes where they were previously unavailable. To illustrate the advantages offered by these new bounds, we consider applications to runs, reliability systems, Poisson mixtures and sums of independent random variables.


          Central limit theorem and Diophantine approximations. (arXiv:1706.09643v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Sergey G. Bobkov

Let $F_n$ denote the distribution function of the normalized sum $Z_n = (X_1 + \dots + X_n)/\sigma\sqrt{n}$ of i.i.d. random variables with finite fourth absolute moment. In this paper, polynomial rates of convergence of $F_n$ to the normal law with respect to the Kolmogorov distance, as well as polynomial approximations of $F_n$ by the Edgeworth corrections (modulo logarithmically growing factors in $n$) are given in terms of the characteristic function of $X_1$. Particular cases of the problem are discussed in connection with Diophantine approximations.


          Accelerated nonlocal nonsymmetric dispersion for monostable equations on the real line. (arXiv:1706.09647v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Dmitri Finkelshtein, Pasha Tkachov

We consider the accelerated propagation of solutions to equations with a nonlocal linear dispersion on the real line and monostable nonlinearities (both local or nonlocal), in the case when either of the dispersion kernel or the initial condition has regularly heavy tails at both $\pm\infty$, perhaps different. We show that, in such case, the propagation to the right direction is fully determined by the right tails of either the kernel or the initial condition. We describe both cases of integrable and monotone initial conditions which may give different orders of the acceleration. Our approach is based, in particular, on the extension of the theory of sub-exponential distributions, which we introduced early in arXiv:1704.05829 [math.PR].


          Counting chambers in restricted Coxeter arrangements. (arXiv:1706.09649v1 [math.CO])   

Authors: Tilman Moeller, Gerhard Roehrle

Solomon showed that the Poincar\'e polynomial of a Coxeter group $W$ satisfies a product decomposition depending on the exponents of $W$. This polynomial coincides with the rank-generating function of the poset of regions of the underlying Coxeter arrangement. In this note we determine all instances when the analogous factorization property of the rank-generating function of the poset of regions holds for a restriction of a Coxeter arrangement. It turns out that this is always the case with the exception of some instances in type $E_8$.


          Forward Backward Stochastic Differential Equation Games with Delay and Noisy Memory. (arXiv:1706.09651v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Kristina Rognlien Dahl

The main goal of this paper is to study a stochastic game connected to a system of forward backward stochastic differential equations (FBSDEs) involving delay and so-called noisy memory. We derive suffcient and necessary maximum principles for a set of controls for the players to be a Nash equilibrium in such a game. Furthermore, we study a corresponding FBSDE involving Malliavin derivatives, which (to the best of our knowledge) is a kind of equation which has not been studied before. The maximum principles give conditions for determining the Nash equilibrium of the game. We use this to derive a closed form Nash equilibrium for a specifc model in economics where the players aim to maximize their consumption with respect recursive utility.


          Relaxation of nonlinear elastic energies involving deformed configuration and applications to nematic elastomers. (arXiv:1706.09653v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Carlos Mora-Corral, Marcos Oliva

We start from a variational model for nematic elastomers that involves two energies: mechanical and nematic. The first one consists of a nonlinear elastic energy which is influenced by the orientation of the molecules of the nematic elastomer. The nematic energy is an Oseen--Frank energy in the deformed configuration. The constraint of the positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient is imposed. The functionals are not assumed to have the usual polyconvexity or quasiconvexity assumptions to be lower semicontinuous. We instead compute its relaxation, that is, the lower semicontinuous envelope, which turns out to be the quasiconvexification of the mechanical term plus the tangential quasiconvexification of the nematic term. The main assumptions are that the quasiconvexification of the mechanical term is polyconvex and that the deformation is in the Sobolev space $W^{1,p}$ (with $p>n-1$ and $n$ the dimension of the space) and does not present cavitation.


          Management of a hydropower system via convex duality. (arXiv:1706.09655v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Kristina Rognlien Dahl

We consider the problem of managing a hydroelectric power plant system. The system consists of N hydropower dams, which all have some maximum production capacity. The inflow to the system is some stochastic process, representing the precipitation to each dam. The manager can control how much water to release from each dam at each time. She would like to choose this in a way which maximizes the total revenue from the initial time 0 to some terminal time T. The total revenue of the hydropower dam system depends on the price of electricity, which is also a stochastic process. The manager must take this price process into account when controlling the draining process. However, we assume that the manager only has partial information of how the price process is formed. She can observe the price, but not the underlying processes determining it. By using the conjugate duality framework of Rockafellar, we derive a dual problem to the problem of the manager. This dual problem turns out to be simple to solve in the case where the price process is a martingale or submartingale with respect to the filtration modelling the information of the dam manager.


          Asymptotics for the Discrete-Time Average of the Geometric Brownian Motion and Asian Options. (arXiv:1706.09659v1 [q-fin.PR])   

Authors: Dan Pirjol, Lingjiong Zhu

The time average of geometric Brownian motion plays a crucial role in the pricing of Asian options in mathematical finance. In this paper we consider the asymptotics of the discrete-time average of a geometric Brownian motion sampled on uniformly spaced times in the limit of a very large number of averaging time steps. We derive almost sure limit, fluctuations, large deviations, and also the asymptotics of the moment generating function of the average. Based on these results, we derive the asymptotics for the price of Asian options with discrete-time averaging in the Black-Scholes model, with both fixed and floating strike.


          CLT for fluctuations of $\beta$-ensembles with general potential. (arXiv:1706.09663v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: Florent Bekerman, Thomas Leblé, Sylvia Serfaty

We prove a central limit theorem for the linear statistics of one-dimensional log-gases, or $\beta$-ensembles. We use a method based on a change of variables which allows to treat fairly general situations, including multi-cut and, for the first time, critical cases, and generalizes the previously known results of Johansson, Borot-Guionnet and Shcherbina. In the one-cut regular case, our approach also allows to retrieve a rate of convergence as well as previously known expansions of the free energy to arbitrary order.


          Hadamard States From Light-like Hypersurfaces. (arXiv:1706.09666v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: Claudio Dappiaggi, Valter Moretti, Nicola Pinamonti

This book provides a rather self-contained survey of the construction of Hadamard states for scalar field theories in a large class of notable spacetimes, possessing a (conformal) light-like boundary. The first two sections focus on explaining a few introductory aspects of this topic and on providing the relevant geometric background material. The notions of asymptotically flat spacetimes and of expanding universes with a cosmological horizon are analysed in detail, devoting special attention to the characterization of asymptotic symmetries. In the central part of the book, the quantization of a real scalar field theory on such class of backgrounds is discussed within the framework of algebraic quantum field theory. Subsequently it is explained how it is possible to encode the information of the observables of the theory in a second, ancillary counterpart, which is built directly on the conformal (null) boundary. This procedure, dubbed bulk-to-boundary correspondence, has the net advantage of allowing the identification of a distinguished state for the theory on the boundary, which admits a counterpart in the bulk spacetime which is automatically of Hadamard form. In the last part of the book, some applications of these states are discussed, in particular the construction of the algebra of Wick polynomials. This book is aimed mainly, but not exclusively, at a readership with interest in the mathematical formulation of quantum field theory on curved backgrounds.


          Comparing Information-Theoretic Measures of Complexity in Boltzmann Machines. (arXiv:1706.09667v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Maxinder S. Kanwal, Joshua A. Grochow, Nihat Ay

In the past three decades, many theoretical measures of complexity have been proposed to help understand complex systems. In this work, for the first time, we place these measures on a level playing field, to explore the qualitative similarities and differences between them, and their shortcomings. Specifically, using the Boltzmann machine architecture (a fully connected recurrent neural network) with uniformly distributed weights as our model of study, we numerically measure how complexity changes as a function of network dynamics and network parameters. We apply an extension of one such information-theoretic measure of complexity to understand incremental Hebbian learning in Hopfield networks, a fully recurrent architecture model of autoassociative memory. In the course of Hebbian learning, the total information flow reflects a natural upward trend in complexity as the network attempts to learn more and more patterns.


          Thermal conductivity for a system of harmonic oscillators in a magnetic field with noise. (arXiv:1706.09668v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Keiji Saito, Makiko Sasada

We introduce a system of harmonic oscillators in a magnetic field perturbed by a stochastic dynamics conserving energy but not canonical momentum. We show that its thermal conductivity diverges in dimension 1 and 2, while it remains finite in dimension 3. We compute the current-current time correlation function, that decays like $t^{-\frac{1}{2}-\frac{d}{4}}$. This implies a finite conductivity in $d \ge 3$. For $d=1$, this order of the decay is different from the one without the magnetic field. This is the first rigorous result showing the macroscopic super-diffusive behavior of energy for a microscopic model without conservation of canonical momentum.


          Finite element approximations of minimal surfaces: algorithms and mesh refinement. (arXiv:1706.09672v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: Aymeric Grodet, Takuya Tsuchiya

Finite element approximations of minimal surface are not always precise. They can even sometimes completely collapse. In this paper, we provide a simple and inexpensive method, in terms of computational cost, to improve finite element approximations of minimal surfaces by local boundary mesh refinements. By highlighting the fact that a collapse is simply the limit case of a locally bad approximation, we show that our method can also be used to avoid the collapse of finite element approximations. We also extend the study of such approximations to partially free boundary problems and give a theorem for their convergence. Numerical examples showing improvements induced by the method are given throughout the paper.


          Depth and regularity modulo a principal ideal. (arXiv:1706.09675v1 [math.AC])   

Authors: Giulio Caviglia, Huy Tai Ha, Jürgen Herzog, Manoj Kummini, Naoki Terai, Ngo Viet Trung

We study the relationship between depth and regularity of a homogeneous ideal I and those of (I,f) and I:f, where f is a linear form or a monomial. Our results has several interesting consequences on depth and regularity of edge ideals of hypegraphs and of powers of ideals.


          A graph-theoretic proof for Whitehead's second free-group algorithm. (arXiv:1706.09679v1 [math.GR])   

Authors: Warren Dicks

J.H.C. Whitehead's second free-group algorithm determines whether or not two given elements of a free group lie in the same orbit of the automorphism group of the free group. The algorithm involves certain connected graphs, and Whitehead used three-manifold models to prove their connectedness; later, Rapaport and Higgins & Lyndon gave group-theoretic proofs. Combined work of Gersten, Stallings, and Hoare showed that the three-manifold models may be viewed as graphs. We give the direct translation of Whitehead's topological argument into the language of graph theory.


          M\"obius orthogonality for the Zeckendorf sum-of-digits function. (arXiv:1706.09680v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Michael Drmota, Clemens Müllner, Lukas Spiegelhofer

We show that the (morphic) sequence $(-1)^{s_\varphi(n)}$ is asymptotically orthogonal to all bounded multiplicative functions, where $s_\varphi$ denotes the Zeckendorf sum-of-digits function. In particular we have $\sum_{n<N} (-1)^{s_\varphi(n)} \mu(n) = o(N)$, that is, this sequence satisfies the Sarnak conjecture.


          Extended degenerate Stirling numbers of the second kind and extended degenerate Bell polynomials. (arXiv:1706.09681v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Taekyun Kim, Dae San Kim

In a recent work, the degenerate Stirling polynomials of the second kind were studied by T. Kim. In this paper, we investigate the extended degenerate Stirling numbers of the second kind and the extended degenerate Bell polynomials associated with them. As results, we give some expressions, identities and properties about the extended degener- ate Stirling numbers of the second kind and the extended degenerate Bell polynomials.


          Up and down grover walks on simplicial complexes. (arXiv:1706.09682v1 [math.SP])   

Authors: Xin Luo, Tatsuya Tate

A notion of up and down Grover walks on simplicial complexes are proposed and their properties are investigated. These are abstract Szegedy walks, which is a special kind of unitary operators on a Hilbert space. The operators introduced in the present paper are usual Grover walks on graphs defined by using combinatorial structures of simplicial complexes. But the shift operators are modified so that it can contain information of orientations of each simplex in the simplicial complex. It is well-known that the spectral structures of this kind of unitary operators are completely determined by its discriminant operators. It has strong relationship with combinatorial Laplacian on simplicial complexes and geometry, even topology, of simplicial complexes. In particular, theorems on a relation between spectrum of up and down discriminants and orientability, on a relation between symmetry of spectrum of discriminants and combinatorial structure of simplicial complex are given. Some examples, both of finite and infinite simplicial complexes, are also given. Finally, some aspects of finding probability and stationary measures are discussed.


          Discontinuous Skeletal Gradient Discretisation Methods on polytopal meshes. (arXiv:1706.09683v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: Daniele A. Di Pietro, Jérôme Droniou, Gianmarco Manzini

In this work we develop arbitrary-order Discontinuous Skeletal Gradient Discretisations (DSGD) on general polytopal meshes. Discontinuous Skeletal refers to the fact that the globally coupled unknowns are broken polynomial on the mesh skeleton. The key ingredient is a high-order gradient reconstruction composed of two terms: (i) a consistent contribution obtained mimicking an integration by parts formula inside each element and (ii) a stabilising term for which sufficient design conditions are provided. An example of stabilisation that satisfies the design conditions is proposed based on a local lifting of high-order residuals on a Raviart-Thomas-N\'ed\'elec subspace. We prove that the novel DSGDs satisfy coercivity, consistency, limit-conformity, and compactness requirements that ensure convergence for a variety of elliptic and parabolic problems. Links with Hybrid High-Order, non-conforming Mimetic Finite Difference and non-conforming Virtual Element methods are also studied. Numerical examples complete the exposition.


          Plane Graphs are Facially-non-repetitively $10^{4 \cdot10^7}$-Choosable. (arXiv:1706.09685v1 [math.CO])   

Authors: Grzegorz Gutowski

A sequence $\left(x_1,x_2,\ldots,x_{2n}\right)$ of even length is a repetition if $\left(x_1,\ldots,x_n\right) = \left(x_{n+1},\ldots,x_{2n}\right)$. We prove existence of a constant $C < 10^{4 \cdot 10^7}$ such that given any planar drawing of a graph $G$, and a list $L(v)$ of $C$ permissible colors for each vertex $v$ in $G$, there is a choice of a permissible color for each vertex such that the sequence of colors of the vertices on any facial simple path in $G$ is not a repetition.


          Power-Based Direction-of-Arrival Estimation Using a Single Multi-Mode Antenna. (arXiv:1706.09690v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Robert Pöhlmann, Siwei Zhang, Thomas Jost, Armin Dammann

Phased antenna arrays are widely used for direction-of-arrival (DoA) estimation. For low-cost applications, signal power or received signal strength indicator (RSSI) based approaches can be an alternative. However, they usually require multiple antennas, a single antenna that can be rotated, or switchable antenna beams. In this paper we show how a multi-mode antenna (MMA) can be used for power-based DoA estimation. Only a single MMA is needed and neither rotation nor switching of antenna beams is required. We derive an estimation scheme as well as theoretical bounds and validate them through simulations. It is found that power-based DoA estimation with an MMA is feasible and accurate.


          Enlargement of (fibered) derivators. (arXiv:1706.09692v1 [math.CT])   

Authors: Fritz Hörmann

We show that the theory of derivators (or, more generally, of fibered multiderivators) on all small categories is equivalent to this theory on partially ordered sets, in the following sense: Every derivator (more generally, every fibered multiderivator) defined on partially ordered sets has an enlargement to all small categories that is unique up to equivalence of derivators. Furthermore, extending a theorem of Cisinski, we show that every bifibration of multi-model categories (basically a collection of model categories, and Quillen adjunctions in several variables between them) gives rise to a left and right fibered multiderivator on all small categories.


          Introduction to exterior differential systems. (arXiv:1706.09697v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Benjamin McKay (University College Cork)

A brief introduction to exterior differential systems for graduate students familiar with manifolds and differential forms.


          Nonnegative Factorization of a Data Matrix as a Motivational Example for Basic Linear Algebra. (arXiv:1706.09699v1 [math.HO])   

Authors: Barak A. Pearlmutter, Helena Šmigoc

We present a motivating example for matrix multiplication based on factoring a data matrix. Traditionally, matrix multiplication is motivated by applications in physics: composing rigid transformations, scaling, sheering, etc. We present an engaging modern example which naturally motivates a variety of matrix manipulations, and a variety of different ways of viewing matrix multiplication. We exhibit a low-rank non-negative decomposition (NMF) of a "data matrix" whose entries are word frequencies across a corpus of documents. We then explore the meaning of the entries in the decomposition, find natural interpretations of intermediate quantities that arise in several different ways of writing the matrix product, and show the utility of various matrix operations. This example gives the students a glimpse of the power of an advanced linear algebraic technique used in modern data science.


          A rescaled expansiveness for flows. (arXiv:1706.09702v1 [math.DS])   

Authors: Xiao Wen, Lan Wen

We introduce a new version of expansiveness for flows. Let $M$ be a compact Riemannian manifold without boundary and $X$ be a $C^1$ vector field on $M$ that generates a flow $\varphi_t$ on $M$. We call $X$ {\it rescaling expansive} on a compact invariant set $\Lambda$ of $X$ if for any $\epsilon>0$ there is $\delta>0$ such that, for any $x,y\in \Lambda$ and any time reparametrization $\theta:\mathbb{R}\to \mathbb{R}$, if $d(\varphi_t(x), \varphi_{\theta(t)}(y)\le \delta\|X(\varphi_t(x))\|$ for all $t\in \mathbb R$, then $\varphi_{\theta(t)}(y)\in \varphi_{[-\epsilon, \epsilon]}(\varphi_t(x))$ for all $t\in \mathbb R$. We prove that every multisingular hyperbolic set (singular hyperbolic set in particular) is rescaling expansive and a converse holds generically.


          Stability Region Estimation Under Low Voltage Ride Through Constraints using Sum of Squares. (arXiv:1706.09703v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Chetan Mishra, James S. Thorp, Virgilio A. Centeno, Anamitra Pal

The increasing penetration of inverter based renewable generation (RG) in the form of solar photo-voltaic (PV) or wind has introduced numerous operational challenges and uncertainties. According to the standards, these generators are made to trip offline if their operating requirements are not met. In an RG-rich system, this might alter the system dynamics and/or cause shifting of the equilibrium points to the extent that a cascaded tripping scenario is manifested. The present work attempts at avoiding such scenarios by estimating the constrained stability region (CSR) inside which the system must operate using maximal level set of a Lyapunov function estimated through sum of squares (SOS) technique. A time-independent conservative approximation of the LVRT constraint is initially derived for a classical model of the power system. The proposed approach is eventually validated by evaluating the stability of a 3 machine test system with trip-able RG.


          On the growth of Sobolev norms for a class of linear Schr\"odinger equations on the torus with superlinear dispersion. (arXiv:1706.09704v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Riccardo Montalto

In this paper we consider time dependent Schr\"odinger equations on the one-dimensional torus $\T := \R /(2 \pi \Z)$ of the form $\partial_t u = \ii {\cal V}(t)[u]$ where ${\cal V}(t)$ is a time dependent, self-adjoint pseudo-differential operator of the form ${\cal V}(t) = V(t, x) |D|^M + {\cal W}(t)$, $M > 1$, $|D| := \sqrt{- \partial_{xx}}$, $V$ is a smooth function uniformly bounded from below and ${\cal W}$ is a time-dependent pseudo-differential operator of order strictly smaller than $M$. We prove that the solutions of the Schr\"odinger equation $\partial_t u = \ii {\cal V}(t)[u]$ grow at most as $t^\e$, $t \to + \infty$ for any $\e > 0$. The proof is based on a reduction to constant coefficients up to smoothing remainders of the vector field $\ii {\cal V}(t)$ which uses Egorov type theorems and pseudo-differential calculus.


          Composition of Gray Isometries. (arXiv:1706.09705v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Sierra Marie M. Lauresta, Virgilio P. Sison

In classical coding theory, Gray isometries are usually defined as mappings between finite Frobenius rings, which include the ring $Z_m$ of integers modulo $m$, and the finite fields. In this paper, we derive an isometric mapping from $Z_8$ to $Z_4^2$ from the composition of the Gray isometries on $Z_8$ and on $Z_4^2$. The image under this composition of a $Z_8$-linear block code of length $n$ with homogeneous distance $d$ is a (not necessarily linear) quaternary block code of length $2n$ with Lee distance $d$.


          Growth of Sobolev norms for abstract linear Schr\"odinger Equations. (arXiv:1706.09708v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Dario Bambusi, Benoit Grébert, Alberto Maspero, Didier Robert

We prove an abstract theorem giving a $\langle t\rangle^\epsilon$ bound ($\forall \epsilon>0$) on the growth of the Sobolev norms in linear Schr\"odinger equations of the form $i \dot \psi = H_0 \psi + V(t) \psi $ when the time $t \to \infty$. The abstract theorem is applied to several cases, including the cases where (i) $H_0$ is the Laplace operator on a Zoll manifold and $V(t)$ a pseudodifferential operator of order smaller then 2; (ii) $H_0$ is the (resonant or nonresonant) Harmonic oscillator in $R^d$ and $V(t)$ a pseudodifferential operator of order smaller then $H_0$ depending in a quasiperiodic way on time. The proof is obtained by first conjugating the system to some normal form in which the perturbation is a smoothing operator and then applying the results of \cite{MaRo}.


          Topology Reconstruction of Dynamical Networks via Constrained Lyapunov Equations. (arXiv:1706.09709v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Henk J. van Waarde, Pietro Tesi, M. Kanat Camlibel

The network structure (or topology) of a dynamical network is often unavailable or uncertain. Hence, in this paper we consider the problem of network reconstruction. Network reconstruction aims at inferring the topology of a dynamical network using measurements obtained from the network. This paper rigorously defines what is meant by solvability of the network reconstruction problem. Subsequently, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions under which the network reconstruction problem is solvable. Finally, using constrained Lyapunov equations, we establish novel network reconstruction algorithms, applicable to general dynamical networks. We also provide specialized algorithms for specific network dynamics, such as the well-known consensus and adjacency dynamics.


          Cohomogeneity one Ricci Solitons from Hopf Fibrations. (arXiv:1706.09712v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Matthias Wink

This paper studies cohomogeneity one Ricci solitons. If the isotropy representation of the principal orbit $G/K$ consists of two inequivalent $Ad_K$-invariant irreducible summands, the existence of parameter families of non-homothetic complete steady and expanding Ricci solitons on non-trivial bundles is shown. These examples were detected numerically by Buzano-Dancer-Gallaugher-Wang. The analysis of the corresponding Ricci flat trajectories is used to reconstruct Einstein metrics of positive scalar curvature due to B\"ohm. The techniques also yield unifying proofs for the existence of $m$-quasi-Einstein metrics.


          Independence characterization for Wishart and Kummer matrices. (arXiv:1706.09718v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Agnieszka Piliszek

We generalize the following univariate characterization of Kummer and Gamma distributions to the cone of symmetric positive definite matrices: let $X$ and $Y$ be independent, non-degenerate random variables valued in $(0, \infty)$, then $U= Y/(1+X)$ and $V = X(1+U)$ are independent if and only if $X$ follows the Kummer distribution and $Y$ follows the the Gamma distribution with appropriate parameters. We solve a related functional equation in the cone of symmetric positive definite matrices, which is our first main result and apply its solution to prove the characterization theorem, which is our second main result.


          Hausdorff Dimension of the Record Set of a Fractional Brownian. (arXiv:1706.09726v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Lucas Benigni, Clément Cosco, Assaf Shapira, Kay Jörg Wiese

We prove that the Hausdorff dimension of the record set of a fractional Brownian motion with Hurst parameter $H$ equals $H$.


          Stein approximation for functionals of independent random sequences. (arXiv:1706.09728v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Nicolas Privault, Grzegorz Serafin

We derive Stein approximation bounds for functionals of uniform random variables, using chaos expansions and the Clark-Ocone representation formula combined with derivation and finite difference operators. This approach covers sums and functionals of both continuous and discrete independent random variables. For random variables admitting a continuous density, it recovers classical distance bounds based on absolute third moments, with better and explicit constants. We also apply this method to multiple stochastic integrals that can be used to represent U-statistics, and include linear and quadratic functionals as particular cases.


          On arithmetic of one class of plane maps. (arXiv:1706.09738v1 [math.CO])   

Authors: Yury Kochetkov

We study bipartite maps on the plane with one infinite face and one face of perimeter 2. At first we consider the problem of their enumeration an then study the connection between the combinatorial structure of a map and the degree of its definition field. The second problem is considered, when the number of edges is $p+1$, where $p$ is a prime.


          A new reason for doubting the Riemann hypothesis. (arXiv:1706.09740v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Philippe Blanc

We make plausible the existence of counterexamples to the Riemann hypothesis located in the neighbourhood of unusually large peaks of $\vert \zeta \vert$. The main ingredient in our argument is an identity which links the zeros of a function $f$ defined on the interval $[-a,a]$ and the values of its derivatives of odd order at $\pm a$.


          From Individual Motives to Partial Consensus: A Dynamic Game Model. (arXiv:1706.09741v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Muhammad Umar B. Niazi, Arif Bülent Özgüler

A noncooperative differential (dynamic) game model of opinion dynamics, where the agents' motives are shaped by how susceptible they are to get influenced by others, how stubborn they are, and how quick they are willing to change their opinions on a set of issues in a prescribed time interval is considered. We prove that a unique Nash equilibrium exists in the game if there is a harmony of views among the agents of the network. The harmony may be in the form of similarity in pairwise conceptions about the issues but may also be a collective agreement on the status of a "leader" in the network. The existence of a Nash equilibrium can be interpreted as an emergent collective behavior out of the local interaction rules and individual motives.


          Littlewood-Paley-Stein operators on Damek-Ricci spaces. (arXiv:1706.09743v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Anestis Fotiadis, Effie Papageorgiou

We obtain pointwise upper bounds on the derivatives of the heat kernel on Damek-Ricci spaces. Applying these estimates we prove the $L^p$-boundedness of Littlewood-Paley-Stein operators.


          Filter Bank Multicarrier in Massive MIMO: Analysis and Channel Equalization. (arXiv:1706.09744v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Amir Aminjavaheri, Arman Farhang, Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny

We perform an asymptotic study of the performance of filter bank multicarrier (FBMC) in the context of massive multi-input multi-output (MIMO). We show that the effects of channel distortions, i.e., intersymbol interference and intercarrier interference, do not vanish as the base station (BS) array size increases. As a result, the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) cannot grow unboundedly by increasing the number of BS antennas, and is upper bounded by a certain deterministic value. We show that this phenomenon is a result of the correlation between the multi-antenna combining tap values and the channel impulse responses between the mobile terminals and the BS antennas. To resolve this problem, we introduce an efficient equalization method that removes this correlation, enabling us to achieve arbitrarily large SINR values by increasing the number of BS antennas. We perform a thorough analysis of the proposed system and find analytical expressions for both equalizer coefficients and the respective SINR.


          The Albanese Map of sGG Manifolds and Self-Duality of the Iwasawa Manifold. (arXiv:1706.09747v1 [math.AG])   

Authors: Dan Popovici

We prove that the three-dimensional Iwasawa manifold $X$, viewed as a locally holomorphically trivial fibration by elliptic curves over its two-dimensional Albanese torus, is self-dual in the sense that the base torus identifies canonically with its dual torus under a sesquilinear duality, the Jacobian torus of $X$, while the fibre identifies with itself. To this end, we derive elements of Hodge theory for arbitrary sGG manifolds, introduced in earlier joint work of the author with L. Ugarte, to construct in an explicit way the Albanese torus and map of any sGG manifold. These definitions coincide with the classical ones in the special K\"ahler and $\partial\bar\partial$ cases. The generalisation to the larger sGG class is made necessary by the Iwasawa manifold being an sGG, non-$\partial\bar\partial$, manifold. The main result of this paper can be seen as a complement from a different perspective to the author's very recent work where a non-K\"ahler mirror symmetry of the Iwasawa manifold was emphasised. We also hope that it will suggest yet another approach to non-K\"ahler mirror symmetry for different classes of manifolds.


          On Sampling Edges Almost Uniformly. (arXiv:1706.09748v1 [cs.CC])   

Authors: Talya Eden, Will Rosenbaum

We consider the problem of sampling an edge almost uniformly from an unknown graph, $G = (V, E)$. Access to the graph is provided via queries of the following types: (1) uniform vertex queries, (2) degree queries, and (3) neighbor queries. We describe an algorithm that returns a random edge $e \in E$ using $\tilde{O}(n / \sqrt{\varepsilon m})$ queries in expectation, where $n = |V|$ is the number of vertices, and $m = |E|$ is the number of edges, such that each edge $e$ is sampled with probability $(1 \pm \varepsilon)/m$. We prove that our algorithm is optimal in the sense that any algorithm that samples an edge from an almost-uniform distribution must perform $\Omega(n / \sqrt{m})$ queries.


          Bounds on Information Combining With Quantum Side Information. (arXiv:1706.09752v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Christoph Hirche, David Reeb

"Bounds on information combining" are entropic inequalities that determine how the information (entropy) of a set of random variables can change when these are combined in certain prescribed ways. Such bounds play an important role in classical information theory, particularly in coding and Shannon theory; entropy power inequalities are special instances of them. The arguably most elementary kind of information combining is the addition of two binary random variables (a CNOT gate), and the resulting quantities play an important role in Belief propagation and Polar coding. We investigate this problem in the setting where quantum side information is available, which has been recognized as a hard setting for entropy power inequalities.

Our main technical result is a non-trivial, and close to optimal, lower bound on the combined entropy, which can be seen as an almost optimal "quantum Mrs. Gerber's Lemma". Our proof uses three main ingredients: (1) a new bound on the concavity of von Neumann entropy, which is tight in the regime of low pairwise state fidelities; (2) the quantitative improvement of strong subadditivity due to Fawzi-Renner, in which we manage to handle the minimization over recovery maps; (3) recent duality results on classical-quantum-channels due to Renes et al. We furthermore present conjectures on the optimal lower and upper bounds under quantum side information, supported by interesting analytical observations and strong numerical evidence.

We finally apply our bounds to Polar coding for binary-input classical-quantum channels, and show the following three results: (A) Even non-stationary channels polarize under the polar transform. (B) The blocklength required to approach the symmetric capacity scales at most sub-exponentially in the gap to capacity. (C) Under the aforementioned lower bound conjecture, a blocklength polynomial in the gap suffices.


          An explicit formula for Szego kernels on the Heisenberg group. (arXiv:1706.09762v1 [math.CV])   

Authors: Hendrik Herrmann, Chin-Yu Hsiao, Xiaoshan Li

In this paper, we give an explicit formula for the Szego kernel for $(0, q)$ forms on the Heisenberg group $H_{n+1}$.


          Multi-tap Digital Canceller for Full-Duplex Applications. (arXiv:1706.09764v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Paul Ferrand, Melissa Duarte

We identify phase noise as a bottleneck for the performance of digital self-interference cancellers that utilize a single auxiliary receiver---single-tap digital cancellers---and operate in multipath propagation environments. Our analysis demonstrates that the degradation due to phase noise is caused by a mismatch between the analog delay of the auxiliary receiver and the different delays of the multipath components of the self-interference signal. We propose a novel multi-tap digital self-interference canceller architecture that is based on multiple auxiliary receivers and a customized Normalized-Least-Mean-Squared (NLMS) filtering for self-interference regeneration. Our simulation results demonstrate that our proposed architecture is more robust to phase noise impairments and can in some cases achieve 10~dB larger self-interference cancellation than the single-tap architecture.


          Numerical Semigroups and Codes. (arXiv:1706.09765v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Maria Bras-Amorós

A numerical semigroup is a subset of N containing 0, closed under addition and with finite complement in N. An important example of numerical semigroup is given by the Weierstrass semigroup at one point of a curve. In the theory of algebraic geometry codes, Weierstrass semigroups are crucial for defining bounds on the minimum distance as well as for defining improvements on the dimension of codes. We present these applications and some theoretical problems related to classification, characterization and counting of numerical semigroups.


          Lifting endo-$p$-permutation modules. (arXiv:1706.09768v1 [math.RT])   

Authors: Caroline Lassueur, Jacques Thévenaz

We prove that all endo-$p$-permutation modules for a finite group are liftable from characteristic $p>0$ to characteristic $0$.


          New Lower Bounds on the Generalized Hamming Weights of AG Codes. (arXiv:1706.09770v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Maria Bras-Amorós, Kwankyu Lee, Albert Vico-Oton

A sharp upper bound for the maximum integer not belonging to an ideal of a numerical semigroup is given and the ideals attaining this bound are characterized. Then the result is used, through the so-called Feng-Rao numbers, to bound the generalized Hamming weights of algebraic-geometry codes. This is further developed for Hermitian codes and the codes on one of the Garcia-Stichtenoth towers, as well as for some more general families.


          Remarks on the canonical metrics on the Cartan-Hartogs domains. (arXiv:1706.09775v1 [math.CV])   

Authors: Enchao Bi, Zhenhan Tu

The Cartan-Hartogs domains are defined as a class of Hartogs type domains over irreducible bounded symmetric domains. For a Cartan-Hartogs domain $\Omega^{B}(\mu)$ endowed with the natural K\"{a}hler metric $g(\mu),$ Zedda conjectured that the coefficient $a_2$ of the Rawnsley's $\varepsilon$-function expansion for the Cartan-Hartogs domain $(\Omega^{B}(\mu), g(\mu))$ is constant on $\Omega^{B}(\mu)$ if and only if $(\Omega^{B}(\mu), g(\mu))$ is biholomorphically isometric to the complex hyperbolic space. In this paper, following Zedda's argument, we give a geometric proof of the Zedda's conjecture by computing the curvature tensors of the Cartan-Hartogs domain $(\Omega^{B}(\mu), g(\mu))$.


          Numerical assessment of two-level domain decomposition preconditioners for incompressible Stokes and elasticity equations. (arXiv:1706.09776v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: Gabriel R. Barrenechea, Michał Bosy, Victorita Dolean

Solving the linear elasticity and Stokes equations by an optimal domain decomposition method derived algebraically involves the use of non standard interface conditions. The one-level domain decomposition preconditioners are based on the solution of local problems. This has the undesired consequence that the results are not scalable, it means that the number of iterations needed to reach convergence increases with the number of subdomains. This is the reason why in this work we introduce, and test numerically, two-level preconditioners. Such preconditioners use a coarse space in their construction. We consider the nearly incompressible elasticity problems and Stokes equations, and discretise them by using two finite element methods, namely, the hybrid discontinuous Galerkin and Taylor-Hood discretisations.


          From effective Hamiltonian to anomaly inflow in topological orders with boundaries. (arXiv:1706.09782v1 [cond-mat.str-el])   

Authors: Yuting Hu, Yidun Wan, Yong-Shi Wu

Whether two boundary conditions of a two-dimensional topological order can be continuously connected without a phase transition in between remains a challenging question. We tackle this challenge by constructing an effective Hamiltonian, describing anyon interaction, that realizes such a continuous deformation. At any point along the deformation, the model remains a fixed point model describing a gapped topological order with gapped boundaries. That the deformation retains the gap is due to the anomaly cancelation between the boundary and bulk. Such anomaly inflow is quantitatively studied using our effective Hamiltonian. We apply our method of effective Hamiltonian to the extended twisted quantum double model with boundaries (constructed by two of us in Ref.[1]). We show that for a given gauge group $G$ and a three-cocycle in $H^3[G,U(1)]$ in the bulk, any two gapped boundaries for a fixed subgroup $K\subseteq G$ on the boundary can be continuously connected via an effective Hamiltonian. Our results can be straightforwardly generalized to the extended Levin-Wen model with boundaries (constructed by two of us in Ref.[2].


          On the parametric representation of univalent functions on the polydisc. (arXiv:1706.09784v1 [math.CV])   

Authors: Sebastian Schleißinger

We consider support points of the class $S^0(\mathbb{D}^n)$ of normalized univalent mappings on the polydisc $\mathbb{D}^n$ with parametric representation and we prove sharp estimates for coefficients of degree 2.


          Stationary solutions for the 2D critical Dirac equation with Kerr nonlinearity. (arXiv:1706.09785v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: William Borrelli (CEREMADE)

In this paper we prove the existence of an exponentially localized stationary solution for a two-dimensional cubic Dirac equation. It appears as an effective equation in the description of nonlinear waves for some Condensed Matter (Bose-Einstein condensates) and Nonlinear Optics (optical fibers) systems. The nonlinearity is of Kerr-type, that is of the form |$\psi$| 2 $\psi$ and thus not Lorenz-invariant. We solve compactness issues related to the critical Sobolev embedding H 1 2 (R 2 , C 2) $\rightarrow$ L 4 (R 2 , C 4) thanks to a particular radial ansatz. Our proof is then based on elementary dynamical systems arguments. Contents


          Convergent Iteration in Sobolev Space for Time Dependent Closed Quantum Systems. (arXiv:1706.09788v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Joseph W. Jerome

Time dependent quantum systems have become indispensable in science and its applications, particularly at the atomic and molecular levels. Here, we discuss the approximation of closed time dependent quantum systems on bounded domains, via iterative methods in Sobolev space based upon evolution operators. Recently, existence and uniqueness of weak solutions were demonstrated by a contractive fixed point mapping defined by the evolution operators. Convergent successive approximation is then guaranteed. This article uses the same mapping to define quadratically convergent Newton and approximate Newton methods. Estimates for the constants used in the convergence estimates are provided. The evolution operators are ideally suited to serve as the framework for this operator approximation theory, since the Hamiltonian is time dependent. In addition, the hypotheses required to guarantee quadratic convergence of the Newton iteration build naturally upon the hypotheses used for the existence/uniqueness theory.


          A sampling theorem for functions in Besov spaces on spaces of homogeneous type. (arXiv:1706.09792v1 [math.CA])   

Authors: Philippe Jaming (IMB), Felipe Negreira (IMB)

In this work we establish a sampling theorem for functions in Besov spaces on spaces of homogeneous type as defined in [HY] in the spirit of their recent counterpart for R d established by Jaming-Malinnikova in [JM]. The main tool is the wavelet decomposition presented by Deng-Han in [DH].


          Real spectrum versus {\ell}-spectrum via brumfiel spectrum. (arXiv:1706.09802v1 [math.RA])   

Authors: Friedrich Wehrung (LMNO)

It is well known that the real spectrum of any commutative unital ring, and the {\ell}-spectrum of any Abelian lattice-ordered group with order-unit, are all completely normal spectral spaces. We prove the following results: (1) Every real spectrum can be embedded, as a spectral subspace, into some {\ell}-spectrum. (2) Not every real spectrum is an {\ell}-spectrum. (3) A spectral subspace of a real spectrum may not be a real spectrum. (4) Not every {\ell}-spectrum can be embedded, as a spectral subspace, into a real spectrum. (5) There exists a completely normal spectral space which cannot be embedded , as a spectral subspace, into any {\ell}-spectrum. The commutative unital rings and Abelian lattice-ordered groups in (2), (3), (4) all have cardinality $\aleph 1 , while the spectral space of (4) has a basis of car-dinality $\aleph 2. Moreover, (3) solves a problem by Mellor and Tressl.


          A new upper bound for the prime counting function $\pi(x)$. (arXiv:1706.09803v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Theophilus Agama, Wilfried Kuissi

In this paper we bring to light an upper bound for the prime counting function $\pi(x)$ using elementary methods, that holds not only for large positive real numbers but for all positive reals. It puts a threshold on the number of primes $p\leq x$ for any given $x$.


          Denominators of Bernoulli polynomials. (arXiv:1706.09804v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Olivier Bordellès, Florian Luca, Pieter Moree, Igor E. Shparlinski

For a positive integer $n$ let $\mathfrak{P}_n=\prod_{s_p(n)\ge p} p,$ where $p$ runs over all primes and $s_p(n)$ is the sum of the base $p$ digits of $n$. For all $n$ we prove that $\mathfrak{P}_n$ is divisible by all "small" primes with at most one exception. We also show that $\mathfrak{P}_n$ is large, has many prime factors exceeding $\sqrt{n}$, with the largest one exceeding $n^{20/37}$. We establish Kellner's conjecture, which says that the number of prime factors exceeding $\sqrt{n}$ grows asymptotically as $\kappa \sqrt{n}/\log n$ for some constant $\kappa$ with $\kappa=2$. Further, we compare the sizes of $\mathfrak{P}_n$ and $\mathfrak{P}_{n+1}$, leading to the somewhat surprising conclusion that although $\mathfrak{P}_n$ tends to infinity with $n$, the inequality $\mathfrak{P}_n>\mathfrak{P}_{n+1}$ is more frequent than its reverse.


          Diagnosability in the case of multi-faults in nonlinear models. (arXiv:1706.09805v1 [math.DS])   

Authors: Sébastien Orange, Nathalie Verdière

This paper presents a novel method for assessing multi-fault diagnosability and detectability of non linear parametrized dynamical models. This method is based on computer algebra algorithms which return precomputed values of algebraic expressions characterizing the presence of some multi-fault(s). Estimations of these expressions, obtained from inputs and outputs measurements, permit then the detection and the isolation of multi-faults possibly acting on the system. This method applied on a coupled water-tank model attests the relevance of the suggested approach.


          Global geometry and $C^1$ convex extensions of $1$-jets. (arXiv:1706.09808v1 [math.DG])   

Authors: Daniel Azagra, Carlos Mudarra

Let $E$ be an arbitrary subset of $\mathbb{R}^n$ (not necessarily bounded), and $f:E\to\mathbb{R}$, $G:E\to\mathbb{R}^n$ be functions. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for the $1$-jet $(f,G)$ to have an extension $(F, \nabla F)$ with $F:\mathbb{R}^n\to\mathbb{R}$ convex and of class $C^{1}$. As an application we also solve a similar problem about finding convex hypersurfaces of class $C^1$ with prescribed normals at the points of an arbitrary subset of $\mathbb{R}^n$.


          On the Bickel-Rosenblatt test of goodness-of-fit for the residuals of autoregressive processes. (arXiv:1706.09811v1 [math.ST])   

Authors: Agnès Lagnoux, Thi Mong Ngoc Nguyen, Frédéric Proïa

We investigate in this paper a Bickel-Rosenblatt test of goodness-of-fit for the density of the noise in an autoregressive model. Since the seminal work of Bickel and Rosenblatt, it is well-known that the integrated squared error of the Parzen-Rosenblatt density estimator, once correctly renormalized, is asymptotically Gaussian for independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) sequences. We show that the result still holds when the statistic is built from the residuals of general stable and explosive autoregressive processes. In the univariate unstable case, we also prove that the result holds when the unit root is located at $-1$ whereas we give further results when the unit root is located at $1$. In particular, we establish that except for some particular asymmetric kernels leading to a non-Gaussian limiting distribution and a slower convergence, the statistic has the same order of magnitude. Finally we build a goodness-of-fit Bickel-Rosenblatt test for the true density of the noise together with its empirical properties on the basis of a simulation study.


          Cooperative Slotted ALOHA for Massive M2M Random Access Using Directional Antennas. (arXiv:1706.09817v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Aleksandar Mastilovic, Dejan Vukobratovic, Dusan Jakovetic, Dragana Bajovic

Slotted ALOHA (SA) algorithms with Successive Interference Cancellation (SIC) decoding have received significant attention lately due to their ability to dramatically increase the throughput of traditional SA. Motivated by increased density of cellular radio access networks due to the introduction of small cells, and dramatic increase of user density in Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications, SA algorithms with SIC operating cooperatively in multi base station (BS) scenario are recently considered. In this paper, we generalize our previous work on Slotted ALOHA with multiple-BS (SA-MBS) by considering users that use directional antennas. In particular, we focus on a simple randomized beamforming strategy where, for every packet transmission, a user orients its main beam in a randomly selected direction. We are interested in the total achievable system throughput for two decoding scenarios: i) non-cooperative scenario in which traditional SA operates at each BS independently, and ii) cooperative SA-MBS in which centralized SIC-based decoding is applied over all received user signals. For both scenarios, we provide upper system throughput limits and compare them against the simulation results. Finally, we discuss the system performance as a function of simple directional antenna model parameters applied in this paper.


          Structural Analysis and Optimal Design of Distributed System Throttlers. (arXiv:1706.09820v1 [cs.SY])   

Authors: Milad Siami, Joëlle Skaf

In this paper, we investigate the performance analysis and synthesis of distributed system throttlers (DST). A throttler is a mechanism that limits the flow rate of incoming metrics, e.g., byte per second, network bandwidth usage, capacity, traffic, etc. This can be used to protect a service's backend/clients from getting overloaded, or to reduce the effects of uncertainties in demand for shared services. We study performance deterioration of DSTs subject to demand uncertainty. We then consider network synthesis problems that aim to improve the performance of noisy DSTs via communication link modifications as well as server update cycle modifications.


          On the complexity of topological conjugacy of compact metrizable $G$-ambits. (arXiv:1706.09821v1 [math.LO])   

Authors: Burak Kaya

In this note, we analyze the classification problem for compact metrizable $G$-ambits for a countable discrete group $G$ from the point of view of descriptive set theory. More precisely, we prove that the topological conjugacy relation on the standard Borel space of compact metrizable $G$-ambits is Borel for every countable discrete group $G$.


          On adelic quotient group for algebraic surface. (arXiv:1706.09826v1 [math.AG])   

Authors: D. V. Osipov

We calculate explicitly an adelic quotient group for an excellent Noetherian normal integral two-dimensional separated scheme. An application to an irreducible normal projective algebraic surface over a field is given.


          Fundamental irreversibility of the classical three-body problem. New approaches and ideas in the study of dynamical systems. (arXiv:1706.09827v1 [math-ph])   

Authors: A. S. Gevorkyan

The three-body general problem is formulated as a problem of geodesic trajectories flows on the Riemannian manifold. It is proved that a curved space with local coordinate system allows to detect new hidden symmetries of the internal motion of a dynamical system and reduce the three-body problem to the system of 6\emph{th} order. It is shown that the equivalence of the initial Newtonian three-body problem and the developed representation provides coordinate transformations in combination with the underdetermined system of algebraic equations. The latter makes a system of geodesic equations relative to the evolution parameter, i.e., to the arc length of the geodesic curve, irreversible. Equations of deviation of geodesic trajectories characterizing the behavior of the dynamical system as a function of the initial parameters of the problem are obtained. To describe the motion of a dynamical system influenced by the external regular and stochastic forces, a system of stochastic equations (SDE) is obtained. Using the system of SDE, a partial differential equation of the second order for the joint probability distribution of the momentum and coordinate of dynamical system in the phase space is obtained. A criterion for estimating the degree of deviation of probabilistic current tubes of geodesic trajectories in the phase and configuration spaces is formulated. The mathematical expectation of the transition probability between two asymptotic subspaces is determined taking into account the multichannel character of the scattering.


          Linear Estimation of Treatment Effects in Demand Response: An Experimental Design Approach. (arXiv:1706.09835v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Pan Li, Baosen Zhang

Demand response aims to stimulate electricity consumers to modify their loads at critical time periods. In this paper, we consider signals in demand response programs as a binary treatment to the customers and estimate the average treatment effect, which is the average change in consumption under the demand response signals. More specifically, we propose to estimate this effect by linear regression models and derive several estimators based on the different models. From both synthetic and real data, we show that including more information about the customers does not always improve estimation accuracy: the interaction between the side information and the demand response signal must be carefully modeled. In addition, we compare the traditional linear regression model with the modified covariate method which models the interaction between treatment effect and covariates. We analyze the variances of these estimators and discuss different cases where each respective estimator works the best. The purpose of these comparisons is not to claim the superiority of the different methods, rather we aim to provide practical guidance on the most suitable estimator to use under different settings. Our results are validated using data collected by Pecan Street and EnergyPlus.


          Cohomologies of nonassociative metagroup algebras. (arXiv:1706.09836v1 [math.AT])   

Authors: Sergey V. Ludkowski

Cohomologies of nonassociative metagroup algebras are investigated. Extensions of metagroup algebras are studied. Examples are given.


          On Rational Points on the Elliptic Curve E(q) : p2 + q2 = r2(1 + p2q2). (arXiv:1706.09842v1 [math.GM])   

Authors: Walter Wyss

We look at the elliptic curve E(q), where q is a fixed rational number. A point (p,r) on E(q) is called a rational point if both p and r are rational numbers. We introduce the concept of conjugate points and show that not both can be rational points.


          Growth of monomial algebras, simple rings and free subalgebras. (arXiv:1706.09845v1 [math.RA])   

Authors: Be'eri Greenfeld

We construct finitely generated simple algebras with prescribed growth types, which can be arbitrarily taken from a large variety of (super-polynomial) growth types. This (partially) answers a question raised by the author in a recent paper.

Our construction goes through a construction of finitely generated just-infinite, primitive monomial algebras with prescribed growth type, from which we construct uniformly recurrent infinite words with subword complexity having the same growth type.

We also discuss the connection between entropy of algebras and their homomorphic images, as well as the degrees of their generators of free subalgebras.


          Pinned distance problem, slicing measures and local smoothing estimates. (arXiv:1706.09851v1 [math.CA])   

Authors: Alex Iosevich, Bochen Liu

We improve the Peres-Schlag result on pinned distances in sets of a given Hausdorff dimension. In particular, for Euclidean distances, with $$\Delta^y(E) = \{|x-y|:x\in E\},$$ we prove that for any $E, F\subset{\Bbb R}^d$, there exists a probability measure $\mu_F$ on $F$ such that for $\mu_F$-a.e. $y\in F$,

(1) $\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(\Delta^y(E))\geq\beta$ if $\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(E) + \frac{d-1}{d+1}\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(F) > d - 1 + \beta$;

(2) $\Delta^y(E)$ has positive Lebesgue measure if $\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(E)+\frac{d-1}{d+1}\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(F) > d$;

(3) $\Delta^y(E)$ has non-empty interior if $\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(E)+\frac{d-1}{d+1}\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(F) > d+1$.

We also show that in the case when $\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(E)+\frac{d-1}{d+1}\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(F)>d$, for $\mu_F$-a.e. $y\in F$, $$ \left\{t\in{\Bbb R} : \dim_{{\mathcal H}}(\{x\in E:|x-y|=t\}) \geq \dim_{{\mathcal H}}(E)+\frac{d+1}{d-1}\dim_{{\mathcal H}}(F)-d \right\} $$ has positive Lebesgue measure. This describes dimensions of slicing subsets of $E$, sliced by spheres centered at $y$.

In our proof, local smoothing estimates of Fourier integral operators (FIO) plays a crucial role. In turn, we obtain results on sharpness of local smoothing estimates by constructing geometric counterexamples.


          Uniform convergence in the individual ergodic theorem for symmetric sequence spaces. (arXiv:1706.09860v1 [math.FA])   

Authors: Vladimir Chilin, Azizhon Azizov

It is proved that for any Dunford-Schwartz operator $T$ acting in the space $l_\infty$ and for each $x\in c_0 $ there exists an element $\widehat x \in c_0 $ such that $\| \frac 1n \sum_{k=0}^{n-1}T^k(x) - \widehat x \|_\infty \to 0$.


          Topologically singular points in the moduli space of Riemann surfaces. (arXiv:1706.09862v1 [math.AG])   

Authors: Antonio F. Costa, Ana M. Porto

In 1962 E. H. Rauch established the existence of points in the moduli space of Riemann surfaces not having a neighbourhood homeomorphic to a ball. These points are called here topologically singular. We give a different proof of the results of Rauch and also determine the topologically singular and non-singular points in the branch locus of some equisymmetric families of Riemann surfaces.


          Superdiffusions with large mass creation --- construction and growth estimates. (arXiv:1706.09864v1 [math.PR])   

Authors: Zhen-Qing Chen, Janos Englander

Superdiffusions corresponding to differential operators of the form $\LL u+\beta u-\alpha u^{2}$ with large mass creation term $\beta$ are studied. Our construction for superdiffusions with large mass creations works for the branching mechanism $\beta u-\alpha u^{1+\gamma},\ 0<\gamma<1,$ as well.

Let $D\subseteq\mathbb{R}^{d}$ be a domain in $\R^d$. When $\beta$ is large, the generalized principal eigenvalue $\lambda_c$ of $L+\beta$ in $D$ is typically infinite. Let $\{T_{t},t\ge0\}$ denote the Schr\"odinger semigroup of $L+\beta$ in $D$ with zero Dirichlet boundary condition. Under the mild assumption that there exists an $0<h\in C^{2}(D)$ so that $T_{t}h$ is finite-valued for all $t\ge 0$, we show that there is a unique $\mathcal{M}_{loc}(D)$-valued Markov process that satisfies a log-Laplace equation in terms of the minimal nonnegative solution to a semilinear initial value problem. Although for super-Brownian motion (SBM) this assumption requires

$\beta$ be less than quadratic, the quadratic case will be treated as well.

When $\lambda_c = \infty$, the usual machinery, including martingale methods and PDE as well as other similar techniques cease to work effectively, both for the construction and for the investigation of the large time behavior of the superdiffusions. In this paper, we develop the following two new techniques in the study of local/global growth of mass and for the spread of the superdiffusions: \begin{itemize} \item a generalization of the Fleischmann-Swart `Poissonization-coupling,' linking superprocesses with branching diffusions; \item the introduction of a new concept: the `{\it $p$-generalized principal eigenvalue.}' \end{itemize} The precise growth rate for the total population of SBM with $\alpha(x)=\beta(x)=1+|x|^p$ for $p\in[0,2]$ is given in this paper.


          Lower Bounds for Betti Numbers of Monomial Ideals. (arXiv:1706.09866v1 [math.AC])   

Authors: Adam Boocher, James Seiner

Let I be a monomial ideal of height c in a polynomial ring S over a field k. If I is not generated by a regular sequence, then we show that the sum of the betti numbers of S/I is at least 2^c + 2^{c-1} and characterize when equality holds. Lower bounds for the individual betti numbers are given as well.


          Construction of multi-bubble solutions for the critical gKdV equation. (arXiv:1706.09870v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Vianney Combet, Yvan Martel

We prove the existence of solutions of the mass critical generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation $\partial_t u + \partial_x(\partial_{xx} u + u^5) = 0$ containing an arbitrary number $K\geq 2$ of blow up bubbles, for any choice of sign and scaling parameters: for any $\ell_1>\ell_2>\cdots>\ell_K>0$ and $\epsilon_1,\ldots,\epsilon_K\in\{\pm1\}$, there exists an $H^1$ solution $u$ of the equation such that \[ u(t) - \sum_{k=1}^K \frac {\epsilon_k}{\lambda_k^\frac12(t)} Q\left( \frac {\cdot - x_k(t)}{\lambda_k(t)} \right) \longrightarrow 0 \quad\mbox{ in }\ H^1 \mbox{ as }\ t\downarrow 0, \] with $\lambda_k(t)\sim \ell_k t$ and $x_k(t)\sim -\ell_k^{-2}t^{-1}$ as $t\downarrow 0$. The construction uses and extends techniques developed mainly by Martel, Merle and Rapha\"el. Due to strong interactions between the bubbles, it also relies decisively on the sharp properties of the minimal mass blow up solution (single bubble case) proved by the authors in arXiv:1602.03519.


          Importance sampling and delayed acceptance via a Peskun type ordering. (arXiv:1706.09873v1 [stat.CO])   

Authors: Jordan Franks, Matti Vihola

We consider importance sampling (IS), pseudomarginal (PM), and delayed acceptance (DA) approaches to reversible Markov chain Monte Carlo, and compare the asymptotic variances. Despite their similarity in terms of using an approximation or unbiased estimators, not much has been said about the relative efficiency of IS and PM/DA. Simple examples demonstrate that the answer is setting specific. We show that the IS asymptotic variance is strictly less than a constant times the PM/DA asymptotic variance, where the constant is twice the essential supremum of the importance weight, and that the inequality becomes an equality as the weight approaches unity in the uniform norm. A version of the inequality also holds for the case of unbounded weight estimators, as long as the estimators are square integrable. The result, together with robustness and computational cost considerations in the context of parallel computing, lends weight to the suggestion of using IS over that of PM/DA when reasonable approximations are available. Our result is based on a Peskun type ordering for importance sampling, which, assuming a familiar Dirichlet form inequality, bounds the asymptotic variance of an IS correction with that of any reversible Markov chain admitting the target distribution as a marginal of its stationary measure. Our results apply to chains using unbiased estimators, which accommodates compound sampling and pseudomarginal settings.


          A universal completion of the ZX-calculus. (arXiv:1706.09877v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Kang Feng Ng, Quanlong Wang

In this paper, we give a universal completion of the ZX-calculus for the whole of pure qubit quantum mechanics. This proof is based on the completeness of another graphical language: the ZW-calculus, with direct translations between these two graphical systems.


          Model reduction of controlled Fokker--Planck and Liouville-von Neumann equations. (arXiv:1706.09882v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: Peter Benner, Tobias Breiten, Carsten Hartmann, Burkhard Schmidt

Model reduction methods for bilinear control systems are compared by means of practical examples of Liouville-von Neumann and Fokker--Planck type. Methods based on balancing generalized system Gramians and on minimizing an H2-type cost functional are considered. The focus is on the numerical implementation and a thorough comparison of the methods. Structure and stability preservation are investigated, and the competitiveness of the approaches is shown for practically relevant, large-scale examples.


          Renyi relative entropies of quantum Gaussian states. (arXiv:1706.09885v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Kaushik P. Seshadreesan, Ludovico Lami, Mark M. Wilde

The quantum Renyi relative entropies play a prominent role in quantum information theory, finding applications in characterizing error exponents and strong converse exponents for quantum hypothesis testing and quantum communication theory. On a different thread, quantum Gaussian states have been intensely investigated theoretically, motivated by the fact that they are more readily accessible in the laboratory than are other, more exotic quantum states. In this paper, we derive formulas for the quantum Renyi relative entropies of quantum Gaussian states. We consider both the traditional (Petz) Renyi relative entropy as well as the more recent sandwiched Renyi relative entropy, finding formulas that are expressed solely in terms of the mean vectors and covariance matrices of the underlying quantum Gaussian states. Our development handles the hitherto elusive case for the Petz--Renyi relative entropy when the Renyi parameter is larger than one. Finally, we also derive a formula for the max-relative entropy of two quantum Gaussian states, and we discuss some applications of the formulas derived here.


          Short-Time Nonlinear Effects in the Exciton-Polariton System. (arXiv:1706.09889v1 [math.AP])   

Authors: Cristi D. Guevara, Stephen P. Shipman

In the exciton-polariton system, a linear dispersive photon field is coupled to a nonlinear exciton field. Short-time analysis of the lossless system shows that, when the photon field is excited, the time required for that field to exhibit nonlinear effects is longer than the time required for the nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation, in which the photon field itself is nonlinear. When the initial condition is scaled by $\epsilon^\alpha$, it is found that the relative error committed by omitting the nonlinear term in the exciton-polariton system remains within $\epsilon$ for all times up to $t=C\epsilon^\beta$, where $\beta=(1-\alpha(p-1))/(p+2)$. This is in contrast to $\beta=1-\alpha(p-1)$ for the nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation.


          On the Cartier Duality of Certain Finite Group Schemes of order $p^n$, II. (arXiv:1210.3980v8 [math.AG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Michio Amano

We explicitly describe the Cartier dual of the $l$-th Frobenius kernel $N_l$ of the deformation group scheme, which deforms the additive group scheme to the multiplicative group scheme. Then the Cartier dual of $N_l$ is given by a certain Frobenius type kernel of the Witt scheme. Here we assume that the base ring $A$ is a $Z_{(p)}/(p^n)$-algebra, where $p$ is a prime number. The obtained result generalizes a previous result by the author which assumes that $A$ is a ring of characteristic $p$.


          On the densest packing of polycylinders in any dimension. (arXiv:1405.0497v2 [math.MG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Wöden Kusner

Using transversality and a dimension reduction argument, a result of A. Bezdek and W. Kuperberg is applied to polycylinders $\mathbb{D}^2\times \mathbb{R}^n$, showing that the optimal packing density is $\pi/\sqrt{12}$ in any dimension.


          Poisson boundaries of monoidal categories. (arXiv:1405.6572v2 [math.OA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Sergey Neshveyev, Makoto Yamashita

Given a rigid C*-tensor category C with simple unit and a probability measure $\mu$ on the set of isomorphism classes of its simple objects, we define the Poisson boundary of $(C,\mu)$. This is a new C*-tensor category P, generally with nonsimple unit, together with a unitary tensor functor $\Pi: C \to P$. Our main result is that if P has simple unit (which is a condition on some classical random walk), then $\Pi$ is a universal unitary tensor functor defining the amenable dimension function on C. Corollaries of this theorem unify various results in the literature on amenability of C*-tensor categories, quantum groups, and subfactors.


          Cyclic Codes over the Matrix Ring $M_2(F_p)$ and Their Isometric Images over $F_{p^2}+uF_{p^2}$. (arXiv:1409.7228v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Dixie F. Falcunit Jr., Virgilio P. Sison

Let $F_p$ be the prime field with $p$ elements. We derive the homogeneous weight on the Frobenius matrix ring $M_2(F_p)$ in terms of the generating character. We also give a generalization of the Lee weight on the finite chain ring $F_{p^2}+uF_{p^2}$ where $u^2=0$. A non-commutative ring, denoted by $\mathcal{F}_{p^2}+\mathbf{v}_p \mathcal{F}_{p^2}$, $\mathbf{v}_p$ an involution in $M_2(F_p)$, that is isomorphic to $M_2(F_p)$ and is a left $F_{p^2}$-vector space, is constructed through a unital embedding $\tau$ from $F_{p^2}$ to $M_2(F_p)$. The elements of $\mathcal{F}_{p^2}$ come from $M_2(F_p)$ such that $\tau(F_{p^2})=\mathcal{F}_{p^2}$. The irreducible polynomial $f(x)=x^2+x+(p-1) \in F_p[x]$ required in $\tau$ restricts our study of cyclic codes over $M_2(F_p)$ endowed with the Bachoc weight to the case $p\equiv$ $2$ or $3$ mod $5$. The images of these codes via a left $F_p$-module isometry are additive cyclic codes over $F_{p^2}+uF_{p^2}$ endowed with the Lee weight. New examples of such codes are given.


          A Polyakov formula for sectors. (arXiv:1411.7894v4 [math.SP] UPDATED)   

Authors: Clara L. Aldana, Julie Rowlett

We consider finite area convex Euclidean circular sectors. We prove a variational Polyakov formula which shows how the zeta-regularized determinant of the Laplacian varies with respect to the opening angle. Varying the angle corresponds to a conformal deformation in the direction of a conformal factor with a logarithmic singularity at the origin. We compute explicitly all the contributions to this formula coming from the different parts of the sector. In the process, we obtain an explicit expression for the heat kernel on an infinite area sector using Carslaw-Sommerfeld's heat kernel. We also compute the zeta-regularized determinant of rectangular domains of unit area and prove that it is uniquely maximized by the square.


          Cohomology of Moduli of Representations of Monomial Algebras. (arXiv:1504.05234v2 [math.AG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Matthew Woolf

In this paper, we study moduli spaces of representations of certain quivers with relations. For quivers without relations and other categories of homological dimension one, a lot of information is known about the cohomology of their moduli spaces of objects. On the other hand, categories of higher homological dimension remain more mysterious from this point of view, with few general methods. In this paper, we will see how some of the methods used to study quivers can be extended to work for representations of any (noncommutative) monomial algebra with relations of length two. In particular, we will give an algorithm to calculate in many cases the classes of these moduli spaces in the Grothendieck ring of varieties.


          Quantum graphs as quantum relations. (arXiv:1506.03892v3 [math.OA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Nik Weaver

The "noncommutative graphs" which arise in quantum error correction are a special case of the quantum relations introduced in [N. Weaver, Quantum relations, Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 215 (2012), v-vi, 81-140]. We use this perspective to interpret the Knill-Laflamme error-correction conditions [E. Knill and R. Laflamme, Theory of quantum error-correcting codes, Phys. Rev. A 55 (1997), 900-911] in terms of graph-theoretic independence, to give intrinsic characterizations of Stahlke's noncommutative graph homomorphisms [D. Stahlke, Quantum source-channel coding and non-commutative graph theory, arXiv:1405.5254] and Duan, Severini, and Winter's noncommutative bipartite graphs [R. Duan, S. Severini, and A. Winter, Zero-error communication via quantum channels, noncommutative graphs, and a quantum Lovasz number, IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory 59 (2013), 1164-1174], and to realize the noncommutative confusability graph associated to a quantum channel as the pullback of a diagonal relation.

Our framework includes as special cases not only purely classical and purely quantum information theory, but also the "mixed" setting which arises in quantum systems obeying superselection rules. Thus we are able to define noncommutative confusability graphs, give error correction conditions, and so on, for such systems. This could have practical value, as superselection constraints on information encoding can be physically realistic.


          Categories of Dimension Zero. (arXiv:1508.04107v2 [math.RT] UPDATED)   

Authors: John D. Wiltshire-Gordon

If D is a category and k is a commutative ring, the functors from D to k-Mod can be thought of as representations of D. By definition, D is dimension zero over k if its finitely generated representations have finite length. We characterize categories of dimension zero in terms of the existence of a "homological modulus" (Definition 1.4) which is combinatorial and linear-algebraic in nature.


          Quadratic Forms and Inversive Geometry. (arXiv:1509.05104v6 [math.AC] UPDATED)   

Authors: Nicholas Phat Nguyen

This paper develops an inversive geometry for anisotropic quadradic spaces, in analogy with the classical inversive geometry of a Euclidean plane. Such a generalization, although relatively straight-forward, does not seem to have been published or generally known, and therefore the account in this paper may be of interest and utility to the mathematical public, particularly since the theory is rather elegant and may have new applications.


          North-South dynamics of hyperbolic free group automorphisms on the space of currents. (arXiv:1509.05443v3 [math.GR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Martin Lustig, Caglar Uyanik

Let $\varphi$ be a hyperbolic outer automorphism of a non-abelian free group $F_N$ such that $\varphi$ and $\varphi^{-1}$ admit absolute train track representatives. We prove that $\varphi$ acts on the space of projectivized geodesic currents on $F_N$ with generalized uniform North-South dynamics.


          On steady non-commutative crepant resolutions. (arXiv:1509.09031v3 [math.RT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Osamu Iyama, Yusuke Nakajima

We introduce special classes of non-commutative crepant resolutions (= NCCR) which we call steady and splitting. We show that a singularity has a steady splitting NCCR if and only if it is a quotient singularity by a finite abelian group. We apply our results to toric singularities and dimer models.


          Low-degree Boolean functions on $S_n$, with an application to isoperimetry. (arXiv:1511.08694v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: David Ellis, Yuval Filmus, Ehud Friedgut

We prove that Boolean functions on $S_n$, whose Fourier transform is highly concentrated on irreducible representations indexed by partitions of $n$ whose largest part has size at least $n-t$, are close to being unions of cosets of stabilizers of $t$-tuples. We also obtain an edge-isoperimetric inequality for the transposition graph on $S_n$ which is asymptotically sharp for subsets of $S_n$ of size $n!/\textrm{poly}(n)$, using eigenvalue techniques. We then combine these two results to obtain a sharp edge-isoperimetric inequality for subsets of $S_n$ of size $(n-t)!$, where $n$ is large compared to $t$, confirming a conjecture of Ben Efraim in these cases.


          Iwasawa theory and $F$-analytic Lubin-Tate $(\varphi,\Gamma)$-modules. (arXiv:1512.03383v2 [math.NT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Laurent Berger, Lionel Fourquaux

Let $K$ be a finite extension of $\mathbf{Q}_p$. We use the theory of $(\varphi,\Gamma)$-modules in the Lubin-Tate setting to construct some corestriction-compatible families of classes in the cohomology of $V$, for certain representations $V$ of $\mathrm{Gal}(\overline{\mathbf{Q}}_p/K)$. If in addition $V$ is crystalline, we describe these classes explicitly using Bloch-Kato's exponential maps. This allows us to generalize Perrin-Riou's period map to the Lubin-Tate setting.


          Slow Reflection. (arXiv:1601.08214v2 [math.LO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Anton Freund

We describe a "slow" version of the hierarchy of uniform reflection principles over Peano Arithmetic ($\mathbf{PA}$). These principles are unprovable in Peano Arithmetic (even when extended by usual reflection principles of lower complexity) and introduce a new provably total function. At the same time the consistency of $\mathbf{PA}$ plus slow reflection is provable in $\mathbf{PA}+\operatorname{Con}(\mathbf{PA})$. We deduce a conjecture of S.-D. Friedman, Rathjen and Weiermann: Transfinite iterations of slow consistency generate a hierarchy of precisely $\varepsilon_0$ stages between $\mathbf{PA}$ and $\mathbf{PA}+\operatorname{Con}(\mathbf{PA})$ (where $\operatorname{Con}(\mathbf{PA})$ refers to the usual consistency statement).


          Moduli spaces of nonspecial pointed curves of arithmetic genus 1. (arXiv:1603.01238v3 [math.AG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Alexander Polishchuk

In this paper we study the moduli stack ${\mathcal U}_{1,n}^{ns}$ of curves of arithmetic genus 1 with n marked points, forming a nonspecial divisor. In arXiv:1511.03797 this stack was realized as the quotient of an explicit scheme $\widetilde{\mathcal U}_{1,n}^{ns}$, affine of finite type over ${\Bbb P}^{n-1}$, by the action of ${\Bbb G}_m^n$ . Our main result is an explicit description of the corresponding GIT semistable loci in $\widetilde{\mathcal U}_{1,n}^{ns}$. This allows us to identify some of the GIT quotients with some of the modular compactifications of ${\mathcal M}_{1,n}$ defined by Smyth in arXiv:0902.3690 and arXiv:0808.0177.


          On Gieseker stability for Higgs sheaves. (arXiv:1603.03100v3 [math.DG] UPDATED)   

Authors: S. A. H. Cardona, O. Mata-Gutiérrez

We review the notion of Gieseker stability for torsion-free Higgs sheaves. This notion is a natural generalization of the classical notion of Gieseker stability for torsion-free coherent sheaves. We prove some basic properties that are similar to the classical ones for torsion-free coherent sheaves over projective algebraic manifolds. In particular, we show that Gieseker stability for torsion-free Higgs sheaves can be defined using only Higgs subsheaves with torsion-free quotients; and we show that a classical relation between Gieseker stability and Mumford-Takemoto stability extends naturally to Higgs sheaves. We also prove that a direct sum of two Higgs sheaves is Gieseker semistable if and only if the Higgs sheaves are both Gieseker semistable with equal normalized Hilbert polynomial and we prove that a classical property of morphisms between Gieseker semistable sheaves also holds in the Higgs case; as a consequence of this and the existing relation between Mumford-Takemoto stability and Gieseker stability, we obtain certain properties concerning the existence of Hermitian-Yang-Mills metrics, simplesness and extensions in the Higgs context. Finally, we make some comments about Jordan-H\"older and Harder-Narasimhan filtrations for Higgs sheaves.


          Estimating the interaction graph of stochastic neural dynamics. (arXiv:1604.00419v4 [math.ST] UPDATED)   

Authors: A. Duarte, A. Galves, E. Löcherbach, G. Ost

In this paper we address the question of statistical model selection for a class of stochastic models of biological neural nets. Models in this class are systems of interacting chains with memory of variable length. Each chain describes the activity of a single neuron, indicating whether it spikes or not at a given time. The spiking probability of a given neuron depends on the time evolution of its presynaptic neurons since its last spike time. When a neuron spikes, its potential is reset to a resting level and postsynaptic current pulses are generated, modifying the membrane potential of all its postsynaptic neurons. The relationship between a neuron and its pre- and postsynaptic neurons defines an oriented graph, the interaction graph of the model. The goal of this paper is to estimate this graph based on the observation of the spike activity of a finite set of neurons over a finite time. We provide explicit exponential upper bounds for the probabilities of under- and overestimating the interaction graph restricted to the observed set and obtain the strong consistency of the estimator. Our result does not require stationarity nor uniqueness of the invariant measure of the process.


          Deformations of the braid arrangement and Trees. (arXiv:1604.06554v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Olivier Bernardi

We establish counting formulas and bijections for deformations of the braid arrangement. Precisely, we consider real hyperplane arrangements such that all the hyperplanes are of the form $x\_i-x\_j=s$ for some integer $s$. Classical examples include the braid, Catalan, Shi, semiorder and Linial arrangements, as well as graphical arrangements. We express the number of regions of any such arrangement as a signed count of decorated plane trees. The characteristic and coboundary polynomials of these arrangements also have simple expressions in terms of these trees. We then focus on certain "well-behaved" deformations of the braid arrangement that we call transitive. This includes the Catalan, Shi, semiorder and Linial arrangements, as well as many other arrangements appearing in the literature. For any transitive deformation of the braid arrangement we establish a simple bijection between regions of the arrangement and a set of plane trees defined by local conditions. This answers a question of Gessel.


          Permutation groups arising from pattern involvement. (arXiv:1605.05571v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Erkko Lehtonen

For an arbitrary finite permutation group $G$, subgroup of the symmetric group $S_\ell$, we determine the permutations involving only members of $G$ as $\ell$-patterns, i.e., avoiding all patterns in the set $S_\ell \setminus G$. The set of all $n$-permutations with this property constitutes again a permutation group. We consequently refine and strengthen the classification of sets of permutations closed under pattern involvement and composition that is due to Atkinson and Beals.


          Approximation and Schauder bases in M\"untz spaces $M_{\Lambda ,C}$ of continuous functions. (arXiv:1605.09661v3 [math.FA] UPDATED)   

Authors: S.V. Ludkowski

In this article M\"untz spaces $M_{\Lambda ,C}$ of continuous functions supplied with the absolute maximum norm are considered. An approximation of functions in M\"untz spaces $M_{\Lambda ,C}$ of continuous functions by Fourier series is studied. An existence of Schauder bases in M\"untz spaces $M_{\Lambda ,C}$ is investigated.


          Family of Subharmonic Functions and Separately Subharmonic Functions. (arXiv:1605.09754v5 [math.CV] UPDATED)   

Authors: Mansour Kalantar

We prove that a separately subharmonic function is subharmonic outside a closed set whose projections are closed nowhere dense with no bounded components. It generalizes a result due to U. Cegerell and A. Sadullaev. Then, given such a set, we construct a separately subharmonic function that is subharmonic everywhere outside that set. We start by proving similar results for the supremum of a family of subharmonic functions that is finite everywhere.


          Almost uniform convergence in noncommutative Dunford-Schwartz ergodic theorem. (arXiv:1606.04501v2 [math.FA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Semyon Litvinov

This article gives an affirmative solution to the problem whether the ergodic Ces\'aro averages generated by a positive Dunford-Schwartz operator in a noncommutative space $L^p(\mathcal M,\tau)$, $1\leq p<\infty$, converge almost uniformly (in Egorov's sense). This problem goes back to the original paper of Yeadon, published in 1977, where bilaterally almost uniform convergence of these averages was established for $p=1$.


          Equiangular Lines and Spherical Codes in Euclidean Space. (arXiv:1606.06620v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Igor Balla, Felix Dräxler, Peter Keevash, Benny Sudakov

A family of lines through the origin in Euclidean space is called equiangular if any pair of lines defines the same angle. The problem of estimating the maximum cardinality of such a family in $\mathbb{R}^n$ was extensively studied for the last 70 years. Motivated by a question of Lemmens and Seidel from 1973, in this paper we prove that for every fixed angle $\theta$ and sufficiently large $n$ there are at most $2n-2$ lines in $\mathbb{R}^n$ with common angle $\theta$. Moreover, this is achievable only for $\theta = \arccos(1/3)$. We also show that for any set of $k$ fixed angles, one can find at most $O(n^k)$ lines in $\mathbb{R}^n$ having these angles. This bound, conjectured by Bukh, substantially improves the estimate of Delsarte, Goethals and Seidel from 1975. Various extensions of these results to the more general setting of spherical codes will be discussed as well.


          Isotropic submanifolds and coadjoint orbits of the Hamiltonian group. (arXiv:1606.07994v2 [math.SG] UPDATED)   

Authors: François Gay-Balmaz, Cornelia Vizman

We describe a class of coadjoint orbits of the group of Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms of a symplectic manifold $(M,\omega)$ by implementing symplectic reduction for the dual pair associated to the Hamiltonian description of ideal fluids. The description is given in terms of nonlinear Grassmannians (manifolds of submanifolds) with additional geometric structures. Reduction at zero momentum yields the identification of coadjoint orbits with Grassmannians of isotropic volume submanifolds, slightly generalizing the results in Weinstein [1990] and Lee [2009]. At the other extreme, the case of a nondegenerate momentum recovers the identification of connected components of the nonlinear symplectic Grassmannian with coadjoint orbits, thereby recovering the result of Haller and Vizman [2004]. We also comment on the intermediate cases which correspond to new classes of coadjoint orbits. The description of these coadjoint orbits as well as their orbit symplectic form is obtained in a systematic way by exploiting the general properties of dual pairs of momentum maps. We also show that whenever the symplectic manifold $(M,\omega)$ is prequantizable, the coadjoint orbits that consist of isotropic submanifolds with total volume $a\in\mathbb{Z}$ are prequantizable. The prequantum bundle is constructed explicitly and, in the Lagrangian case, recovers the Berry bundle constructed in Weinstein [1990].


          A non-vanishing result for the CMC flux. (arXiv:1606.08015v2 [math.DG] UPDATED)   

Authors: William H. Meeks III, Pablo Mira, Joaquín Pérez

We prove the non-vanishing of the CMC flux of the boundaries of certain Riemannian manifolds with constant mean curvature.


          Asymptotic Comparison of ML and MAP Detectors for Multidimensional Constellations. (arXiv:1607.01818v3 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Alex Alvarado, Erik Agrell, Fredrik Brännström

A classical problem in digital communications is to evaluate the symbol error probability (SEP) and bit error probability (BEP) of a multidimensional constellation over an additive white Gaussian noise channel. In this paper, we revisit this problem for nonequally likely symbols and study the asymptotic behavior of the optimal maximum a posteriori (MAP) detector. Exact closed-form asymptotic expressions for SEP and BEP for arbitrary constellations and input distributions are presented. The well-known union bound is proven to be asymptotically tight under general conditions. The performance of the practically relevant maximum likelihood (ML) detector is also analyzed. Although the decision regions with MAP detection converge to the ML regions at high signal-to-noise ratios, the ratio between the MAP and ML detector in terms of both SEP and BEP approach a constant, which depends on the constellation and a priori probabilities. Necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic equivalence between the MAP and ML detectors are also presented.


          On stability of asymptotic property C for products and some group extensions. (arXiv:1607.05181v2 [math.GT] UPDATED)   

Authors: G. Bell, A. Nagórko

We show that Dranishnikov's asymptotic property C is preserved by direct products and the free product of discrete metric spaces. In particular, if $G$ and $H$ are groups with asymptotic property C, then both $G \times H$ and $G * H$ have asymptotic property C. We also prove that a group~$G$ has asymptotic property C if $1\to K\to G\to H\to 1$ is exact, if $\operatorname{asdim} K<\infty$, and if $H$ has asymptotic property C. The groups are assumed to have left-invariant proper metrics and need not be finitely generated. These results settle questions of Dydak and Virk, of Bell and Moran, and an open problem in topology from the Lviv Topological Seminar.


          Vizing's conjecture: a two-thirds bound for claw-free graphs. (arXiv:1607.06936v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Elliot Krop

We show that for any claw-free graph $G$ and any graph $H$, $\gamma(G\square H)\geq \frac{2}{3}\gamma(G)\gamma(H)$, where $\gamma(G)$ is the domination number of $G$.


          Comultiplication for shifted Yangians and quantum open Toda lattice. (arXiv:1608.03331v4 [math.RT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Michael Finkelberg, Joel Kamnitzer, Khoa Pham, Leonid Rybnikov, Alex Weekes

We study a coproduct in type A quantum open Toda lattice in terms of a coproduct in the shifted Yangian of sl_2. At the classical level this corresponds to the multiplication of scattering matrices of euclidean SU(2) monopoles. We also study coproducts for shifted Yangians for any simply-laced Lie algebra.


          The Malliavin derivative and compactness: application to a degenerate PDE-SDE coupling. (arXiv:1609.01495v2 [math.AP] UPDATED)   

Authors: Anna Zhigun

Compactness is one of the most versatile tools in the analysis of nonlinear PDEs and systems. Usually, compactness is established by means of some embedding theorem between functional spaces. Such theorems, in turn, rely on appropriate estimates for a function and its derivatives. While a similar result based on simultaneous estimates for the Malliavin and weak Sobolev derivatives is available for the Wiener-Sobolev spaces, it seems that it has not yet been widely used in the analysis of highly nonlinear parabolic problems with stochasticity. In the present work we apply this result in order to study compactness, existence of global solutions, and, as a by-product, the convergence of a semi-discretisation scheme for a prototypical degenerate PDE-SDE coupling.


          A Method for Computation of Invariants of Geometric Mappings. (arXiv:1609.06579v2 [math.DG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Nenad O. Vesić

General invariants of mappings defined on a non-symmetric affine connection space GAN obtained from curvature tensors of this space are presented in this paper. As an example, it is obtained invariants of an equitorsion geodesic mapping defined on the space GAN.


          Eigenvector Statistics of Sparse Random Matrices. (arXiv:1609.09022v3 [math.PR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Paul Bourgade, Jiaoyang Huang, Horng-Tzer Yau

We prove that the bulk eigenvectors of sparse random matrices, i.e. the adjacency matrices of Erd\H{o}s-R\'enyi graphs or random regular graphs, are asymptotically jointly normal, provided the averaged degree increases with the size of the graphs. Our methodology follows [6] by analyzing the eigenvector flow under Dyson Brownian motion, combining with an isotropic local law for Green's function. As an auxiliary result, we prove that for the eigenvector flow of Dyson Brownian motion with general initial data, the eigenvectors are asymptotically jointly normal in the direction $q$ after time $\eta_*\ll t\ll r$, if in a window of size $r$, the initial density of states is bounded below and above down to the scale $\eta_*$, and the initial eigenvectors are delocalized in the direction $q$ down to the scale $\eta_*$.


          Malcev algebras corresponding to smooth Almost Left Automorphic Moufang Loops. (arXiv:1610.00088v2 [math.RA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Ramiro Carrillo-Catalán, Marina Rasskazova, Liudmila Sabinina

In this note we introduce the concept of an almost left automorphic Moufang loop and study the properties of tangent algebras of smooth loops of this class.


          Quantum groups, Verma modules and $q$-oscillators: General linear case. (arXiv:1610.02901v2 [math-ph] UPDATED)   

Authors: Kh. S. Nirov, A. V. Razumov

The Verma modules over the quantum groups $\mathrm U_q(\mathfrak{gl}_{l + 1})$ for arbitrary values of $l$ are analysed. The explicit expressions for the action of the generators on the elements of the natural basis are obtained. The corresponding representations of the quantum loop algebras $\mathrm U_q(\mathcal L(\mathfrak{sl}_{l + 1}))$ are constructed via Jimbo's homomorphism. This allows us to find certain representations of the positive Borel subalgebras of $\mathrm U_q(\mathcal L(\mathfrak{sl}_{l + 1}))$ as degenerations of the shifted representations. The latter are the representations used in the construction of the so-called $Q$-operators in the theory of quantum integrable systems. The interpretation of the corresponding simple quotient modules in terms of representations of the $q$-deformed oscillator algebra is given.


          The nonequivariant coherent-constructible correspondence for toric stacks. (arXiv:1610.03214v3 [math.SG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Tatsuki Kuwagaki

The nonequivariant coherent-costructible correspondence is a microlocal-geometric interpretation of homological mirror symmetry for toric varieties conjectured by Fang-Liu-Treumann-Zaslow. We prove a generalization of this conjecture for a class of toric stacks which includes any toric varieties and toric orbifolds. Our proof is based on gluing descriptions of $\infty$-categories of both sides.


          Differential Inequalities in Multi-Agent Coordination and Opinion Dynamics Modeling. (arXiv:1610.03373v2 [cs.SY] UPDATED)   

Authors: Anton V. Proskurnikov, Ming Cao

Distributed algorithms of multi-agent coordination have attracted substantial attention from the research community; the simplest and most thoroughly studied of them are consensus protocols in the form of differential or difference equations over general time-varying weighted graphs. These graphs are usually characterized algebraically by their associated Laplacian matrices. Network algorithms with similar algebraic graph theoretic structures, called being of Laplacian-type in this paper, also arise in other related multi-agent control problems, such as aggregation and containment control, target surrounding, distributed optimization and modeling of opinion evolution in social groups. In spite of their similarities, each of such algorithms has often been studied using separate mathematical techniques. In this paper, a novel approach is offered, allowing a unified and elegant way to examine many Laplacian-type algorithms for multi-agent coordination. This approach is based on the analysis of some differential or difference inequalities that have to be satisfied by the some "outputs" of the agents (e.g. the distances to the desired set in aggregation problems). Although such inequalities may have many unbounded solutions, under natural graphic connectivity conditions all their bounded solutions converge (and even reach consensus), entailing the convergence of the corresponding distributed algorithms. In the theory of differential equations the absence of bounded non-convergent solutions is referred to as the equation's dichotomy. In this paper, we establish the dichotomy criteria of Laplacian-type differential and difference inequalities and show that these criteria enable one to extend a number of recent results, concerned with Laplacian-type algorithms for multi-agent coordination and modeling opinion formation in social groups.


          Zooming in on a L\'evy process at its supremum. (arXiv:1610.04471v3 [math.PR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Jevgenijs Ivanovs

Let $M$ and $\tau$ be the supremum and its time of a L\'evy process $X$ on some finite time interval. It is shown that zooming in on $X$ at its supremum, that is, considering $((X_{\tau+t\varepsilon}-M)/a_\varepsilon)_{t\in\mathbb R}$ as $\varepsilon\downarrow 0$, results in $(\xi_t)_{t\in\mathbb R}$ constructed from two independent processes having the laws of some self-similar L\'evy process $\widehat X$ conditioned to stay positive and negative. This holds when $X$ is in the domain of attraction of $\widehat X$ under the zooming-in procedure as opposed to the classical zooming out of Lamperti (1962). As an application of this result we establish a limit theorem for the discretization errors in simulation of supremum and its time, which extends the result of Asmussen, Glynn and Pitman (1995) for the Brownian motion. Additionally, complete characterization of the domains of attraction when zooming in on a L\'evy process at 0 is provided.


          A Complete Hypergeometric Point Count Formula for Dwork Hypersurfaces. (arXiv:1610.09754v2 [math.NT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Heidi Goodson

We extend our previous work on hypergeometric point count formulas by proving that we can express the number of points on families of Dwork hypersurfaces $$X_{\lambda}^d: \hspace{.1in} x_1^d+x_2^d+\ldots+x_d^d=d\lambda x_1x_2\cdots x_d$$ over finite fields of order $q\equiv 1\pmod d$ in terms of Greene's finite field hypergeometric functions. We prove that when $d$ is odd, the number of points can be expressed as a sum of hypergeometric functions plus $(q^{d-1}-1)/(q-1)$ and conjecture that this is also true when $d$ is even. The proof rests on a result that equates certain Gauss sum expressions with finite field hypergeometric functions. Furthermore, we discuss the types of hypergeometric terms that appear in the point count formula and give an explicit formula for Dwork threefolds.


          Towards Information Privacy for the Internet of Things. (arXiv:1611.04254v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Meng Sun, Wee Peng Tay, Xin He

In an Internet of Things network, multiple sensors send information to a fusion center for it to infer a public hypothesis of interest. However, the same sensor information may be used by the fusion center to make inferences of a private nature that the sensors wish to protect. To model this, we adopt a decentralized hypothesis testing framework with binary public and private hypotheses. Each sensor makes a private observation and utilizes a local sensor decision rule or privacy mapping to summarize that observation independently of the other sensors. The local decision made by a sensor is then sent to the fusion center. Without assuming knowledge of the joint distribution of the sensor observations and hypotheses, we adopt a nonparametric learning approach to design local privacy mappings. We introduce the concept of an empirical normalized risk, which provides a theoretical guarantee for the network to achieve information privacy for the private hypothesis with high probability when the number of training samples is large. We develop iterative optimization algorithms to determine an appropriate privacy threshold and the best sensor privacy mappings, and show that they converge. Finally, we extend our approach to the case of a private multiple hypothesis. Numerical results on both synthetic and real data sets suggest that our proposed approach yields low error rates for inferring the public hypothesis, but high error rates for detecting the private hypothesis.


          On the quantized dynamics of factorial languages. (arXiv:1611.06844v3 [math.OA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Christopher Barrett, Evgenios T.A. Kakariadis

We study local piecewise conjugacy of the quantized dynamics arising from factorial languages. We show that it induces a bijection between allowable words of same length and thus it preserves entropy. In the case of sofic factorial languages we prove that local piecewise conjugacy translates to unlabeled graph isomorphism of the follower set graphs. Moreover it induces an unlabeled graph isomorphism between the Fischer covers of irreducible subshifts. We verify that local piecewise conjugacy does not preserve finite type nor irreducibility; but it preserves soficity. Moreover it implies identification (up to a permutation) for factorial languages of type $1$ if, and only if, the follower set function is one-to-one on the symbol set.


          A topological lower bound for the chromatic number of a special family of graphs. (arXiv:1611.06974v3 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Hamid Reza Daneshpajouh

For studying topological obstructions to graph colorings, Hom-complexes were introduced by Lov\'{a}sz. A graph $T$ is called a test graph if for every graph $H$, the $k$-connectedness of $|Hom(T, H)|$ implies $\chi (H)\geq k + 1 + \chi(T)$. The proof of the famous Kneser conjecture is based on the fact that $\mathcal{K}_2$, the complete graph on $2$ vertices, is a test graph. This result was extended to all complete graphs by Babson and Kozlov. Their proof is based on generalized nerve lemma and discrete Morse theory.

In this paper, we propose a new topological lower bound for the chromatic number of a special family of graphs. As an application of this bound, we give a new proof of the well-known fact that complete graphs and even cycles are test graphs.


          The Dixmier property and tracial states for C*-algebras. (arXiv:1611.08263v2 [math.OA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Robert Archbold, Leonel Robert, Aaron Tikuisis

It is shown that a unital C*-algebra A has the Dixmier property if and only if it is weakly central and satisfies certain tracial conditions. This generalises the Haagerup-Zsido theorem for simple C*-algebras. We also study a uniform version of the Dixmier property, as satisfied for example by von Neumann algebras and the reduced C*-algebras of Powers groups, but not by all C*-algebras with the Dixmier property, and we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for a simple unital C*-algebra with unique tracial state to have this uniform property. We give further examples of C*-algebras with the uniform Dixmier property, namely all C*-algebras with the Dixmier property and finite radius of comparison-by-traces. Finally, we determine the distance between two Dixmier sets, in an arbitrary unital C*-algebra, by a formula involving tracial data and algebraic numerical ranges.


          Canonical symplectic structure and structure-preserving geometric algorithms for Schr\"odinger-Maxwell systems. (arXiv:1611.08955v3 [quant-ph] UPDATED)   

Authors: Qiang Chen, Hong Qin, Jian Liu, Jianyuan Xiao, Ruili Zhang, Yang He, Yulei Wang

An infinite dimensional canonical symplectic structure and structure-preserving geometric algorithms are developed for the photon-matter interactions described by the Schr\"odinger-Maxwell equations. The algorithms preserve the symplectic structure of the system and the unitary nature of the wavefunctions, and bound the energy error of the simulation for all time-steps. This new numerical capability enables us to carry out first-principle based simulation study of important photon-matter interactions, such as the high harmonic generation and stabilization of ionization, with long-term accuracy and fidelity.


          $A_\infty$ implies NTA for a class of variable coefficient elliptic operators. (arXiv:1611.09561v3 [math.CA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Steve Hofmann, José María Martell, Tatiana Toro

We consider a certain class of second order, variable coefficient divergence form elliptic operators, in a uniform domain $\Omega$ with Ahlfors regular boundary, and we show that the $A_\infty$ property of the elliptic measure associated to any such operator and its transpose imply that the domain is in fact NTA (and hence chord-arc). The converse was already known, and follows from work of Kenig and Pipher.


          Uniform rectifiability, elliptic measure, square functions, and $\varepsilon$-approximability via an ACF monotonicity formula. (arXiv:1612.02650v3 [math.CA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Jonas Azzam, John Garnett, Mihalis Mourgoglou, Xavier Tolsa

Let $\Omega\subset\mathbb{R}^{n+1}$, $n\geq2$, be an open set with Ahlfors-David regular boundary that satisfies the corkscrew condition. We consider a uniformly elliptic operator $L$ in divergence form associated with a matrix $A$ with real, merely bounded and possibly non-symmetric coefficients, which are also locally Lipschitz and satisfy suitable Carleson type estimates. In this paper we show that if $L^*$ is the operator in divergence form associated with the transpose matrix of $A$, then $\partial\Omega$ is uniformly $n$-rectifiable if and only if every bounded solution of $Lu=0$ and every bounded solution of $L^*v=0$ in $\Omega$ is $\varepsilon$-approximmable if and only if every bounded solution of $Lu=0$ and every bounded solution of $L^*v=0$ in $\Omega$ satisfies a suitable square-function Carleson measure estimate. Moreover, we obtain two additional criteria for uniform rectifiability. One is given in terms of the so-called $S<N$ estimates, and another in terms of a suitable corona decomposition involving $L$-harmonic and $L^*$-harmonic measures. We also prove that if $L$-harmonic measure and $L^*$-harmonic measure satisfy a weak $A_\infty$-type condition, then $\partial \Omega$ is $n$-uniformly rectifiable. In the process we obtain a version of Alt-Caffarelli-Friedman monotonicity formula for a fairly wide class of elliptic operators which is of independent interest and plays a fundamental role in our arguments.


          On the origin of dual Lax pairs and their $r$-matrix structure. (arXiv:1612.04281v4 [math-ph] UPDATED)   

Authors: Jean Avan, Vincent Caudrelier

We establish the algebraic origin of the following observations made previously by the authors and coworkers: (i) A given integrable PDE in $1+1$ dimensions within the Zakharov-Shabat scheme related to a Lax pair can be cast in two distinct, dual Hamiltonian formulations; (ii) Associated to each formulation is a Poisson bracket and a phase space (which are not compatible in the sense of Magri); (iii) Each matrix in the Lax pair satisfies a linear Poisson algebra a la Sklyanin characterized by the {\it same} classical $r$ matrix. We develop the general concept of dual Lax pairs and dual Hamiltonian formulation of an integrable field theory. We elucidate the origin of the common $r$-matrix structure by tracing it back to a single Lie-Poisson bracket on a suitable coadjoint orbit of the loop algebra ${\rm sl}(2,\CC) \otimes \CC (\lambda, \lambda^{-1})$. The results are illustrated with the examples of the nonlinear Schr\"odinger and Gerdjikov-Ivanov hierarchies.


          Distribution of zeros of the S-matrix of chaotic cavities with localized losses and Coherent Perfect Absorption: non-perturbative results. (arXiv:1701.02016v2 [cond-mat.dis-nn] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yan V. Fyodorov, Suwun Suwunarat, Tsampikos Kottos

We employ the Random Matrix Theory framework to calculate the density of zeroes of an $M$-channel scattering matrix describing a chaotic cavity with a single localized absorber embedded in it. Our approach extends beyond the weak-coupling limit of the cavity with the channels and applies for any absorption strength. Importantly it provides an insight for the optimal amount of loss needed to realize a chaotic coherent perfect absorbing (CPA) trap. Our predictions are tested against simulations for two types of traps: a complex network of resonators and quantum graphs.


          Hausdorff dimension of union of affine subspaces. (arXiv:1701.02299v2 [math.MG] UPDATED)   

Authors: K. Héra, T. Keleti, A. Máthé

We prove that for any $1 \le k<n$ and $s\le 1$, the union of any nonempty $s$-Hausdorff dimensional family of $k$-dimensional affine subspaces of ${\mathbb R}^n$ has Hausdorff dimension $k+s$. More generally, we show that for any $0 < \alpha \le k$, if $B \subset {\mathbb R}^n$ and $E$ is a nonempty collection of $k$-dimensional affine subspaces of ${\mathbb R}^n$ such that every $P \in E$ intersects $B$ in a set of Hausdorff dimension at least $\alpha$, then $\dim B \ge 2 \alpha - k + \min(\dim E, 1)$, where $\dim$ denotes the Hausdorff dimension. As a consequence, we generalize the well known Furstenberg-type estimate that every $\alpha$-Furstenberg set has Hausdorff dimension at least $2 \alpha$, we strengthen a theorem of Falconer and Mattila, and we show that for any $0 \le k<n$, if a set $A \subset {\mathbb R}^n$ contains the $k$-skeleton of a rotated unit cube around every point of ${\mathbb R}^n$, or if $A$ contains a $k$-dimensional affine subspace at a fixed positive distance from every point of ${\mathbb R}^n$, then the Hausdorff dimension of $A$ is at least $k + 1$.


          Fast Reconstruction of High-qubit Quantum States via Low Rate Measurements. (arXiv:1701.03695v6 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: K. Li, J. Zhang, S. Cong

Due to the exponential complexity of the resources required by quantum state tomography (QST), people are interested in approaches towards identifying quantum states which require less effort and time. In this paper, we provide a tailored and efficient method for reconstructing mixed quantum states up to $12$ (or even more) qubits from an incomplete set of observables subject to noises. Our method is applicable to any pure or nearly pure state $\rho$, and can be extended to many states of interest in quantum information processing, such as multi-particle entangled $W$ state, GHZ state and cluster states that are matrix product operators of low dimensions. The method applies the quantum density matrix constraints to a quantum compressive sensing optimization problem, and exploits a modified Quantum Alternating Direction Multiplier Method (Quantum-ADMM) to accelerate the convergence. Our algorithm takes $8,35$ and $226$ seconds respectively to reconstruct superposition state density matrices of $10,11,12$ qubits with acceptable fidelity, using less than $1 \%$ of measurements of expectation. To our knowledge it is the fastest realization that people can achieve using a normal desktop. We further discuss applications of this method using experimental data of mixed states obtained in an ion trap experiment of up to $8$ qubits.


          Joint Pushing and Caching for Bandwidth Utilization Maximization in Wireless Networks. (arXiv:1702.01840v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yaping Sun, Ying Cui, Hui Liu

Joint pushing and caching is recognized as an efficient remedy to the problem of spectrum scarcity incurred by tremendous mobile data traffic. In this paper, by exploiting storage resources at end users and predictability of user demand processes, we design the optimal joint pushing and caching policy to maximize bandwidth utilization, which is of fundamental importance to mobile telecom carriers. In particular, we formulate the stochastic optimization problem as an infinite horizon average cost Markov Decision Process (MDP), for which there generally exist only numerical solutions without many insights. By structural analysis, we show how the optimal policy achieves a balance between the current transmission cost and the future average transmission cost. In addition, we show that the optimal average transmission cost decreases with the cache size, revealing a tradeoff between the cache size and the bandwidth utilization. Then, due to the fact that obtaining a numerical optimal solution suffers the curse of dimensionality and implementing it requires a centralized controller and global system information, we develop a decentralized policy with polynomial complexity w.r.t. the numbers of users and files as well as cache size, by a linear approximation of the value function and optimization relaxation techniques. Next, we propose an online decentralized algorithm to implement the proposed low-complexity decentralized policy using the technique of Q-learning, when priori knowledge of user demand processes is not available. Finally, using numerical results, we demonstrate the advantage of the proposed solutions over some existing designs. The results in this paper offer useful guidelines for designing practical cache-enabled content-centric wireless networks.


          Eldan's stochastic localization and tubular neighborhoods of complex-analytic sets. (arXiv:1702.02315v3 [math.MG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Bo'az Klartag

Let Z be the zero set of a holomorphic map from C^n to C^k. Assume that Z is non-empty. We prove that for any r > 0, the Gaussian measure of the Euclidean r-neighborhood of Z is at least as large as the Gaussian measure of the Euclidean r-neighborhood of E, where E is any (n-k)-dimensional, affine, complex subspace whose distance from the origin is the same as the distance of Z from the origin.


          A Random Matrix Approach to Neural Networks. (arXiv:1702.05419v2 [math.PR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Cosme Louart, Zhenyu Liao, Romain Couillet

This article studies the Gram random matrix model $G=\frac1T\Sigma^{\rm T}\Sigma$, $\Sigma=\sigma(WX)$, classically found in the analysis of random feature maps and random neural networks, where $X=[x_1,\ldots,x_T]\in{\mathbb R}^{p\times T}$ is a (data) matrix of bounded norm, $W\in{\mathbb R}^{n\times p}$ is a matrix of independent zero-mean unit variance entries, and $\sigma:{\mathbb R}\to{\mathbb R}$ is a Lipschitz continuous (activation) function --- $\sigma(WX)$ being understood entry-wise. By means of a key concentration of measure lemma arising from non-asymptotic random matrix arguments, we prove that, as $n,p,T$ grow large at the same rate, the resolvent $Q=(G+\gamma I_T)^{-1}$, for $\gamma>0$, has a similar behavior as that met in sample covariance matrix models, involving notably the moment $\Phi=\frac{T}n{\mathbb E}[G]$, which provides in passing a deterministic equivalent for the empirical spectral measure of $G$. Application-wise, this result enables the estimation of the asymptotic performance of single-layer random neural networks. This in turn provides practical insights into the underlying mechanisms into play in random neural networks, entailing several unexpected consequences, as well as a fast practical means to tune the network hyperparameters.


          Incremental computation of block triangular matrix exponentials with application to option pricing. (arXiv:1703.00182v3 [math.NA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Daniel Kressner, Robert Luce, Francesco Statti

We study the problem of computing the matrix exponential of a block triangular matrix in a peculiar way: Block column by block column, from left to right. The need for such an evaluation scheme arises naturally in the context of option pricing in polynomial diffusion models. In this setting a discretization process produces a sequence of nested block triangular matrices, and their exponentials are to be computed at each stage, until a dynamically evaluated criterion allows to stop. Our algorithm is based on scaling and squaring. By carefully reusing certain intermediate quantities from one step to the next, we can efficiently compute such a sequence of matrix exponentials.


          Moufang Theorem for a variety of local non-Moufang loops. (arXiv:1703.01371v2 [math.GR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Ramiro Carrillo-Catalán, Liudmila Sabinina, Marina Rasskazova

An open problem in theory of loops is to find the variety of non- Moufang loops satisfying the Moufang Theorem. In this note, we present a variety of local smooth diassociative loops with such property.


          About the Fricke-Macbeath curve. (arXiv:1703.01869v2 [math.AG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Ruben A. Hidalgo

A Hurwitz curve is a closed Riemann surface of genus $g \geq 2$ whose group of conformal automorphisms has order $84(g-1)$. In 1895, Wiman proved that for $g=3$ there is, up to isomorphisms, a unique Hurwitz curve; this being Klein's plane quartic curve. Moreover, he also proved that there is no Hurwitz curve of genus $g=2,4,5,6$. Later, in 1965, Macbeath proved the existence, up to isomorphisms, of a unique Hurwitz curve of genus $g=7$; this known as the Fricke-Macbeath curve. Equations were also provided; that being the fiber product of suitable three elliptic curves. In the same year, Edge constructed such a genus seven Hurwitz curve by elementary projective geometry. Such a construction was provided by first constructing a $4$-dimensional family of closed Riemann surfaces $S_{\mu}$ admitting a group $G_{\mu} \cong {\mathbb Z}_{2}^{3}$ of conformal automorphisms so that $S_{\mu}/G_{\mu}$ has genus zero. In this paper we discuss the above curves in terms of fiber products of classical Fermat curves and we provide a geometrical explanation of the three elliptic curves in Wiman's description. We also observe that the jacobian variety of the surface $S_{\mu}$ is isogenous to the product of seven elliptic curves (explicitly given) and, for the particular Fricke-Macbeath curve, we obtain the well known fact that its jacobian variety is isogenous to $E^{7}$ for a suitable elliptic curve $E$.


          Properties of screw dislocation dynamics: time estimates on boundary and interior collisions. (arXiv:1703.02474v2 [math.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Thomas Hudson, Marco Morandotti

In this paper, the dynamics of a system of a finite number of screw dislocations is studied. Under the assumption of antiplane linear elasticity, the two-dimensional dynamics is determined by the renormalised energy. The interaction of one dislocation with the boundary and of two dislocations of opposite Burgers moduli are analysed in detail and estimates on the collision times are obtained. Some exactly solvable cases and numerical simulations show agreement with the estimates obtained.


          First-order definability of rational integers in a class of polynomial rings (second version). (arXiv:1703.08266v2 [math.LO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Marco Barone, Nicolás Caro, Eudes Naziazeno

We prove first-order definability of the ground ring of integers inside a polynomial ring with coefficients in a reduced indecomposable (commutative, unital) ring. This extends a result, that has long been known to hold for integral domains, to a wider class of coefficient rings.


          The set of quantum correlations is not closed. (arXiv:1703.08618v2 [quant-ph] UPDATED)   

Authors: William Slofstra

We construct a linear system non-local game which can be played perfectly using a limit of finite-dimensional quantum strategies, but which cannot be played perfectly on any finite-dimensional Hilbert space, or even with any tensor-product strategy. In particular, this shows that the set of (tensor-product) quantum correlations is not closed. The constructed non-local game provides another counterexample to the "middle" Tsirelson problem, with a shorter proof than our previous paper (though at the loss of the universal embedding theorem). We also show that it is undecidable to determine if a linear system game can be played perfectly with a finite-dimensional strategy, or a limit of finite-dimensional quantum strategies.


          Yoneda Structures and KZ Doctrines. (arXiv:1703.08693v2 [math.CT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Charles Walker

In this paper we strengthen the relationship between Yoneda structures and KZ doctrines by showing that for any locally fully faithful KZ doctrine, with the notion of admissibility as defined by Bunge and Funk, all of the Yoneda structure axioms apart from the the right ideal property are automatic.


          Palindromic 3-stage splitting integrators, a roadmap. (arXiv:1703.09958v2 [math.NA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Cédric M. Campos, J. M. Sanz-Serna

The implementation of multi-stage splitting integrators is essentially the same as the implementation of the familiar Strang/Verlet method. Therefore multi-stage formulas may be easily incorporated into software that now uses the Strang/Verlet integrator. We study in detail the two-parameter family of palindromic, three-stage splitting formulas and identify choices of parameters that may outperform the Strang/Verlet method. One of these choices leads to a method of effective order four suitable to integrate in time some partial differential equations. Other choices may be seen as perturbations of the Strang method that increase efficiency in molecular dynamics simulations and in Hybrid Monte Carlo sampling.


          On pointwise periodicity in tilings, cellular automata and subshifts. (arXiv:1703.10013v2 [math.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Tom Meyerovitch, Ville Salo

We study implications of expansiveness and pointwise periodicity for certain groups and semigroups of transformations. Among other things we prove that every pointwise periodic finitely generated group of cellular automata is necessarily finite. We also prove that a subshift over any finitely generated group that consists of finite orbits is finite, and related results for tilings of Euclidean space.


          Embedding arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds. (arXiv:1703.10561v2 [math.GT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Alexander Kolpakov, Alan Reid, Leone Slavich

We prove that any arithmetic hyperbolic $n$-manifold of simplest type can either be geodesically embedded into an arithmetic hyperbolic $(n+1)$-manifold or its universal $\mathrm{mod}~2$ Abelian cover can.


          Local Estimate on Convexity Radius and decay of injectivity radius in a Riemannian manifold. (arXiv:1704.03269v2 [math.DG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Shicheng Xu

In this paper we prove the following pointwise and curvature-free estimates on convexity radius, injectivity radius and local behavior of geodesics in a complete Riemannian manifold $M$: 1) the convexity radius of $p$, $\operatorname{conv}(p)\ge \min\{\frac{1}{2}\operatorname{inj}(p),\operatorname{foc}(B_{\operatorname{inj}(p)}(p))\}$, where $\operatorname{inj}(p)$ is the injectivity radius of $p$ and $\operatorname{foc}(B_r(p))$ is the focal radius of open ball centered at $p$ with radius $r$; 2) for any two points $p,q$ in $M$, $\operatorname{inj}(q)\ge \min\{\operatorname{inj}(p), \operatorname{conj}(q)\}-d(p,q),$ where $\operatorname{conj}(q)$ is the conjugate radius of $q$; 3) for any $0<r<\min\{\operatorname{inj}(p),\frac{1}{2}\operatorname{conj}(B_{\operatorname{inj}(p)}(p))\}$, any (not necessarily minimizing) geodesic in $B_r(p)$ has length $\le 2r$. We also clarify two different concepts on convexity radius and give examples to illustrate that the one more frequently used in literature is not continuous.


          Rules of calculus in the path integral representation of white noise Langevin equations: the Onsager-Machlup approach. (arXiv:1704.03501v2 [cond-mat.stat-mech] UPDATED)   

Authors: Leticia F. Cugliandolo, Vivien Lecomte

The definition and manipulation of Langevin equations with multiplicative white noise require special care (one has to specify the time discretisation and a stochastic chain rule has to be used to perform changes of variables). While discretisation-scheme transformations and non-linear changes of variable can be safely performed on the Langevin equation, these same transformations lead to inconsistencies in its path-integral representation. We identify their origin and we show how to extend the well-known It\=o prescription ($dB^2=dt$) in a way that defines a modified stochastic calculus to be used inside the path-integral representation of the process, in its Onsager-Machlup form.


          NOMA based Calibration for Large-Scale Spaceborne Antenna Arrays. (arXiv:1704.03603v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yujie Lin, Shuai Wang, Xiangyuan Bu, Chengwen Xing, Jianping An

In the parallel calibration for transmitting phased arrays, the calibration receiver must separate the signals belonging to different antenna elements to avoid mutual interference. Existing algorithms encode different antenna elements' radiation with orthogonal signature codes, but these algorithms are far from desired for large-scale spaceborne antenna arrays. Considering the strictly limited resources on satellites, to improve hardware efficiency of large-scale spaceborne antenna arrays, in this work inspired by the idea of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) we design a series of non-orthogonal signature codes for different antenna elements by Cyclically Shifting an m-Sequence (CSmS) with different offsets named as CSmS-NOMA signaling. This design can strike an elegant balance between the performance and complexity and is very suitable for large-scale spaceborne antenna arrays. It is shown that no matter how many antenna elements there are to be calibrated simultaneously, CSmS-NOMA signaling needs only one calibrating waveform generator and one matched filter. Hence it is much more efficient than the existing fully orthogonal schemes. In order to evaluate the achievable calibration accuracy, a unified theoretical framework is developed based on which the relationship between calibration accuracy and signal to noise ratio (SNR) has been clearly revealed. Furthermore, a hardware experiment platform is also built to assess the theoretical work. For all the considered scenarios, it can be concluded that the theoretical, simulated and experimental results coincide with each other perfectly.


          A Component-Based Dual Decomposition Method for the OPF Problem. (arXiv:1704.03647v5 [cs.DC] UPDATED)   

Authors: Sleiman Mhanna, Gregor Verbic, Archie Chapman

This paper proposes a component-based dual decomposition of the nonconvex AC optimal power flow (OPF) problem, where the modified dual function is solved in a distributed fashion. The main contribution of this work is that is demonstrates that a distributed method with carefully tuned parameters can converge to globally optimal solutions despite the inherent nonconvexity of the problem and the absence of theoretical guarantees of convergence. This paper is the first to conduct extensive numerical analysis resulting in the identification and tabulation of the algorithmic parameter settings that are crucial for the convergence of the method on 72 AC OPF test instances. Moreover, this work provides a deeper insight into the geometry of the modified Lagrange dual function of the OPF problem and highlights the conditions that make this function differentiable. This numerical demonstration of convergence coupled with the scalability and the privacy preserving nature of the proposed method brings component-based distributed OPF several steps closer to reality.


          Distributed demand-side contingency-service provisioning while minimizing consumer disutility through local frequency measurements and inter-load communication. (arXiv:1704.04586v3 [math.OC] UPDATED)   

Authors: Jonathan Brooks, Prabir Barooah

We consider the problem of smart and flexible loads providing contingency reserves to the electric grid and provide a Distributed Gradient Projection (DGP) algorithm to minimize loads' disutility while providing contingency services. Each load uses locally obtained grid-frequency measurements and inter-load communication to coordinate their actions, and the privacy of each load is preserved: only gradient information is exchanged---not disutility or consumption information. We provide a proof of convergence of the proposed DGP algorithm, and we compare its performance through simulations to that of a "dual algorithm" previously proposed in the literature that solved the dual optimization problem. The DGP algorithm solves the primal problem. Its main advantage over the dual algorithm is that it is applicable to convex---but not necessarily strictly convex---consumer disutility functions, such as a model of consumer behavior that is insensitive to small changes in consumption, while the dual algorithm is not. Simulations show the DGP algorithm aids in arresting grid-frequency deviations in response to contingency events and performs better or similarly to the dual algorithm in cases where the two can be compared.


          The lost proof of Fermat's last theorem. (arXiv:1704.06335v8 [math.GM] UPDATED)   

Authors: Andrea Ossicini

It is shown that an appropriate use of so-called double equations by Diophantus provides the origin of the Frey elliptic curve and from it we can deduce an elementary proof of Fermat's Last Theorem


          Divergence-free positive symmetric tensors and fluid dynamics. (arXiv:1705.00331v3 [math.AP] UPDATED)   

Authors: Denis Serre (UMPA-ENSL)

We consider $d\times d$ tensors $A(x)$ that are symmetric, positive semi-definite, and whose row-divergence vanishes identically. We establish sharp inequalities for the integral of $(\det A)^{\frac1{d-1}}$. We apply them to models of compressible inviscid fluids: Euler equations, Euler--Fourier, relativistic Euler, Boltzman, BGK, etc... We deduce an {\em a priori} estimate for a new quantity, namely the space-time integral of $\rho^{\frac1n}p$, where $\rho$ is the mass density, $p$ the pressure and $n$ the space dimension. For kinetic models, the corresponding quantity generalizes Bony's functional.


          Accelerated Distributed Nesterov Gradient Descent. (arXiv:1705.07176v2 [math.OC] UPDATED)   

Authors: Guannan Qu, Na Li

This paper considers the distributed optimization problem over a network, where the objective is to optimize a global function formed by a sum of local functions, using only local computation and communication. We develop an Accelerated Distributed Nesterov Gradient Descent (Acc-DNGD) method. When the objective function is convex and $L$-smooth, we show that it achieves a $O(\frac{1}{t^{1.4-\epsilon}})$ convergence rate for all $\epsilon\in(0,1.4)$. We also show the convergence rate can be improved to $O(\frac{1}{t^2})$ if the objective function is a composition of a linear map and a strongly-convex and smooth function. When the objective function is $\mu$-strongly convex and $L$-smooth, we show that it achieves a linear convergence rate of $O([ 1 - C (\frac{\mu}{L})^{5/7} ]^t)$, where $\frac{L}{\mu}$ is the condition number of the objective, and $C>0$ is some constant that does not depend on $\frac{L}{\mu}$.


          Drude Weight for the Lieb-Liniger Bose Gas. (arXiv:1705.08141v2 [cond-mat.stat-mech] UPDATED)   

Authors: Benjamin Doyon, Herbert Spohn

Based on the method of hydrodynamic projections we derive a concise formula for the Drude weight of the repulsive Lieb-Liniger $\delta$-Bose gas. Our formula contains only quantities which are obtainable from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. The Drude weight is an infinite-dimensional matrix, or bilinear functional: it is bilinear in the currents, and each current may refer to a general linear combination of the conserved charges of the model. As a by-product we obtain the dynamical two-point correlation functions involving charge and current densities at small wavelengths and long times, and in addition the scaled covariance matrix of charge transfer. We expect that our formulas extend to other integrable quantum models.


          On the modularity of endomorphism algebras. (arXiv:1705.08225v2 [math.NT] UPDATED)   

Authors: François Brunault

We use the adelic language to show that any homomorphism between Jacobians of modular curves arises from a linear combination of Hecke modular correspondences. The proof is based on a study of the actions of $\mathrm{GL}_2$ and Galois on the \'etale cohomology of the tower of modular curves. We also make this result explicit for Ribet's twisting operators on modular abelian varieties.


          Crossed products of operator algebras: applications of Takai duality. (arXiv:1705.08729v3 [math.OA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Elias Katsoulis, Christopher Ramsey

Let $(\mathcal G, \Sigma)$ be an ordered abelian group with Haar measure $\mu$, let $(\mathcal A, \mathcal G, \alpha)$ be a dynamical system and let $\mathcal A\rtimes_{\alpha} \Sigma $ be the associated semicrossed product. Using Takai duality we establish a stable isomorphism \[ \mathcal A\rtimes_{\alpha} \Sigma \sim_{s} \big(\mathcal A \otimes \mathcal K(\mathcal G, \Sigma, \mu)\big)\rtimes_{\alpha\otimes {\rm Ad}\: \rho} \mathcal G, \] where $\mathcal K(\mathcal G, \Sigma, \mu)$ denotes the compact operators in the CSL algebra ${\rm Alg}\:\mathcal L(\mathcal G, \Sigma, \mu)$ and $\rho$ denotes the right regular representation of $\mathcal G$. We also show that there exists a complete lattice isomorphism between the $\hat{\alpha}$-invariant ideals of $\mathcal A\rtimes_{\alpha} \Sigma$ and the $(\alpha\otimes {\rm Ad}\: \rho)$-invariant ideals of $\mathcal A \otimes \mathcal K(\mathcal G, \Sigma, \mu)$.

Using Takai duality we also continue our study of the Radical for the crossed product of an operator algebra and we solve open problems stemming from the earlier work of the authors. Among others we show that the crossed product of a radical operator algebra by a compact abelian group is a radical operator algebra. We also show that the permanence of semisimplicity fails for crossed products by $\mathbb R$. A final section of the paper is devoted to the study of radically tight dynamical systems, i.e., dynamical systems $(\mathcal A, \mathcal G, \alpha)$ for which the identity ${\rm Rad}(\mathcal A \rtimes_\alpha \mathcal G)=({\rm Rad}\:\mathcal A) \rtimes_\alpha \mathcal G$ persists. A broad class of such dynamical systems is identified.


          Approximating sums by integrals only: multiple sums and sums over lattice polytopes. (arXiv:1705.09159v3 [math.CA] UPDATED)   

Authors: Iosif Pinelis

The Euler--Maclaurin (EM) summation formula is used in many theoretical studies and numerical calculations. It approximates the sum $\sum_{k=0}^{n-1} f(k)$ of values of a function $f$ by a linear combination of a corresponding integral of $f$ and values of its higher-order derivatives $f^{(j)}$. An alternative (Alt) summation formula was recently presented by the author, which approximates the sum by a linear combination of integrals only, without using high-order derivatives of $f$. It was shown that the Alt formula will in most cases outperform, or greatly outperform, the EM formula in terms of the execution time and memory use. In the present paper, a multiple-sum/multi-index-sum extension of the Alt formula is given, with applications to summing possibly divergent multi-index series and to sums over the integral points of integral lattice polytopes.


          Density and current profiles in $U_q(A^{(1)}_2)$ zero range process. (arXiv:1705.10979v2 [math-ph] UPDATED)   

Authors: Atsuo Kuniba, Vladimir V. Mangazeev

The stochastic $R$ matrix for $U_q(A^{(1)}_n)$ introduced recently gives rise to an integrable zero range process of $n$ classes of particles in one dimension. For $n=2$ we investigate how finitely many first class particles fixed as defects influence the grand canonical ensemble of the second class particles. By using the matrix product stationary probabilities involving infinite products of $q$-bosons, exact formulas are derived for the local density and current of the second class particles in the large volume limit.


          The FFRT property of two-dimensional normal graded rings and orbifold curves. (arXiv:1706.00255v3 [math.AG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Nobuo Hara, Ryo Ohkawa

We study the finite $F$-representation type (abbr.\ FFRT) property of a two-dimensional normal graded ring $R$ in characteristic $p>0$, using notions from the theory of algebraic stacks. Given a graded ring $R$, we consider an orbifold curve $\mathfrak C$, which is a root stack over the smooth curve $C=\Proj R$, such that $R$ is the section ring associated to a line bundle $L$ on $\mathfrak C$. The FFRT property of $R$ is then rephrased with respect to the Frobenius push-forwards $F^e_*(L^i)$ on the orbifold curve $\mathfrak C$. As a result, we see that if $R$ is not log terminal, then $R$ has FFRT only in exceptional cases where the characteristics $p$ divides a weight of $\mathfrak C$.


          Multi-point Codes from the GGS Curves. (arXiv:1706.00313v3 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Chuangqiang Hu, Shudi Yang

This paper is concerned with the construction of algebraic geometric codes defined from GGS curves. It is of significant use to describe bases for the Riemann-Roch spaces associated with totally ramified places, which enables us to study multi-point AG codes. Along this line, we characterize explicitly the Weierstrass semigroups and pure gaps. Additionally, we determine the floor of a certain type of divisor and investigate the properties of AG codes from GGS curves. Finally, we apply these results to find multi-point codes with excellent parameters. As one of the examples, a presented code with parameters $ [216,190,\geqslant 18] $ over $ \mathbb{F}_{64} $ yields a new record.


          Vinberg's X_4 Revisited. (arXiv:1706.02232v2 [math.AG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Łukasz Sienkiewicz

The subject of this article is a unique complex K3 surface with maximal Picard rank and with discriminant equal to four. We describe configuration of smooth, rational curves on this surface and identify generators of its automorphisms group with distinguished elements of the Cremona group of $\mathbb{P}^2$. This work may be considered as an extension of Vinberg's research on the subject.


          Conformal metric sequences with integral-bounded scalar curvature. (arXiv:1706.03919v3 [math.DG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yuxiang Li, Zhipeng Zhou

Let $(M; g)$ be a smooth compact Riemiannian manifold without boundary and $g_{k}$ be a metric conformal to $g$. Suppose $vol(M; g_{k})+||R_{k}||_{L^{p}(M;g_{k})} < C$, where $R_{k}$ is the scalar curvature and $p > \frac{n}{2}$. We will use the 3-circle theorem and the John-Nirenberg inequality to study the bubble tree convergence of $g_{k}$.


          A spectral gap for POVMs. (arXiv:1706.04151v2 [math-ph] UPDATED)   

Authors: Victoria Kaminker, Leonid Polterovich, Dor Shmoish

For a class of positive operator valued measures, we introduce the spectral gap, an invariant which shows up in a number of contexts: the quantum noise operator responsible for the unsharpness of quantum measurements, the Markov chain describing the state reduction for repeated quantum measurements, and the Berezin transform on compact Kahler manifolds. The spectral gap admits a transparent description in terms of geometry of certain metric measure spaces, is related to the diffusion distance, and exhibits a robust behaviour under perturbations in the Wasserstein metric.


          Continuity of the Green function in meromorphic families of polynomials. (arXiv:1706.04676v2 [math.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Charles Favre, Thomas Gauthier

We prove that along any marked point the Green function of a meromorphic family of polynomials parameterized by the punctured unit disk explodes exponentially fast near the origin with a continuous error term.


          Alvis-Curtis duality for finite general linear groups and a generalized Mullineux involution. (arXiv:1706.04743v2 [math.RT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Olivier Dudas, Nicolas Jacon

We study the effect of Alvis--Curtis duality on the unipotent representations of $\mathrm{GL}_n(q)$ in non-defining characteristic $\ell$. We show that the permutation induced on the simple modules can be expressed in terms of a generalization of the Mullineux involution on the set of all partitions, which involves both $\ell$ and the order of $q$ modulo $\ell$.


          Nonbacktracking Bounds on the Influence in Independent Cascade Models. (arXiv:1706.05295v2 [cs.SI] UPDATED)   

Authors: Emmanuel Abbe, Sanjeev Kulkarni, Eun Jee Lee

This paper develops upper and lower bounds on the influence measure in a network, more precisely, the expected number of nodes that a seed set can influence in the independent cascade model. In particular, our bounds exploit nonbacktracking walks, Fortuin-Kasteleyn-Ginibre (FKG) type inequalities, and are computed by message passing implementation. Nonbacktracking walks have recently allowed for headways in community detection, and this paper shows that their use can also impact the influence computation. Further, we provide a knob to control the trade-off between the efficiency and the accuracy of the bounds. Finally, the tightness of the bounds is illustrated with simulations on various network models.


          Variable-to-Fixed Length Homophonic Coding Suitable for Asymmetric Channel Coding. (arXiv:1706.06775v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Junya Honda, Hirosuke Yamamoto

In communication through asymmetric channels the capacity-achieving input distribution is not uniform in general. Homophonic coding is a framework to invertibly convert a (usually uniform) message into a sequence with some target distribution, and is a promising candidate to generate codewords with the nonuniform target distribution for asymmetric channels. In particular, a Variable-to-Fixed length (VF) homophonic code can be used as a suitable component for channel codes to avoid decoding error propagation. However, the existing VF homophonic code requires the knowledge of the maximum relative gap of probabilities between two adjacent sequences beforehand, which is an unrealistic assumption for long block codes. In this paper we propose a new VF homophonic code without such a requirement by allowing one-symbol decoding delay. We evaluate this code theoretically and experimentally to verify its asymptotic optimality.


          The (2,4,5) triangle Coxeter group is not systolic. (arXiv:1706.08019v2 [math.GR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Adam Wilks

We show that the (2,4,5) triangle Coxeter group is not systolic.


          On certain weighted 7-colored partitions. (arXiv:1706.08223v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Shane Chern, Dazhao Tang

Inspired by Andrews' 2-colored generalized Frobenius partitions, we consider certain weighted 7-colored partition functions and establish some interesting Ramanujan-type identities and congruences. Moreover, we provide combinatorial interpretations of some congruences modulo 5 and 7. Finally, we study the properties of weighted 7-colored partitions weighted by the parity of certain partition statistics.


          K\"ahler-Ricci solitons on some wonderful group compactifications. (arXiv:1706.08285v2 [math.DG] UPDATED)   

Authors: François Delgove

In this paper, we extend the result about the existence of K\"ahler-Ricci soliton on toric manifold (proved by Wang and Zhy) by proving this existence on some wonderful group compactifications using the continuity method.


          On algorithms to calculate integer complexity. (arXiv:1706.08424v2 [math.NT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Katherine Cordwell, Alyssa Epstein, Anand Hemmady, Steven J. Miller, Eyvindur A. Palsson, Aaditya Sharma, Stefan Steinerberger, Yen Nhi Truong Vu

We consider a problem first proposed by Mahler and Popken in 1953 and later developed by Coppersmith, Erd\H{o}s, Guy, Isbell, Selfridge, and others. Let $f(n)$ be the complexity of $n \in \mathbb{Z^{+}}$, where $f(n)$ is defined as the least number of $1$'s needed to represent $n$ in conjunction with an arbitrary number of $+$'s, $*$'s, and parentheses. Several algorithms have been developed to calculate the complexity of all integers up to $n$. Currently, the fastest known algorithm runs in time $\mathcal{O}(n^{1.230175})$ and was given by J. Arias de Reyna and J. Van de Lune in 2014. This algorithm makes use of a recursive definition given by Guy and iterates through products, $f(d) + f\left(\frac{n}{d}\right)$, for $d \ |\ n$, and sums, $f(a) + f(n - a)$ for $a$ up to some function of $n$. The rate-limiting factor is iterating through the sums. We discuss improvements to this algorithm by reducing the number of summands that must be calculated for almost all $n$. We also develop code to run J. Arias de Reyna and J. van de Lune's analysis in higher bases and thus reduce their runtime of $\mathcal{O}(n^{1.230175})$ to $\mathcal{O}(n^{1.222911236})$.


          On the selection of polynomials for the DLP algorithm. (arXiv:1706.08447v2 [math.NT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Giacomo Micheli

In this paper we characterize the set of polynomials $f\in\mathbb F_q[X]$ satisfying the following property: there exists a positive integer $d$ such that for any positive integer $\ell$ less or equal than the degree of $f$, there exists $t_0$ in $\mathbb F_{q^d}$ such that the polynomial $f-t_0$ has an irreducible factor of degree $\ell$ over $\mathbb F_{q^d}[X]$. This result is then used to progress in the last step which is needed to remove the heuristic from one of the quasi-polynomial time algorithms for discrete logarithm problems (DLP) in small characteristic. Our characterization allows a construction of polynomials satisfying the wanted property.


          A Note on Cyclotomic Integers. (arXiv:1706.05390v1 [math.AC] CROSS LISTED)   

Authors: Nicholas Phat Nguyen

In this note, we present a new proof that the cyclotomic integers constitute the full ring of integers in the cyclotomic field.


          The Hawking-Penrose singularity theorem for $C^{1,1}$-Lorentzian metrics. (arXiv:1706.08426v1 [math-ph] CROSS LISTED)   

Authors: Melanie Graf, James D.E. Grant, Michael Kunzinger, Roland Steinbauer

We show that the Hawking--Penrose singularity theorem, and the generalisation of this theorem due to Galloway and Senovilla, continue to hold for Lorentzian metrics that are of $C^{1, 1}$-regularity. We formulate appropriate weak versions of the strong energy condition and genericity condition for $C^{1,1}$-metrics, and of $C^0$-trapped submanifolds. By regularisation, we show that, under these weak conditions, causal geodesics necessarily become non-maximising. This requires a detailed analysis of the matrix Riccati equation for the approximating metrics, which may be of independent interest.


          From Faddeev-Kulish to LSZ. Towards a non-perturbative description of colliding electrons. (arXiv:1706.09057v1 [hep-th] CROSS LISTED)   

Authors: Wojciech Dybalski

In a low energy approximation of the massless Yukawa theory (Nelson model) we derive a Faddeev-Kulish type formula for the scattering matrix of $N$ electrons and reformulate it in LSZ terms. To this end, we perform a decomposition of the infrared finite Dollard modifier into clouds of real and virtual photons, whose infrared divergencies mutually cancel. We point out that in the original work of Faddeev and Kulish the clouds of real photons are omitted, and consequently their scattering matrix is ill-defined on the Fock space of free electrons. To support our observations, we compare our final LSZ expression for $N=1$ with a rigorous non-perturbative construction due to Pizzo. While our discussion contains some heuristic steps, they can be formulated as clear-cut mathematical conjectures.


          whpearson on Open Thread: November 2009   

There are papers that establish upper bounds on the energy of the higgs boson,

http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/9212305

If the LHC can make particles up to those energy bounds (I don't know and don't have the time to figure it out), and it can be run for sufficient time to make it very unlikely that one wouldn't be created. Then you could establish probable non-existence.


          มัลแวร์ใช้กล้องมือถือแอบถ่ายบ้านคุณ   

อาจทำให้ใครหลายคนต้องอึ้งทึ่งเสียวไปตามๆ กัน เมื่อมหาวิทยาลัยแห่งหนึ่งได้พิสูจน์ให้เห็นว่า มัลแวร์บนสมาร์ทโฟนสามารถพัฒนาให้ฉลาดล้ำ โดยให้มันแอบใช้กล้องบันทึกภาพภายในบ้าน หรือสำนักงานของคุณ เพื่อนำมาสร้างเป็นโมเดลสามมิติ (3D Model) แล้วอัพโหลดกลับมาที่เซิร์ฟเวอร์ของผู้ไม่หวังดี เพื่อเปิดไฟล์ และเลือกดูทุกมุมมองภายในบ้าน หรืออฟฟิศของคุณได้ ฟังดูคล้ายกับที่เห็นในภาพยนตร์วิทยาศาสตร์ แต่นี่มันเป็นเรื่องจริง

ไฟล์เอกสารวิชาการฉบับหนึ่งจั่วหัวไว้ว่า PlaceRaider: Virtual Theft in Physical Spaces with Smartphones ซึ่งเป็นผลงานของนักวิจัยที่ได้แสดงให้เห็นถึงวิธีในการพัฒนาแอพฯ ง่ายๆ ชื่อ PlaceRaider ที่สามารถถ่ายภาพหลายสิบภาพในทุกๆ นาทีบนสมาร์ทโฟน หลังจากนั้น แอพฯ ดังกล่าวจะวิเคราะห์ข้อมูลจากภาพถ่ายที่ได้ และเซ็นเซอร์อื่นๆ ของสมาร์ทโฟน ก่อนที่จะอัพโหลดข้อมูลทั้งหมดส่งกลับไปยังเซิร์ฟเวอร์ที่เชื่อมต่อบนเน็ต โดยภาพถ่ายต่างๆ ตลอดจนข้อมูลเกี่ยวกับตำแหน่ง และทิศทางจากเซ็นเซอร์ Accelerometer และ gyroscope บนสมาร์ทโฟนที่ส่งกลับมายังเซิร์ฟเวอร์จะถูกนำมาใช้ในการสร้างภาพโมเดล 3D ของสภาพแวดล้อมที่เหยื่อ (เจ้าของมือถือที่มีมัลแวร์สายลับตัวนี้) พักอาศัยอยู่ มันจะคล้ายกับว่า มัลแวร์ดังกล่าวทำหน้าที่เหมือนโจรในโลกเสมือนที่แอบย่องเข้าไปในบ้านคุณ เพื่อล้วงความลับบางอย่างที่คุณไม่เคยนำมันออกมาจากในบ้านให้ใครรู้ นอกจากบัญชีธนาคาร พาสเวิร์ด หรือข้อมูลส่วนตัวที่อยู่ในมือถือ ที่สำคัญมันได้ข้อมูลในที่พักของเหยื่อโดยไม่ต้องย่างก้าวเข้าไปในบ้านแม้แต่ก้าวเดียว

 

มัลแวร์ประเภทนี้ไม่ใช่สปายแวร์ แต่ถูกเรียกว่า Sensor Malware ซึ่งกำลังได้รับความนิยมบนแพลตฟอร์ม Android ในช่วงปีที่ผ่านมา โดยเมื่อเร็วๆ นี้นักวิจัยได้สาธิตวิธีการที่มัลแวร์สามารถใช้ไมโครโฟนบนสมาร์ทโฟนแอบฟังการพูดคุยเกี่ยวกับหมายเลขบัตรเครดิต ทั้งนี้ นักวิจัยได้ทดสอบแอพฯ กับนักเรียน 20 คน โดยปล่อยให้มัลแวร์ทำงานบนสมาร์ทโฟนของพวกเขา ผลปรากฎว่า Sensor Malware สามารถเก็บข้อมูล (ภาพ, ตำแหน่ง ฯลฯ) เกี่ยวกับสภาพแวดล้อม และวิเคราะห์ออกมาได้ ซึ่งหากมีการเก็บข้อมูลภาพ และข้อมูลจากเซ็นเซอร์ต่างๆ ได้มากพอ ข้อมูลเหล่านี้จะสามารถนำมาใช้ในการสร้างภาพจำลอง 3D ของสถานที่ที่เหยื่ออยู่ได้เลย สำหรับความสามารถหลักของแอพฯ จะประกอบด้วย 3 ส่วนได้แก่ การเก็บข้อมูลของเซ็นเซอร์ระบุทิศทาง การถ่ายภาพ และการเลือกภาพทีมีคุณสมบัติทั้งที่แตกต่าง และเหลื่อมซ้อนกัน เพื่อนำมาใช้ปะติดปะต่อสร้างเป็นภาพ 3D ประเด็นคือ แม้ตอนดาวน์โหลดแอพฯ จะมีการแจ้ง่ว่า พวกมันจะมีการเข้าถึงกล้อง, การเขียนข้อมูลกับสตอเรจภายนอก และเชื่อมต่อเน็ต แต่ผู้ใช้ทั่วไปก็ไม่ใส่ใจ ส่วนใหญ่จะอนุญาต นั่นหมายความว่า คุณผู้อ่านมีโอกาสที่จะโหลด และติดตั้งแอพฯ อย่าง PlaceRaider เข้าไปในไว้ในสามาร์ทโฟนได้โดยไม่รู้ตัว อย่างไรก็ตาม สิ่งที่ PlaceRaider ทำมากกว่านั้นก็คือ การร้องขอปิดเสียง Shutter เอ่อ...น่ากลัวจริงๆ นะครับ PlaceRaider Camera Malware Spies You, Your Home and Loved Ones

 


          Mapping Early Modern Quiring: Data Mining the Anet Database of Handpress Books. (arXiv:1706.09406v1 [cs.DL])   

Authors: Tom Deneire

This paper documents the methodology used to digitally map early modern quiring patterns through the analysis of a corpus of bibliographic metadata about hand press books from the period 1471-1861. It describes the application of an algorithm that registers the presence of a certain quiring and the ensuing results, mainly relating quiring to chronological (century) and bibliographic factors (format). In conclusion, the interpretation and future analysis of these results for the study of book history is discussed.


          Enabling Prescription-based Health Apps. (arXiv:1706.09407v1 [cs.CY])   

Authors: Venet Osmani, Stefano Forti, Oscar Mayora, Diego Conforti

We describe an innovative framework for prescription of personalised health apps by integrating Personal Health Records (PHR) with disease-specific mobile applications for managing medical conditions and the communication with clinical professionals. The prescribed apps record multiple variables including medical history enriched with innovative features such as integration with medical monitoring devices and wellbeing trackers to provide patients and clinicians with a personalised support on disease management. Our framework is based on an existing PHR ecosystem called TreC, uniquely positioned between healthcare provider and the patients, which is being used by over 70.000 patients in Trentino region in Northern Italy. We also describe three important aspects of health app prescription and how medical information is automatically encoded through the TreC framework and is prescribed as a personalised app, ready to be installed in the patients' smartphone.


          Summarization of ICU Patient Motion from Multimodal Multiview Videos. (arXiv:1706.09430v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Carlos Torres, Kenneth Rose, Jeffrey C. Fried, B. S. Manjunath

Clinical observations indicate that during critical care at the hospitals, patients sleep positioning and motion affect recovery. Unfortunately, there is no formal medical protocol to record, quantify, and analyze patient motion. There is a small number of clinical studies, which use manual analysis of sleep poses and motion recordings to support medical benefits of patient positioning and motion monitoring. Manual processes are not scalable, are prone to human errors, and strain an already taxed healthcare workforce. This study introduces DECU (Deep Eye-CU): an autonomous mulitmodal multiview system, which addresses these issues by autonomously monitoring healthcare environments and enabling the recording and analysis of patient sleep poses and motion. DECU uses three RGB-D cameras to monitor patient motion in a medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The algorithms in DECU estimate pose direction at different temporal resolutions and use keyframes to efficiently represent pose transition dynamics. DECU combines deep features computed from the data with a modified version of Hidden Markov Model to more flexibly model sleep pose duration, analyze pose patterns, and summarize patient motion. Extensive experimental results are presented. The performance of DECU is evaluated in ideal (BC: Bright and Clear/occlusion-free) and natural (DO: Dark and Occluded) scenarios at two motion resolutions in a mock-up and a real ICU. The results indicate that deep features allow DECU to match the classification performance of engineered features in BC scenes and increase the accuracy by up to 8% in DO scenes. In addition, the overall pose history summarization tracing accuracy shows an average detection rate of 85% in BC and of 76% in DO scenes. The proposed keyframe estimation algorithm allows DECU to reach an average 78% transition classification accuracy.


          Data-driven Natural Language Generation: Paving the Road to Success. (arXiv:1706.09433v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Jekaterina Novikova, Ondřej Dušek, Verena Rieser

We argue that there are currently two major bottlenecks to the commercial use of statistical machine learning approaches for natural language generation (NLG): (a) The lack of reliable automatic evaluation metrics for NLG, and (b) The scarcity of high quality in-domain corpora. We address the first problem by thoroughly analysing current evaluation metrics and motivating the need for a new, more reliable metric. The second problem is addressed by presenting a novel framework for developing and evaluating a high quality corpus for NLG training.


          Approximate Quantum Error Correction Revisited: Introducing the Alphabit. (arXiv:1706.09434v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Patrick Hayden, Geoffrey Penington

We establish that, in an appropriate limit, qubits of communication should be regarded as composite resources, decomposing cleanly into independent correlation and transmission components. Because qubits of communication can establish ebits of entanglement, qubits are more powerful resources than ebits. We identify a new communications resource, the zero-bit, which is precisely half the gap between them; replacing classical bits by zero-bits makes teleportation asymptotically reversible. The decomposition of a qubit into an ebit and two zero-bits has wide-ranging consequences including applications to state merging, the quantum channel capacity, entanglement distillation, quantum identification and remote state preparation. The source of these results is the theory of approximate quantum error correction. The action of a quantum channel is reversible if and only if no information is leaked to the environment, a characterization that is useful even in approximate form. However, different notions of approximation lead to qualitatively different forms of quantum error correction in the limit of large dimension. We study the effect of a constraint on the dimension of the reference system when considering information leakage. While the resulting condition fails to ensure that the entire input can be corrected, it does ensure that all subspaces of dimension matching that of the reference are correctable. The size of the reference can be characterized by a parameter $\alpha$; we call the associated resource an $\alpha$-bit. Changing $\alpha$ interpolates between standard quantum error correction and quantum identification, a form of equality testing for quantum states. We develop the theory of $\alpha$-bits, including the applications above, and determine the $\alpha$-bit capacity of general quantum channels, finding single-letter formulas for the entanglement-assisted and amortised variants.


          Unconstrained and Curvature-Constrained Shortest-Path Distances and their Approximation. (arXiv:1706.09441v1 [cs.CG])   

Authors: Ery Arias-Castro, Thibaut Le Gouic

We study shortest paths and their distances on a subset of a Euclidean space, and their approximation by their equivalents in a neighborhood graph defined on a sample from that subset. In particular, we recover and extend the results that Bernstein et al. (2000), developed in the context of manifold learning, and those of Karaman and Frazzoli (2011), developed in the context of robotics. We do the same with curvature-constrained shortest paths and their distances, establishing what we believe are the first approximation bounds for them.


          You Are How You Walk: Uncooperative MoCap Gait Identification for Video Surveillance with Incomplete and Noisy Data. (arXiv:1706.09443v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Michal Balazia, Petr Sojka

This work offers a design of a video surveillance system based on a soft biometric -- gait identification from MoCap data. The main focus is on two substantial issues of the video surveillance scenario: (1) the walkers do not cooperate in providing learning data to establish their identities and (2) the data are often noisy or incomplete. We show that only a few examples of human gait cycles are required to learn a projection of raw MoCap data onto a low-dimensional sub-space where the identities are well separable. Latent features learned by Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC) method discriminate better than any collection of geometric features. The MMC method is also highly robust to noisy data and works properly even with only a fraction of joints tracked. The overall workflow of the design is directly applicable for a day-to-day operation based on the available MoCap technology and algorithms for gait analysis. In the concept we introduce, a walker's identity is represented by a cluster of gait data collected at their incidents within the surveillance system: They are how they walk.


          The application of deep convolutional neural networks to ultrasound for modelling of dynamic states within human skeletal muscle. (arXiv:1706.09450v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Ryan J. Cunningham, Peter J. Harding, Ian D. Loram

This paper concerns the fully automatic direct in vivo measurement of active and passive dynamic skeletal muscle states using ultrasound imaging. Despite the long standing medical need (myopathies, neuropathies, pain, injury, ageing), currently technology (electromyography, dynamometry, shear wave imaging) provides no general, non-invasive method for online estimation of skeletal intramuscular states. Ultrasound provides a technology in which static and dynamic muscle states can be observed non-invasively, yet current computational image understanding approaches are inadequate. We propose a new approach in which deep learning methods are used for understanding the content of ultrasound images of muscle in terms of its measured state. Ultrasound data synchronized with electromyography of the calf muscles, with measures of joint torque/angle were recorded from 19 healthy participants (6 female, ages: 30 +- 7.7). A segmentation algorithm previously developed by our group was applied to extract a region of interest of the medial gastrocnemius. Then a deep convolutional neural network was trained to predict the measured states (joint angle/torque, electromyography) directly from the segmented images. Results revealed for the first time that active and passive muscle states can be measured directly from standard b-mode ultrasound images, accurately predicting for a held out test participant changes in the joint angle, electromyography, and torque with as little error as 0.022{\deg}, 0.0001V, 0.256Nm (root mean square error) respectively.


          Toward Computation and Memory Efficient Neural Network Acoustic Models with Binary Weights and Activations. (arXiv:1706.09453v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Liang Lu

Neural network acoustic models have significantly advanced state of the art speech recognition over the past few years. However, they are usually computationally expensive due to the large number of matrix-vector multiplications and nonlinearity operations. Neural network models also require significant amounts of memory for inference because of the large model size. For these two reasons, it is challenging to deploy neural network based speech recognizers on resource-constrained platforms such as embedded devices. This paper investigates the use of binary weights and activations for computation and memory efficient neural network acoustic models. Compared to real-valued weight matrices, binary weights require much fewer bits for storage, thereby cutting down the memory footprint. Furthermore, with binary weights or activations, the matrix-vector multiplications are turned into addition and subtraction operations, which are computationally much faster and more energy efficient for hardware platforms. In this paper, we study the applications of binary weights and activations for neural network acoustic modeling, reporting encouraging results on the WSJ and AMI corpora.


          Practical Differential Privacy for SQL Queries Using Elastic Sensitivity. (arXiv:1706.09479v1 [cs.CR])   

Authors: Noah Johnson, Joseph P. Near, Dawn Song

Differential privacy promises to enable general data analytics while protecting individual privacy, but existing differential privacy mechanisms do not support the wide variety of features and databases used in real-world SQL-based analytics systems.

This paper presents the first practical approach for differential privacy of SQL queries. Using 8.1 million real-world queries, we conduct an empirical study to determine the requirements for practical differential privacy, and discuss limitations of previous approaches in light of these requirements. To meet these requirements we propose elastic sensitivity, a novel method for approximating the local sensitivity of queries with general equijoins. We prove that elastic sensitivity is an upper bound on local sensitivity and can therefore be used to enforce differential privacy using any local sensitivity-based mechanism.

We build FLEX, a practical end-to-end system to enforce differential privacy for SQL queries using elastic sensitivity. We demonstrate that FLEX is compatible with any existing database, can enforce differential privacy for real-world SQL queries, and incurs negligible (0.03%) performance overhead.


          A Temporal Tree Decomposition for Generating Temporal Graphs. (arXiv:1706.09480v1 [cs.SI])   

Authors: Corey Pennycuff, Salvador Aguinaga, Tim Weninger

Discovering the underlying structures present in large real world graphs is a fundamental scientific problem. Recent work at the intersection of formal language theory and graph theory has found that a Hyperedge Replacement Grammar (HRG) can be extracted from a tree decomposition of any graph. This HRG can be used to generate new graphs that share properties that are similar to the original graph. Because the extracted HRG is directly dependent on the shape and contents of the of tree decomposition, it is unlikely that informative graph-processes are actually being captured with the extraction algorithm. To address this problem, the current work presents a new extraction algorithm called temporal HRG (tHRG) that learns HRG production rules from a temporal tree decomposition of the graph. We observe problems with the assumptions that are made in a temporal HRG model. In experiments on large real world networks, we show and provide reasoning as to why tHRG does not perform as well as HRG and other graph generators.


          User Clustering for Multicast Precoding in Multi-Beam Satellite Systems. (arXiv:1706.09482v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Alessandro Guidotti, Alessandro Vanelli-Coralli, Giorgio Taricco, Guido Montorsi

Current State-of-the-Art High Throughput Satellite systems provide wide-area connectivity through multi-beam architectures. However, due to the tremendous system throughput requirements that next generation Satellite Communications expect to achieve, traditional 4-colour frequency reuse schemes, i.e., two frequency bands with two orthogonal polarisations, are not sufficient anymore and more aggressive solutions as full frequency reuse are gaining momentum. These approaches require advanced interference management techniques to cope with the significantly increased inter-beam interference, like multicast precoding and Multi User Detection. With respect to the former, several peculiar challenges arise when designed for SatCom systems. In particular, to maximise resource usage while minimising delay and latency, multiple users are multiplexed in the same frame, thus imposing to consider multiple channel matrices when computing the precoding weights. In this paper, we focus on this aspect by re-formulating it as a clustering problem. After introducing a novel mathematical framework, we design a k-means-based clustering algorithm to group users into simultaneously precoded and served clusters. Two similarity metrics are used to this aim: the users' Euclidean distance and their channel distance, i.e., distance in the multidimensional channel vector space. Through extensive numerical simulations, we substantiate the proposed algorithms and identify the parameters driving the system performance.


          CASCONet: A Conference dataset. (arXiv:1706.09485v1 [cs.DL])   

Authors: Dixin Luo, Kelly Lyons

Knowledge mobilization and translation describes the process of moving knowledge from research and development (R&D) labs into environments where it can be put to use. There is increasing interest in understanding mechanisms for knowledge mobilization, specifically with respect to academia and industry collaborations. These mechanisms include funding programs, research centers, and conferences, among others. In this paper, we focus on one specific knowledge mobilization mechanism, the CASCON conference, the annual conference of the IBM Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS). The mandate of CAS when it was established in 1990 was to foster collaborative work between the IBM Toronto Lab and university researchers from around the world. The first CAS Conference (CASCON) was held one year after CAS was formed in 1991. The focus of this annual conference was, and continues to be, bringing together academic researchers, industry practitioners, and technology users in a forum for sharing ideas and showcasing the results of the CAS collaborative work. We collected data about CASCON for the past 25 years including information about papers, technology showcase demos, workshops, and keynote presentations. The resulting dataset, called "CASCONet" is available for analysis and integration with related datasets. Using CASCONet, we analyzed interactions between R&D topics and changes in those topics over time. Results of our analysis show how the domain of knowledge being mobilized through CAS had evolved over time. By making CASCONet available to others, we hope that the data can be used in additional ways to understand knowledge mobilization and translation in this unique context.


          Parameterized Algorithms for Partitioning Graphs into Highly Connected Clusters. (arXiv:1706.09487v1 [cs.DS])   

Authors: Ivan Bliznets, Nikolai Karpov

Clustering is a well-known and important problem with numerous applications. The graph-based model is one of the typical cluster models. In the graph model, clusters are generally defined as cliques. However, such an approach might be too restrictive as in some applications, not all objects from the same cluster must be connected. That is why different types of cliques relaxations often considered as clusters.

In our work, we consider a problem of partitioning graph into clusters and a problem of isolating cluster of a special type whereby cluster we mean highly connected subgraph. Initially, such clusterization was proposed by Hartuv and Shamir. And their HCS clustering algorithm was extensively applied in practice. It was used to cluster cDNA fingerprints, to find complexes in protein-protein interaction data, to group protein sequences hierarchically into superfamily and family clusters, to find families of regulatory RNA structures. The HCS algorithm partitions graph in highly connected subgraphs. However, it is achieved by deletion of not necessarily the minimum number of edges. In our work, we try to minimize the number of edge deletions. We consider problems from the parameterized point of view where the main parameter is a number of allowed edge deletions.


          Misinformation spreading on Facebook. (arXiv:1706.09494v1 [cs.SI])   

Authors: Fabiana Zollo, Walter Quattrociocchi

The consumption of a wide and heterogeneous mass of information sources on social media may affect the mechanisms behind the formation of public opinion. Nowadays social media are pervaded by unsubstantiated or untruthful rumors, which contribute to the alarming phenomenon of misinformation. Indeed, such a scenario represents a florid environment for digital wildfires when combined with functional illiteracy, information overload, and confirmation bias. In this essay we focus on a collection of works aiming at providing quantitative evidence about the cognitive determinants behind misinformation and rumor spreading. We account for users' behavior with respect to two distinct narratives: a) conspiracy and b) scientific information sources. In particular, we analyze Facebook data on a time span of five years in both the Italian and the US context, and measure users response to i) information consistent with one's narrative, ii) troll contents, and iii) dissenting information e.g., debunking attempts. Our findings suggest that users join polarized communities sharing a common narrative (echo chamber) and tend to a) to acquire information confirming their beliefs (confirmation bias) even if containing false claims b) ignore dissenting information.


          Real-time Distracted Driver Posture Classification. (arXiv:1706.09498v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Yehya Abouelnaga, Hesham M. Eraqi, Mohamed N. Moustafa

Distracted driving is a worldwide problem leading to an astoundingly increasing number of accidents and deaths. Existing work is concerned with a very small set of distractions (mostly, cell phone usage). Also, for the most part, it uses unreliable ad-hoc methods to detect those distractions. In this paper, we present the first publicly available dataset for "distracted driver" posture estimation with more distraction postures than existing alternatives. In addition, we propose a reliable system that achieves a 95.98% driving posture classification accuracy. The system consists of a genetically-weighted ensemble of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs). We show that a weighted ensemble of classifiers using a genetic algorithm yields in better classification confidence. We also study the effect of different visual elements (i.e. hands and face) in distraction detection by means of face and hand localizations. Finally, we present a thinned version of our ensemble that could achieve a 94.29% classification accuracy and operate in a real-time environment.


          Symmetry-guided design of topologies for supercomputer networks. (arXiv:1706.09506v1 [cs.DM])   

Authors: Alexandre F. Ramos, Yuefan Deng

A family of graphs optimized as the topologies for supercomputer interconnection networks is proposed. The special needs of such network topologies, minimal diameter and mean path length, are met by special constructions of the weight vectors in a representation of the symplectic algebra. Such theoretical design of topologies can conveniently reconstruct the mesh and hypercubic graphs, widely used as today's network topologies. Our symplectic algebraic approach helps generate many classes of graphs suitable for network topologies.


          Fighting biases with dynamic boosting. (arXiv:1706.09516v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Anna Veronika Dorogush, Andrey Gulin, Gleb Gusev, Nikita Kazeev, Liudmila Ostroumova Prokhorenkova, Aleksandr Vorobev

While gradient boosting algorithms are the workhorse of modern industrial machine learning and data science, all current implementations are susceptible to a non-trivial but damaging form of label leakage. It results in a systematic bias in pointwise gradient estimates that lead to reduced accuracy. This paper formally analyzes the issue and presents solutions that produce unbiased pointwise gradient estimates. Experimental results demonstrate that our open-source implementation of gradient boosting that incorporates the proposed algorithm produces state-of-the-art results outperforming popular gradient boosting implementations.


          Neural SLAM. (arXiv:1706.09520v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Jingwei Zhang, Lei Tai, Joschka Boedecker, Wolfram Burgard, Ming Liu

We present an approach for agents to learn representations of a global map from sensor data, to aid their exploration in new environments. To achieve this, we embed procedures mimicking that of traditional Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) into the soft attention based addressing of external memory architectures, in which the external memory acts as an internal representation of the environment. This structure encourages the evolution of SLAM-like behaviors inside a completely differentiable deep neural network. We show that this approach can help reinforcement learning agents to successfully explore new environments where long-term memory is essential. We validate our approach in both challenging grid-world environments and preliminary Gazebo experiments.


          Frame-Semantic Parsing with Softmax-Margin Segmental RNNs and a Syntactic Scaffold. (arXiv:1706.09528v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Swabha Swayamdipta, Sam Thomson, Chris Dyer, Noah A. Smith

We present a new, efficient frame-semantic parser that labels semantic arguments to FrameNet predicates. Built using an extension to the segmental RNN that emphasizes recall, our basic system achieves competitive performance without any calls to a syntactic parser. We then introduce a method that uses phrase-syntactic annotations from the Penn Treebank during training only, through a multitask objective; no parsing is required at training or test time. This "syntactic scaffold" offers a cheaper alternative to traditional syntactic pipelining, and achieves state-of-the-art performance.


          Learning to Learn: Meta-Critic Networks for Sample Efficient Learning. (arXiv:1706.09529v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Flood Sung, Li Zhang, Tao Xiang, Timothy Hospedales, Yongxin Yang

We propose a novel and flexible approach to meta-learning for learning-to-learn from only a few examples. Our framework is motivated by actor-critic reinforcement learning, but can be applied to both reinforcement and supervised learning. The key idea is to learn a meta-critic: an action-value function neural network that learns to criticise any actor trying to solve any specified task. For supervised learning, this corresponds to the novel idea of a trainable task-parametrised loss generator. This meta-critic approach provides a route to knowledge transfer that can flexibly deal with few-shot and semi-supervised conditions for both reinforcement and supervised learning. Promising results are shown on both reinforcement and supervised learning problems.


          Approximation Schemes for Covering and Packing in the Streaming Model. (arXiv:1706.09533v1 [cs.CG])   

Authors: Christopher Liaw, Paul Liu, Robert Reiss

The shifting strategy, introduced by Hochbaum and Maass, and independently by Baker, is a unified framework for devising polynomial approximation schemes to NP-Hard problems. This strategy has been used to great success within the computational geometry community in a plethora of different applications; most notably covering, packing, and clustering problems. In this paper, we revisit the shifting strategy in the context of the streaming model and develop a streaming-friendly shifting strategy. When combined with the shifting coreset method introduced by Fonseca et al., we obtain streaming algorithms for various graph properties of unit disc graphs. As a further application, we present novel approximation algorithms and lower bounds for the unit disc cover (UDC) problem in the streaming model, for which currently no algorithms are known.


          Multi-district preference modelling. (arXiv:1706.09534v1 [cs.GT])   

Authors: Geoffrey Pritchard, Mark C. Wilson

Generating realistic artificial preference distributions is an important part of any simulation analysis of electoral systems. While this has been discussed in some detail in the context of a single electoral district, many electoral systems of interest are based on multiple districts. Neither treating preferences between districts as independent nor ignoring the district structure yields satisfactory results. We present a model based on an extension of the classic Eggenberger-P\'olya urn, in which each district is represented by an urn and there is correlation between urns. We show in detail that this procedure has a small number of tunable parameters, is computationally efficient, and produces "realistic-looking" distributions. We intend to use it in further studies of electoral systems.


          Dynamic Video Streaming in Caching-enabled Wireless Mobile Networks. (arXiv:1706.09536v1 [cs.NI])   

Authors: C. Liang, S. Hu

Recent advances in software-defined mobile networks (SDMNs), in-network caching, and mobile edge computing (MEC) can have great effects on video services in next generation mobile networks. In this paper, we jointly consider SDMNs, in-network caching, and MEC to enhance the video service in next generation mobile networks. With the objective of maximizing the mean measurement of video quality, an optimization problem is formulated. Due to the coupling of video data rate, computing resource, and traffic engineering (bandwidth provisioning and paths selection), the problem becomes intractable in practice. Thus, we utilize dual-decomposition method to decouple those three sets of variables. Extensive simulations are conducted with different system configurations to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.


          Information-Centric Wireless Networks with Mobile Edge Computing. (arXiv:1706.09541v1 [cs.NI])   

Authors: Yuchen Zhou, F. Richard Yu, Jian Chen, Yonghong Kuo

In order to better accommodate the dramatically increasing demand for data caching and computing services, storage and computation capabilities should be endowed to some of the intermediate nodes within the network. In this paper, we design a novel virtualized heterogeneous networks framework aiming at enabling content caching and computing. With the virtualization of the whole system, the communication, computing and caching resources can be shared among all users associated with different virtual service providers. We formulate the virtual resource allocation strategy as a joint optimization problem, where the gains of not only virtualization but also caching and computing are taken into consideration in the proposed architecture. In addition, a distributed algorithm based on alternating direction method of multipliers is adopted to solve the formulated problem, in order to reduce the computational complexity and signaling overhead. Finally, extensive simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme under different system parameters.


          Heterogeneous Services Provisioning in Small Cell Networks with Cache and Mobile Edge Computing. (arXiv:1706.09542v1 [cs.NI])   

Authors: Zhiyuan Tan, F. Richard Yu, Xi Li, Hong Ji, Victor C.M. Leung

In the area of full duplex (FD)-enabled small cell networks, limited works have been done on consideration of cache and mobile edge communication (MEC). In this paper, a virtual FD-enabled small cell network with cache and MEC is investigated for two heterogeneous services, high-data-rate service and computation-sensitive service. In our proposed scheme, content caching and FD communication are closely combined to offer high-data-rate services without the cost of backhaul resource. Computing offloading is conducted to guarantee the delay requirement of users. Then we formulate a virtual resource allocation problem, in which user association, power control, caching and computing offloading policies and resource allocation are jointly considered. Since the original problem is a mixed combinatorial problem, necessary variables relaxation and reformulation are conducted to transfer the original problem to a convex problem. Furthermore, alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm is adopted to obtain the optimal solution. Finally, extensive simulations are conducted with different system configurations to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.


          Flow-free Video Object Segmentation. (arXiv:1706.09544v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Aditya Vora, Shanmuganathan Raman

Segmenting foreground object from a video is a challenging task because of the large deformations of the objects, occlusions, and background clutter. In this paper, we propose a frame-by-frame but computationally efficient approach for video object segmentation by clustering visually similar generic object segments throughout the video. Our algorithm segments various object instances appearing in the video and then perform clustering in order to group visually similar segments into one cluster. Since the object that needs to be segmented appears in most part of the video, we can retrieve the foreground segments from the cluster having maximum number of segments, thus filtering out noisy segments that do not represent any object. We then apply a track and fill approach in order to localize the objects in the frames where the object segmentation framework fails to segment any object. Our algorithm performs comparably to the recent automatic methods for video object segmentation when benchmarked on DAVIS dataset while being computationally much faster.


          Distributional Adversarial Networks. (arXiv:1706.09549v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Chengtao Li, David Alvarez-Melis, Keyulu Xu, Stefanie Jegelka, Suvrit Sra

We propose a framework for adversarial training that relies on a sample rather than a single sample point as the fundamental unit of discrimination. Inspired by discrepancy measures and two-sample tests between probability distributions, we propose two such distributional adversaries that operate and predict on samples, and show how they can be easily implemented on top of existing models. Various experimental results show that generators trained with our distributional adversaries are much more stable and are remarkably less prone to mode collapse than traditional models trained with pointwise prediction discriminators. The application of our framework to domain adaptation also results in considerable improvement over recent state-of-the-art.


          Toward Inverse Control of Physics-Based Sound Synthesis. (arXiv:1706.09551v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: A. Pfalz, E. Berdahl

Long Short-Term Memory networks (LSTMs) can be trained to realize inverse control of physics-based sound synthesizers. Physics-based sound synthesizers simulate the laws of physics to produce output sound according to input gesture signals. When a user's gestures are measured in real time, she or he can use them to control physics-based sound synthesizers, thereby creating simulated virtual instruments. An intriguing question is how to program a computer to learn to play such physics-based models. This work demonstrates that LSTMs can be trained to accomplish this inverse control task with four physics-based sound synthesizers.


          Chord Label Personalization through Deep Learning of Integrated Harmonic Interval-based Representations. (arXiv:1706.09552v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: H.V. Koops, W.B. de Haas, J. Bransen, A. Volk

The increasing accuracy of automatic chord estimation systems, the availability of vast amounts of heterogeneous reference annotations, and insights from annotator subjectivity research make chord label personalization increasingly important. Nevertheless, automatic chord estimation systems are historically exclusively trained and evaluated on a single reference annotation. We introduce a first approach to automatic chord label personalization by modeling subjectivity through deep learning of a harmonic interval-based chord label representation. After integrating these representations from multiple annotators, we can accurately personalize chord labels for individual annotators from a single model and the annotators' chord label vocabulary. Furthermore, we show that chord personalization using multiple reference annotations outperforms using a single reference annotation.


          Transforming Musical Signals through a Genre Classifying Convolutional Neural Network. (arXiv:1706.09553v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: S. Geng, G. Ren, M. Ogihara

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have been successfully applied on both discriminative and generative modeling for music-related tasks. For a particular task, the trained CNN contains information representing the decision making or the abstracting process. One can hope to manipulate existing music based on this 'informed' network and create music with new features corresponding to the knowledge obtained by the network. In this paper, we propose a method to utilize the stored information from a CNN trained on musical genre classification task. The network was composed of three convolutional layers, and was trained to classify five-second song clips into five different genres. After training, randomly selected clips were modified by maximizing the sum of outputs from the network layers. In addition to the potential of such CNNs to produce interesting audio transformation, more information about the network and the original music could be obtained from the analysis of the generated features since these features indicate how the network 'understands' the music.


          The Relationship Between Emotion Models and Artificial Intelligence. (arXiv:1706.09554v1 [cs.HC])   

Authors: Christoph Bartneck, Michael J. Lyons, Martin Saerbeck

Emotions play a central role in most forms of natural human interaction so we may expect that computational methods for the processing and expression of emotions will play a growing role in human-computer interaction. The OCC model has established itself as the standard model for emotion synthesis. A large number of studies employed the OCC model to generate emotions for their embodied characters. Many developers of such characters believe that the OCC model will be all they ever need to equip their character with emotions. This study reflects on the limitations of the OCC model specifically, and on the emotion models in general due to their dependency on artificial intelligence.


          Music Signal Processing Using Vector Product Neural Networks. (arXiv:1706.09555v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Z.C. Fan, T.S. Chan, Y.H. Yang, J.S. R. Jang

We propose a novel neural network model for music signal processing using vector product neurons and dimensionality transformations. Here, the inputs are first mapped from real values into three-dimensional vectors then fed into a three-dimensional vector product neural network where the inputs, outputs, and weights are all three-dimensional values. Next, the final outputs are mapped back to the reals. Two methods for dimensionality transformation are proposed, one via context windows and the other via spectral coloring. Experimental results on the iKala dataset for blind singing voice separation confirm the efficacy of our model.


          Vision-based Detection of Acoustic Timed Events: a Case Study on Clarinet Note Onsets. (arXiv:1706.09556v1 [cs.NE])   

Authors: A. Bazzica, J.C. van Gemert, C.C.S. Liem, A. Hanjalic

Acoustic events often have a visual counterpart. Knowledge of visual information can aid the understanding of complex auditory scenes, even when only a stereo mixdown is available in the audio domain, \eg identifying which musicians are playing in large musical ensembles. In this paper, we consider a vision-based approach to note onset detection. As a case study we focus on challenging, real-world clarinetist videos and carry out preliminary experiments on a 3D convolutional neural network based on multiple streams and purposely avoiding temporal pooling. We release an audiovisual dataset with 4.5 hours of clarinetist videos together with cleaned annotations which include about 36,000 onsets and the coordinates for a number of salient points and regions of interest. By performing several training trials on our dataset, we learned that the problem is challenging. We found that the CNN model is highly sensitive to the optimization algorithm and hyper-parameters, and that treating the problem as binary classification may prevent the joint optimization of precision and recall. To encourage further research, we publicly share our dataset, annotations and all models and detail which issues we came across during our preliminary experiments.


          Machine listening intelligence. (arXiv:1706.09557v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: C.E. Cella

This manifesto paper will introduce machine listening intelligence, an integrated research framework for acoustic and musical signals modelling, based on signal processing, deep learning and computational musicology.


          Talking Drums: Generating drum grooves with neural networks. (arXiv:1706.09558v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: P. Hutchings

Presented is a method of generating a full drum kit part for a provided kick-drum sequence. A sequence to sequence neural network model used in natural language translation was adopted to encode multiple musical styles and an online survey was developed to test different techniques for sampling the output of the softmax function. The strongest results were found using a sampling technique that drew from the three most probable outputs at each subdivision of the drum pattern but the consistency of output was found to be heavily dependent on style.


          Audio Spectrogram Representations for Processing with Convolutional Neural Networks. (arXiv:1706.09559v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: L. Wyse

One of the decisions that arise when designing a neural network for any application is how the data should be represented in order to be presented to, and possibly generated by, a neural network. For audio, the choice is less obvious than it seems to be for visual images, and a variety of representations have been used for different applications including the raw digitized sample stream, hand-crafted features, machine discovered features, MFCCs and variants that include deltas, and a variety of spectral representations. This paper reviews some of these representations and issues that arise, focusing particularly on spectrograms for generating audio using neural networks for style transfer.


          Frame-Based Continuous Lexical Semantics through Exponential Family Tensor Factorization and Semantic Proto-Roles. (arXiv:1706.09562v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Francis Ferraro, Adam Poliak, Ryan Cotterell, Benjamin Van Durme

We study how different frame annotations complement one another when learning continuous lexical semantics. We learn the representations from a tensorized skip-gram model that consistently encodes syntactic-semantic content better, with multiple 10% gains over baselines.


          Online Convolutional Dictionary Learning. (arXiv:1706.09563v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Jialin Liu, Cristina Garcia-Cardona, Brendt Wohlberg, Wotao Yin

While a number of different algorithms have recently been proposed for convolutional dictionary learning, this remains an expensive problem. The single biggest impediment to learning from large training sets is the memory requirements, which grow at least linearly with the size of the training set since all existing methods are batch algorithms. The work reported here addresses this limitation by extending online dictionary learning ideas to the convolutional context.


          Recurrent neural networks with specialized word embeddings for health-domain named-entity recognition. (arXiv:1706.09569v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Inigo Jauregi Unanue, Ehsan Zare Borzeshi, Massimo Piccardi

Background. Previous state-of-the-art systems on Drug Name Recognition (DNR) and Clinical Concept Extraction (CCE) have focused on a combination of text "feature engineering" and conventional machine learning algorithms such as conditional random fields and support vector machines. However, developing good features is inherently heavily time-consuming. Conversely, more modern machine learning approaches such as recurrent neural networks (RNNs) have proved capable of automatically learning effective features from either random assignments or automated word "embeddings". Objectives. (i) To create a highly accurate DNR and CCE system that avoids conventional, time-consuming feature engineering. (ii) To create richer, more specialized word embeddings by using health domain datasets such as MIMIC-III. (iii) To evaluate our systems over three contemporary datasets. Methods. Two deep learning methods, namely the Bidirectional LSTM and the Bidirectional LSTM-CRF, are evaluated. A CRF model is set as the baseline to compare the deep learning systems to a traditional machine learning approach. The same features are used for all the models. Results. We have obtained the best results with the Bidirectional LSTM-CRF model, which has outperformed all previously proposed systems. The specialized embeddings have helped to cover unusual words in DDI-DrugBank and DDI-MedLine, but not in the 2010 i2b2/VA IRB Revision dataset. Conclusion. We present a state-of-the-art system for DNR and CCE. Automated word embeddings has allowed us to avoid costly feature engineering and achieve higher accuracy. Nevertheless, the embeddings need to be retrained over datasets that are adequate for the domain, in order to adequately cover the domain-specific vocabulary.


          Analysis and Modeling of 3D Indoor Scenes. (arXiv:1706.09577v1 [cs.GR])   

Authors: Rui Ma

We live in a 3D world, performing activities and interacting with objects in the indoor environments everyday. Indoor scenes are the most familiar and essential environments in everyone's life. In the virtual world, 3D indoor scenes are also ubiquitous in 3D games and interior design. With the fast development of VR/AR devices and the emerging applications, the demand of realistic 3D indoor scenes keeps growing rapidly. Currently, designing detailed 3D indoor scenes requires proficient 3D designing and modeling skills and is often time-consuming. For novice users, creating realistic and complex 3D indoor scenes is even more difficult and challenging.

Many efforts have been made in different research communities, e.g. computer graphics, vision and robotics, to capture, analyze and generate the 3D indoor data. This report mainly focuses on the recent research progress in graphics on geometry, structure and semantic analysis of 3D indoor data and different modeling techniques for creating plausible and realistic indoor scenes. We first review works on understanding and semantic modeling of scenes from captured 3D data of the real world. Then, we focus on the virtual scenes composed of 3D CAD models and study methods for 3D scene analysis and processing. After that, we survey various modeling paradigms for creating 3D indoor scenes and investigate human-centric scene analysis and modeling, which bridge indoor scene studies of graphics, vision and robotics. At last, we discuss open problems in indoor scene processing that might bring interests to graphics and all related communities.


          R2CNN: Rotational Region CNN for Orientation Robust Scene Text Detection. (arXiv:1706.09579v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Yingying Jiang, Xiangyu Zhu, Xiaobing Wang, Shuli Yang, Wei Li, Hua Wang, Pei Fu, Zhenbo Luo

In this paper, we propose a novel method called Rotational Region CNN (R2CNN) for detecting arbitrary-oriented texts in natural scene images. The framework is based on Faster R-CNN [1] architecture. First, we use the Region Proposal Network (RPN) to generate axis-aligned bounding boxes that enclose the texts with different orientations. Second, for each axis-aligned text box proposed by RPN, we extract its pooled features with different pooled sizes and the concatenated features are used to simultaneously predict the text/non-text score, axis-aligned box and inclined minimum area box. At last, we use an inclined non-maximum suppression to get the detection results. Our approach achieves competitive results on text detection benchmarks: ICDAR 2015 and ICDAR 2013.


          Online Reweighted Least Squares Algorithm for Sparse Recovery and Application to Short-Wave Infrared Imaging. (arXiv:1706.09585v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Subhadip Mukherjee, Deepak R., Huaijin Chen, Ashok Veeraraghavan, Chandra Sekhar Seelamantula

We address the problem of sparse recovery in an online setting, where random linear measurements of a sparse signal are revealed sequentially and the objective is to recover the underlying signal. We propose a reweighted least squares (RLS) algorithm to solve the problem of online sparse reconstruction, wherein a system of linear equations is solved using conjugate gradient with the arrival of every new measurement. The proposed online algorithm is useful in a setting where one seeks to design a progressive decoding strategy to reconstruct a sparse signal from linear measurements so that one does not have to wait until all measurements are acquired. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is also useful in applications where it is infeasible to process all the measurements using a batch algorithm, owing to computational and storage constraints. It is not needed a priori to collect a fixed number of measurements; rather one can keep collecting measurements until the quality of reconstruction is satisfactory and stop taking further measurements once the reconstruction is sufficiently accurate. We provide a proof-of-concept by comparing the performance of our algorithm with the RLS-based batch reconstruction strategy, known as iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS), on natural images. Experiments on a recently proposed focal plane array-based imaging setup show up to 1 dB improvement in output peak signal-to-noise ratio as compared with the total variation-based reconstruction.


          Multi-scale Multi-band DenseNets for Audio Source Separation. (arXiv:1706.09588v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Naoya Takahashi, Yuki Mitsufuji

This paper deals with the problem of audio source separation. To handle the complex and ill-posed nature of the problems of audio source separation, the current state-of-the-art approaches employ deep neural networks to obtain instrumental spectra from a mixture. In this study, we propose a novel network architecture that extends the recently developed densely connected convolutional network (DenseNet), which has shown excellent results on image classification tasks. To deal with the specific problem of audio source separation, an up-sampling layer, block skip connection and band-dedicated dense blocks are incorporated on top of DenseNet. The proposed approach takes advantage of long contextual information and outperforms state-of-the-art results on SiSEC 2016 competition by a large margin in terms of signal-to-distortion ratio. Moreover, the proposed architecture requires significantly fewer parameters and considerably less training time compared with other methods.


          Defining Equitable Geographic Districts in Road Networks via Stable Matching. (arXiv:1706.09593v1 [cs.DS])   

Authors: David Eppstein, Michael Goodrich, Doruk Korkmaz, Nil Mamano

We introduce a novel method for defining geographic districts in road networks using stable matching. In this approach, each geographic district is defined in terms of a center, which identifies a location of interest, such as a post office or polling place, and all other network vertices must be labeled with the center to which they are associated. We focus on defining geographic districts that are equitable, in that every district has the same number of vertices and the assignment is stable in terms of geographic distance. That is, there is no unassigned vertex-center pair such that both would prefer each other over their current assignments. We solve this problem using a version of the classic stable matching problem, called symmetric stable matching, in which the preferences of the elements in both sets obey a certain symmetry. In our case, we study a graph-based version of stable matching in which nodes are stably matched to a subset of nodes denoted as centers, prioritized by their shortest-path distances, so that each center is apportioned a certain number of nodes. We show that, for a planar graph or road network with $n$ nodes and $k$ centers, the problem can be solved in $O(n\sqrt{n}\log n)$ time, which improves upon the $O(nk)$ runtime of using the classic Gale-Shapley stable matching algorithm when $k$ is large. In order to achieve this running time, we present a novel dynamic nearest-neighbor data structure for road networks, which may be of independent interest. This data structure maintains a subset of nodes of the network and allows nearest-neighbor queries (for other nodes in the graph) in $O(\sqrt{n})$ time and updates in $O(\sqrt{n}\log n)$ time. Finally, we provide experimental results on road networks for these algorithms and a heuristic algorithm that performs better than the Gale-Shapley algorithm for any range of values of $k$.


          Path Integral Networks: End-to-End Differentiable Optimal Control. (arXiv:1706.09597v1 [cs.AI])   

Authors: Masashi Okada, Luca Rigazio, Takenobu Aoshima

In this paper, we introduce Path Integral Networks (PI-Net), a recurrent network representation of the Path Integral optimal control algorithm. The network includes both system dynamics and cost models, used for optimal control based planning. PI-Net is fully differentiable, learning both dynamics and cost models end-to-end by back-propagation and stochastic gradient descent. Because of this, PI-Net can learn to plan. PI-Net has several advantages: it can generalize to unseen states thanks to planning, it can be applied to continuous control tasks, and it allows for a wide variety learning schemes, including imitation and reinforcement learning. Preliminary experiment results show that PI-Net, trained by imitation learning, can mimic control demonstrations for two simulated problems; a linear system and a pendulum swing-up problem. We also show that PI-Net is able to learn dynamics and cost models latent in the demonstrations.


          CS591 Report: Application of siamesa network in 2D transformation. (arXiv:1706.09598v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Dorothy Chang

Deep learning has been extensively used various aspects of computer vision area. Deep learning separate itself from traditional neural network by having a much deeper and complicated network layers in its network structures. Traditionally, deep neural network is abundantly used in computer vision tasks including classification and detection and has achieve remarkable success and set up a new state of the art results in these fields. Instead of using neural network for vision recognition and detection. I will show the ability of neural network to do image registration, synthesis of images and image retrieval in this report.


          Actor-Critic Sequence Training for Image Captioning. (arXiv:1706.09601v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Li Zhang, Flood Sung, Feng Liu, Tao Xiang, Shaogang Gong, Yongxin Yang, Timothy M. Hospedales

Generating natural language descriptions of images is an important capability for a robot or other visual-intelligence driven AI agent that may need to communicate with human users about what it is seeing. Such image captioning methods are typically trained by maximising the likelihood of ground-truth annotated caption given the image. While simple and easy to implement, this approach does not directly maximise the language quality metrics we care about such as CIDEr. In this paper we investigate training image captioning methods based on actor-critic reinforcement learning in order to directly optimise non-differentiable quality metrics of interest. By formulating a per-token advantage and value computation strategy in this novel reinforcement learning based captioning model, we show that it is possible to achieve the state of the art performance on the widely used MSCOCO benchmark.


          Theoretical Performance Analysis of Vehicular Broadcast Communications at Intersection and their Optimization. (arXiv:1706.09606v1 [cs.PF])   

Authors: Tatsuaki Kimura, Hiroshi Saito

In this paper, we theoretically analyze the performance of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) broadcast communications at an intersection and provide tractable formulae of performance metrics to optimize them.


          A sharp recovery condition for sparse signals with partial support information via orthogonal matching pursuit. (arXiv:1706.09607v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Huanmin Ge, Wengu Chen

This paper considers the exact recovery of $k$-sparse signals in the noiseless setting and support recovery in the noisy case when some prior information on the support of the signals is available. This prior support consists of two parts. One part is a subset of the true support and another part is outside of the true support. For $k$-sparse signals $\mathbf{x}$ with the prior support which is composed of $g$ true indices and $b$ wrong indices, we show that if the restricted isometry constant (RIC) $\delta_{k+b+1}$ of the sensing matrix $\mathbf{A}$ satisfies \begin{eqnarray*} \delta_{k+b+1}<\frac{1}{\sqrt{k-g+1}}, \end{eqnarray*} then orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm can perfectly recover the signals $\mathbf{x}$ from $\mathbf{y}=\mathbf{Ax}$ in $k-g$ iterations. Moreover, we show the above sufficient condition on the RIC is sharp. In the noisy case, we achieve the exact recovery of the remainder support (the part of the true support outside of the prior support) for the $k$-sparse signals $\mathbf{x}$ from $\mathbf{y}=\mathbf{Ax}+\mathbf{v}$ under appropriate conditions. For the remainder support recovery, we also obtain a necessary condition based on the minimum magnitude of partial nonzero elements of the signals $\mathbf{x}$.


          Token Jumping in minor-closed classes. (arXiv:1706.09608v1 [cs.CC])   

Authors: Nicolas Bousquet, Arnaud Mary, Aline Parreau

Given two $k$-independent sets $I$ and $J$ of a graph $G$, one can ask if it is possible to transform the one into the other in such a way that, at any step, we replace one vertex of the current independent set by another while keeping the property of being independent. Deciding this problem, known as the Token Jumping (TJ) reconfiguration problem, is PSPACE-complete even on planar graphs. Ito et al. proved in 2014 that the problem is FPT parameterized by $k$ if the input graph is $K_{3,\ell}$-free.

We prove that the result of Ito et al. can be extended to any $K_{\ell,\ell}$-free graphs. In other words, if $G$ is a $K_{\ell,\ell}$-free graph, then it is possible to decide in FPT-time if $I$ can be transformed into $J$. As a by product, the TJ-reconfiguration problem is FPT in many well-known classes of graphs such as any minor-free class.


          Recovery of signals by a weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization under arbitrary prior support information. (arXiv:1706.09615v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Wengu Chen, Huanmin Ge

In this paper, we introduce a weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization to recover block sparse signals with arbitrary prior support information. When partial prior support information is available, a sufficient condition based on the high order block RIP is derived to guarantee stable and robust recovery of block sparse signals via the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization. We then show if the accuracy of arbitrary prior block support estimate is at least $50\%$, the sufficient recovery condition by the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_{1}$ minimization is weaker than that by the $\ell_2/\ell_{1}$ minimization, and the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_{1}$ minimization provides better upper bounds on the recovery error in terms of the measurement noise and the compressibility of the signal. Moreover, we illustrate the advantages of the weighted $\ell_2/\ell_1$ minimization approach in the recovery performance of block sparse signals under uniform and non-uniform prior information by extensive numerical experiments. The significance of the results lies in the facts that making explicit use of block sparsity and partial support information of block sparse signals can achieve better recovery performance than handling the signals as being in the conventional sense, thereby ignoring the additional structure and prior support information in the problem.


          Simultaneous Lightwave Information and Power Transfer (SLIPT) for Indoor IoT Applications. (arXiv:1706.09624v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Panagiotis D. Diamantoulakis, George K. Karagiannidis

We present the concept of Simultaneous Lightwave Information and Power Transfer (SLIPT) for indoor Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications. Specifically, we propose novel and fundamental SLIPT strategies, which can be implemented through Visible Light or Infrared communication systems, equipped with a simple solar panel-based receiver. These strategies are performed at the transmitter or at the receiver, or at both sides, named Adjusting transmission, Adjusting reception and Coordinated adjustment of transmission and reception, correspondingly. Furthermore, we deal with the fundamental trade-off between harvested energy and quality-of-service (QoS), by maximizing the harvested energy, while achieving the required user's QoS. To this end, two optimization problems are formulated and optimally solved. Computer simulations validate the optimum solutions and reveal that the proposed strategies considerably increase the harvested energy, compared to SLIPT with fixed policies.


          Deep learning bank distress from news and numerical financial data. (arXiv:1706.09627v1 [stat.ML])   

Authors: Paola Cerchiello, Giancarlo Nicola, Samuel Ronnqvist, Peter Sarlin

In this paper we focus our attention on the exploitation of the information contained in financial news to enhance the performance of a classifier of bank distress. Such information should be analyzed and inserted into the predictive model in the most efficient way and this task deals with all the issues related to text analysis and specifically analysis of news media. Among the different models proposed for such purpose, we investigate one of the possible deep learning approaches, based on a doc2vec representation of the textual data, a kind of neural network able to map the sequential and symbolic text input onto a reduced latent semantic space. Afterwards, a second supervised neural network is trained combining news data with standard financial figures to classify banks whether in distressed or tranquil states, based on a small set of known distress events. Then the final aim is not only the improvement of the predictive performance of the classifier but also to assess the importance of news data in the classification process. Does news data really bring more useful information not contained in standard financial variables? Our results seem to confirm such hypothesis.


          Considerations about Continuous Experimentation for Resource-Constrained Platforms in Self-Driving Vehicles. (arXiv:1706.09628v1 [cs.SE])   

Authors: Federico Giaimo, Christian Berger, Crispin Kirchner

Autonomous vehicles are slowly becoming reality thanks to the efforts of many academic and industrial organizations. Due to the complexity of the software powering these systems and the dynamicity of the development processes, an architectural solution capable of supporting long-term evolution and maintenance is required.

Continuous Experimentation (CE) is an already increasingly adopted practice in software-intensive web-based software systems to steadily improve them over time. CE allows organizations to steer the development efforts by basing decisions on data collected about the system in its field of application. Despite the advantages of Continuous Experimentation, this practice is only rarely adopted in cyber-physical systems and in the automotive domain. Reasons for this include the strict safety constraints and the computational capabilities needed from the target systems.

In this work, a concept for using Continuous Experimentation for resource-constrained platforms like a self-driving vehicle is outlined.


          Weakly-supervised localization of diabetic retinopathy lesions in retinal fundus images. (arXiv:1706.09634v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Waleed M. Gondal, Jan M. Köhler, René Grzeszick, Gernot A. Fink, Michael Hirsch

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) show impressive performance for image classification and detection, extending heavily to the medical image domain. Nevertheless, medical experts are sceptical in these predictions as the nonlinear multilayer structure resulting in a classification outcome is not directly graspable. Recently, approaches have been shown which help the user to understand the discriminative regions within an image which are decisive for the CNN to conclude to a certain class. Although these approaches could help to build trust in the CNNs predictions, they are only slightly shown to work with medical image data which often poses a challenge as the decision for a class relies on different lesion areas scattered around the entire image. Using the DiaretDB1 dataset, we show that on retina images different lesion areas fundamental for diabetic retinopathy are detected on an image level with high accuracy, comparable or exceeding supervised methods. On lesion level, we achieve few false positives with high sensitivity, though, the network is solely trained on image-level labels which do not include information about existing lesions. Classifying between diseased and healthy images, we achieve an AUC of 0.954 on the DiaretDB1.


          SocialStegDisc: Application of steganography in social networks to create a file system. (arXiv:1706.09641v1 [cs.CR])   

Authors: Jedrzej Bieniasz, Krzysztof Szczypiorski

The concept named SocialStegDisc was introduced as an application of the original idea of StegHash method. This new kind of mass-storage was characterized by unlimited space. The design also attempted to improve the operation of StegHash by trade-off between memory requirements and computation time. Applying the mechanism of linked list provided the set of operations on files: creation, reading, deletion and modification. Features, limitations and opportunities were discussed.


          Joint Optimal Pricing and Electrical Efficiency Enforcement for Rational Agents in Micro Grids. (arXiv:1706.09646v1 [cs.SY])   

Authors: Riccardo Bonetto, Michele Rossi, Stefano Tomasin, Carlo Fischione

In electrical distribution grids, the constantly increasing number of power generation devices based on renewables demands a transition from a centralized to a distributed generation paradigm. In fact, power injection from Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) can be selectively controlled to achieve other objectives beyond supporting loads, such as the minimization of the power losses along the distribution lines and the subsequent increase of the grid hosting capacity. However, these technical achievements are only possible if alongside electrical optimization schemes, a suitable market model is set up to promote cooperation from the end users. In contrast with the existing literature, where energy trading and electrical optimization of the grid are often treated separately or the trading strategy is tailored to a specific electrical optimization objective, in this work we consider their joint optimization. Specifically, we present a multi-objective optimization problem accounting for energy trading, where: 1) DERs try to maximize their profit, resulting from selling their surplus energy, 2) the loads try to minimize their expense, and 3) the main power supplier aims at maximizing the electrical grid efficiency through a suitable discount policy. This optimization problem is proved to be non convex, and an equivalent convex formulation is derived. Centralized solutions are discussed first, and are subsequently distributed. Numerical results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the so obtained optimal policies are then presented.


          Machine Learning Approaches to Energy Consumption Forecasting in Households. (arXiv:1706.09648v1 [cs.NE])   

Authors: Riccardo Bonetto, Michele Rossi

We consider the problem of power demand forecasting in residential micro-grids. Several approaches using ARMA models, support vector machines, and recurrent neural networks that perform one-step ahead predictions have been proposed in the literature. Here, we extend them to perform multi-step ahead forecasting and we compare their performance. Toward this end, we implement a parallel and efficient training framework, using power demand traces from real deployments to gauge the accuracy of the considered techniques. Our results indicate that machine learning schemes achieve smaller prediction errors in the mean and the variance with respect to ARMA, but there is no clear algorithm of choice among them. Pros and cons of these approaches are discussed and the solution of choice is found to depend on the specific use case requirements. A hybrid approach, that is driven by the prediction interval, the target error, and its uncertainty, is then recommended.


          Co-salient Object Detection Based on Deep Saliency Networks and Seed Propagation over an Integrated Graph. (arXiv:1706.09650v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Dong-ju Jeong, Insung Hwang, Nam Ik Cho

This paper presents a co-salient object detection method to find common salient regions in a set of images. We utilize deep saliency networks to transfer co-saliency prior knowledge and better capture high-level semantic information, and the resulting initial co-saliency maps are enhanced by seed propagation steps over an integrated graph. The deep saliency networks are trained in a supervised manner to avoid online weakly supervised learning and exploit them not only to extract high-level features but also to produce both intra- and inter-image saliency maps. Through a refinement step, the initial co-saliency maps can uniformly highlight co-salient regions and locate accurate object boundaries. To handle input image groups inconsistent in size, we propose to pool multi-regional descriptors including both within-segment and within-group information. In addition, the integrated multilayer graph is constructed to find the regions that the previous steps may not detect by seed propagation with low-level descriptors. In this work, we utilize the useful complementary components of high-, low-level information, and several learning-based steps. Our experiments have demonstrated that the proposed approach outperforms comparable co-saliency detection methods on widely used public databases and can also be directly applied to co-segmentation tasks.


          Dynamic coupling of a finite element solver to large-scale atomistic simulations. (arXiv:1706.09661v1 [physics.comp-ph])   

Authors: Mihkel Veske, Andreas Kyritsakis, Kristjan Eimre, Vahur Zadin, Alvo Aabloo, Flyura Djurabekova

We propose a method for efficiently coupling the finite element method with atomistic simulations, while using molecular dynamics or kinetic Monte Carlo techniques. Our method can dynamically build an optimized unstructured mesh that follows the geometry defined by atomistic data. On this mesh, different multiphysics problems can be solved to obtain distributions of physical quantities of interest, which can be fed back to the atomistic system. The simulation flow is optimized to maximize computational efficiency while maintaining good accuracy. This is achieved by providing the modules for a) optimization of the density of the generated mesh according to requirements of a specific geometry and b) efficient extension of the finite element domain without a need to extend the atomistic one. Our method is organized as an open-source C++ code. In the current implementation, an efficient Laplace equation solver for calculation of electric field distribution near rough atomistic surface demonstrates the capability of the suggested approach.


          Comparing Information-Theoretic Measures of Complexity in Boltzmann Machines. (arXiv:1706.09667v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Maxinder S. Kanwal, Joshua A. Grochow, Nihat Ay

In the past three decades, many theoretical measures of complexity have been proposed to help understand complex systems. In this work, for the first time, we place these measures on a level playing field, to explore the qualitative similarities and differences between them, and their shortcomings. Specifically, using the Boltzmann machine architecture (a fully connected recurrent neural network) with uniformly distributed weights as our model of study, we numerically measure how complexity changes as a function of network dynamics and network parameters. We apply an extension of one such information-theoretic measure of complexity to understand incremental Hebbian learning in Hopfield networks, a fully recurrent architecture model of autoassociative memory. In the course of Hebbian learning, the total information flow reflects a natural upward trend in complexity as the network attempts to learn more and more patterns.


          Improving Distributed Representations of Tweets - Present and Future. (arXiv:1706.09673v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Ganesh J

Unsupervised representation learning for tweets is an important research field which helps in solving several business applications such as sentiment analysis, hashtag prediction, paraphrase detection and microblog ranking. A good tweet representation learning model must handle the idiosyncratic nature of tweets which poses several challenges such as short length, informal words, unusual grammar and misspellings. However, there is a lack of prior work which surveys the representation learning models with a focus on tweets. In this work, we organize the models based on its objective function which aids the understanding of the literature. We also provide interesting future directions, which we believe are fruitful in advancing this field by building high-quality tweet representation learning models.


          Power-Based Direction-of-Arrival Estimation Using a Single Multi-Mode Antenna. (arXiv:1706.09690v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Robert Pöhlmann, Siwei Zhang, Thomas Jost, Armin Dammann

Phased antenna arrays are widely used for direction-of-arrival (DoA) estimation. For low-cost applications, signal power or received signal strength indicator (RSSI) based approaches can be an alternative. However, they usually require multiple antennas, a single antenna that can be rotated, or switchable antenna beams. In this paper we show how a multi-mode antenna (MMA) can be used for power-based DoA estimation. Only a single MMA is needed and neither rotation nor switching of antenna beams is required. We derive an estimation scheme as well as theoretical bounds and validate them through simulations. It is found that power-based DoA estimation with an MMA is feasible and accurate.


          Speaker Identification in the Shouted Environment Using Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models. (arXiv:1706.09691v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

In this paper, Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (SPHMMs) have been used to enhance the recognition performance of text-dependent speaker identification in the shouted environment. Our speech database consists of two databases: our collected database and the Speech Under Simulated and Actual Stress (SUSAS) database. Our results show that SPHMMs significantly enhance speaker identification performance compared to Second-Order Circular Hidden Markov Models (CHMM2s) in the shouted environment. Using our collected database, speaker identification performance in this environment is 68% and 75% based on CHMM2s and SPHMMs respectively. Using the SUSAS database, speaker identification performance in the same environment is 71% and 79% based on CHMM2s and SPHMMs respectively.


          Image classification using local tensor singular value decompositions. (arXiv:1706.09693v1 [stat.ML])   

Authors: Elizabeth Newman, Misha Kilmer, Lior Horesh

From linear classifiers to neural networks, image classification has been a widely explored topic in mathematics, and many algorithms have proven to be effective classifiers. However, the most accurate classifiers typically have significantly high storage costs, or require complicated procedures that may be computationally expensive. We present a novel (nonlinear) classification approach using truncation of local tensor singular value decompositions (tSVD) that robustly offers accurate results, while maintaining manageable storage costs. Our approach takes advantage of the optimality of the representation under the tensor algebra described to determine to which class an image belongs. We extend our approach to a method that can determine specific pairwise match scores, which could be useful in, for example, object recognition problems where pose/position are different. We demonstrate the promise of our new techniques on the MNIST data set.


          On the relation between representations and computability. (arXiv:1706.09696v1 [cs.CC])   

Authors: Jaun Casanova, Simone Santini

One of the fundamental results in computability is the existence of well-defined functions that cannot be computed. In this paper we study the effects of data representation on computability; we show that, while for each possible way of representing data there exist incomputable functions, the computability of a specific abstract function is never an absolute property, but depends on the representation used for the function domain. We examine the scope of this dependency and provide mathematical criteria to favour some representations over others. As we shall show, there are strong reasons to suggest that computational enumerability should be an additional axiom for computation models. We analyze the link between the techniques and effects of representation changes and those of oracle machines, showing an important connection between their hierarchies. Finally, these notions enable us to gain a new insight on the Church-Turing thesis: its interpretation as the underlying algebraic structure to which computation is invariant.


          Linking Sketches and Diagrams to Source Code Artifacts. (arXiv:1706.09700v1 [cs.SE])   

Authors: Sebastian Baltes, Peter Schmitz, Stephan Diehl

Recent studies have shown that sketches and diagrams play an important role in the daily work of software developers. If these visual artifacts are archived, they are often detached from the source code they document, because there is no adequate tool support to assist developers in capturing, archiving, and retrieving sketches related to certain source code artifacts. This paper presents SketchLink, a tool that aims at increasing the value of sketches and diagrams created during software development by supporting developers in these tasks. Our prototype implementation provides a web application that employs the camera of smartphones and tablets to capture analog sketches, but can also be used on desktop computers to upload, for instance, computer-generated diagrams. We also implemented a plugin for a Java IDE that embeds the links in Javadoc comments and visualizes them in situ in the source code editor as graphical icons.


          Composition of Gray Isometries. (arXiv:1706.09705v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Sierra Marie M. Lauresta, Virgilio P. Sison

In classical coding theory, Gray isometries are usually defined as mappings between finite Frobenius rings, which include the ring $Z_m$ of integers modulo $m$, and the finite fields. In this paper, we derive an isometric mapping from $Z_8$ to $Z_4^2$ from the composition of the Gray isometries on $Z_8$ and on $Z_4^2$. The image under this composition of a $Z_8$-linear block code of length $n$ with homogeneous distance $d$ is a (not necessarily linear) quaternary block code of length $2n$ with Lee distance $d$.


          Modified Optimal Velocity Model: Stability Analyses and Design Guidelines. (arXiv:1706.09706v1 [cs.SY])   

Authors: Gopal Krishna Kamath, Krishna Jagannathan, Gaurav Raina

Reaction delays are important in determining the qualitative dynamical properties of a platoon of vehicles traveling on a straight road. In this paper, we investigate the impact of delayed feedback on the dynamics of the Modified Optimal Velocity Model (MOVM). Specifically, we analyze the MOVM in three regimes -- no delay, small delay and arbitrary delay. In the absence of reaction delays, we show that the MOVM is locally stable. For small delays, we then derive a sufficient condition for the MOVM to be locally stable. Next, for an arbitrary delay, we derive the necessary and sufficient condition for the local stability of the MOVM. We show that the traffic flow transits from the locally stable to the locally unstable regime via a Hopf bifurcation. We also derive the necessary and sufficient condition for non-oscillatory convergence and characterize the rate of convergence of the MOVM. These conditions help ensure smooth traffic flow, good ride quality and quick equilibration to the uniform flow. Further, since a Hopf bifurcation results in the emergence of limit cycles, we provide an analytical framework to characterize the type of the Hopf bifurcation and the asymptotic orbital stability of the resulting non-linear oscillations. Finally, we corroborate our analyses using stability charts, bifurcation diagrams, numerical computations and simulations conducted using MATLAB.


          Smart Asset Management for Electric Utilities: Big Data and Future. (arXiv:1706.09711v1 [cs.OH])   

Authors: Swasti R. Khuntia, Jose L. Rueda, Mart A.M.M. van der Meijden

This paper discusses about needs and ways to improve predictive maintenance in the future while facilitating the electric utilities to make smarter decisions about when and where maintenance should be performed. Utilities have been collecting data in large amounts but they are hardly utilized because they are huge in amount and also there is uncertainty associated with it. Condition monitoring of assets collects large amounts of data during daily operations. The question arises 'How to extract information from this large chunk of data?' The concept of 'rich data and poor information' is being challenged by big data analytics. Along with technological advancements like Internet of Things, big data analytics will play an important role for electric utilities. The aim will be to make the current asset management more smarter than it was, and this work describes some pathways.


          Constrained Type Families. (arXiv:1706.09715v1 [cs.PL])   

Authors: J. Garrett Morris, Richard Eisenberg

We present an approach to support partiality in type-level computation without compromising expressiveness or type safety. Existing frameworks for type-level computation either require totality or implicitly assume it. For example, type families in Haskell provide a powerful, modular means of defining type-level computation. However, their current design implicitly assumes that type families are total, introducing nonsensical types and significantly complicating the metatheory of type families and their extensions. We propose an alternative design, using qualified types to pair type-level computations with predicates that capture their domains. Our approach naturally captures the intuitive partiality of type families, simplifying their metatheory. As evidence, we present the first complete proof of consistency for a language with closed type families.


          Enhancing speaker identification performance under the shouted talking condition using second-order circular hidden Markov models. (arXiv:1706.09716v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

It is known that the performance of speaker identification systems is high under the neutral talking condition; however, the performance deteriorates under the shouted talking condition. In this paper, second-order circular hidden Markov models (CHMM2s) have been proposed and implemented to enhance the performance of isolated-word text-dependent speaker identification systems under the shouted talking condition. Our results show that CHMM2s significantly improve speaker identification performance under such a condition compared to the first-order left-to-right hidden Markov models (LTRHMM1s), second-order left-to-right hidden Markov models (LTRHMM2s), and the first-order circular hidden Markov models (CHMM1s). Under the shouted talking condition, our results show that the average speaker identification performance is 23% based on LTRHMM1s, 59% based on LTRHMM2s, and 60% based on CHMM1s. On the other hand, the average speaker identification performance under the same talking condition based on CHMM2s is 72%.


          Iterative Spectral Clustering for Unsupervised Object Localization. (arXiv:1706.09719v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Aditya Vora, Shanmuganathan Raman

This paper addresses the problem of unsupervised object localization in an image. Unlike previous supervised and weakly supervised algorithms that require bounding box or image level annotations for training classifiers in order to learn features representing the object, we propose a simple yet effective technique for localization using iterative spectral clustering. This iterative spectral clustering approach along with appropriate cluster selection strategy in each iteration naturally helps in searching of object region in the image. In order to estimate the final localization window, we group the proposals obtained from the iterative spectral clustering step based on the perceptual similarity, and average the coordinates of the proposals from the top scoring groups. We benchmark our algorithm on challenging datasets like Object Discovery and PASCAL VOC 2007, achieving an average CorLoc percentage of 51% and 35% respectively which is comparable to various other weakly supervised algorithms despite being completely unsupervised.


          Employing Second-Order Circular Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models to Enhance Speaker Identification Performance in Shouted Talking Environments. (arXiv:1706.09722v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

Speaker identification performance is almost perfect in neutral talking environments; however, the performance is deteriorated significantly in shouted talking environments. This work is devoted to proposing, implementing and evaluating new models called Second-Order Circular Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (CSPHMM2s) to alleviate the deteriorated performance in the shouted talking environments. These proposed models possess the characteristics of both Circular Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (CSPHMMs) and Second-Order Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (SPHMM2s). The results of this work show that CSPHMM2s outperform each of: First-Order Left-to-Right Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (LTRSPHMM1s), Second-Order Left-to-Right Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (LTRSPHMM2s) and First-Order Circular Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (CSPHMM1s) in the shouted talking environments. In such talking environments and using our collected speech database, average speaker identification performance based on LTRSPHMM1s, LTRSPHMM2s, CSPHMM1s and CSPHMM2s is 74.6%, 78.4%, 78.7% and 83.4%, respectively. Speaker identification performance obtained based on CSPHMM2s is close to that obtained based on subjective assessment by human listeners.


          Kinematics and workspace analysis of a 3ppps parallel robot with u-shaped base. (arXiv:1706.09724v1 [cs.RO])   

Authors: Damien Chablat (IRCCyN), Luc Baron (EPM), Ranjan Jha (EPM)

This paper presents the kinematic analysis of the 3-PPPS parallel robot with an equilateral mobile platform and a U-shape base. The proposed design and appropriate selection of parameters allow to formulate simpler direct and inverse kinematics for the manipulator under study. The parallel singularities associated with the manipulator depend only on the orientation of the end-effector, and thus depend only on the orientation of the end effector. The quaternion parameters are used to represent the aspects, i.e. the singularity free regions of the workspace. A cylindrical algebraic decomposition is used to characterize the workspace and joint space with a low number of cells. The dis-criminant variety is obtained to describe the boundaries of each cell. With these simplifications, the 3-PPPS parallel robot with proposed design can be claimed as the simplest 6 DOF robot, which further makes it useful for the industrial applications.


          Improvement Of Email Threats Detection By User Training. (arXiv:1706.09727v1 [cs.CR])   

Authors: P-Y. Cousin, V. Bernard, A. Lefaillet, M. Mugaruka, C. Raibaud

With the generalization of mobile communication systems, solicitations of all kinds in the form of messages and emails are received by users with increasing proportion of malicious ones. They are customized to pass anti-spam filters and ask the person to click or to open the joined dangerous attachment. Current filters are very inefficient against spear phishing emails. It is proposed to improve the existing filters by taking advantage of user own analysis and feedback to detect all kinds of phishing emails. The method rests upon an interface displaying different warnings to receivers. Analysis shows that users trust their first impression and are often lead to ignore warnings flagged by proposed new interactive system.


          Talking Condition Recognition in Stressful and Emotional Talking Environments Based on CSPHMM2s. (arXiv:1706.09729v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin, Mohammed Nasser Ba-Hutair

This work is aimed at exploiting Second-Order Circular Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (CSPHMM2s) as classifiers to enhance talking condition recognition in stressful and emotional talking environments (completely two separate environments). The stressful talking environment that has been used in this work uses Speech Under Simulated and Actual Stress (SUSAS) database, while the emotional talking environment uses Emotional Prosody Speech and Transcripts (EPST) database. The achieved results of this work using Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs) demonstrate that CSPHMM2s outperform each of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), Second-Order Circular Hidden Markov Models (CHMM2s), and Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (SPHMMs) in enhancing talking condition recognition in the stressful and emotional talking environments. The results also show that the performance of talking condition recognition in stressful talking environments leads that in emotional talking environments by 3.67% based on CSPHMM2s. Our results obtained in subjective evaluation by human judges fall within 2.14% and 3.08% of those obtained, respectively, in stressful and emotional talking environments based on CSPHMM2s.


          Stronger Baselines for Trustable Results in Neural Machine Translation. (arXiv:1706.09733v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Michael Denkowski, Graham Neubig

Interest in neural machine translation has grown rapidly as its effectiveness has been demonstrated across language and data scenarios. New research regularly introduces architectural and algorithmic improvements that lead to significant gains over "vanilla" NMT implementations. However, these new techniques are rarely evaluated in the context of previously published techniques, specifically those that are widely used in state-of-theart production and shared-task systems. As a result, it is often difficult to determine whether improvements from research will carry over to systems deployed for real-world use. In this work, we recommend three specific methods that are relatively easy to implement and result in much stronger experimental systems. Beyond reporting significantly higher BLEU scores, we conduct an in-depth analysis of where improvements originate and what inherent weaknesses of basic NMT models are being addressed. We then compare the relative gains afforded by several other techniques proposed in the literature when starting with vanilla systems versus our stronger baselines, showing that experimental conclusions may change depending on the baseline chosen. This indicates that choosing a strong baseline is crucial for reporting reliable experimental results.


          Speaking Style Authentication Using Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models. (arXiv:1706.09736v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

The importance of speaking style authentication from human speech is gaining an increasing attention and concern from the engineering community. The importance comes from the demand to enhance both the naturalness and efficiency of spoken language human-machine interface. Our work in this research focuses on proposing, implementing, and testing speaker-dependent and text-dependent speaking style authentication (verification) systems that accept or reject the identity claim of a speaking style based on suprasegmental hidden Markov models (SPHMMs). Based on using SPHMMs, our results show that the average speaking style authentication performance is: 99%, 37%, 85%, 60%, 61%, 59%, 41%, 61%, and 57% belonging respectively to the speaking styles: neutral, shouted, slow, loud, soft, fast, angry, happy, and fearful.


          Indoor UAV scheduling with Restful Task Assignment Algorithm. (arXiv:1706.09737v1 [cs.AI])   

Authors: Yohanes Khosiawan, Izabela Nielsen

Research in UAV scheduling has obtained an emerging interest from scientists in the optimization field. When the scheduling itself has established a strong root since the 19th century, works on UAV scheduling in indoor environment has come forth in the latest decade. Several works on scheduling UAV operations in indoor (two and three dimensional) and outdoor environments are reported. In this paper, a further study on UAV scheduling in three dimensional indoor environment is investigated. Dealing with indoor environment\textemdash where humans, UAVs, and other elements or infrastructures are likely to coexist in the same space\textemdash draws attention towards the safety of the operations. In relation to the battery level, a preserved battery level leads to safer operations, promoting the UAV to have a decent remaining power level. A methodology which consists of a heuristic approach based on Restful Task Assignment Algorithm, incorporated with Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm, is proposed. The motivation is to preserve the battery level throughout the operations, which promotes less possibility in having failed UAVs on duty. This methodology is tested with 54 benchmark datasets stressing on 4 different aspects: geographical distance, number of tasks, number of predecessors, and slack time. The test results and their characteristics in regard to the proposed methodology are discussed and presented.


          A Deep Multimodal Approach for Cold-start Music Recommendation. (arXiv:1706.09739v1 [cs.IR])   

Authors: Sergio Oramas, Oriol Nieto, Mohamed Sordo, Xavier Serra

An increasing amount of digital music is being published daily. Music streaming services often ingest all available music, but this poses a challenge: how to recommend new artists for which prior knowledge is scarce? In this work we aim to address this so-called cold-start problem by combining text and audio information with user feedback data using deep network architectures. Our method is divided into three steps. First, artist embeddings are learned from biographies by combining semantics, text features, and aggregated usage data. Second, track embeddings are learned from the audio signal and available feedback data. Finally, artist and track embeddings are combined in a multimodal network. Results suggest that both splitting the recommendation problem between feature levels (i.e., artist metadata and audio track), and merging feature embeddings in a multimodal approach improve the accuracy of the recommendations.


          AP17-OLR Challenge: Data, Plan, and Baseline. (arXiv:1706.09742v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Zhiyuan Tang, Dong Wang, Yixiang Chen, Qing Chen

We present the data profile and the evaluation plan of the second oriental language recognition (OLR) challenge AP17-OLR. Compared to the event last year (AP16-OLR), the new challenge involves more languages and focuses more on short utterances. The data is offered by SpeechOcean and the NSFC M2ASR project. Two types of baselines are constructed to assist the participants, one is based on the i-vector model and the other is based on various neural networks. We report the baseline results evaluated with various metrics defined by the AP17-OLR evaluation plan and demonstrate that the combined database is a reasonable data resource for multilingual research. All the data is free for participants, and the Kaldi recipes for the baselines have been published online.


          Filter Bank Multicarrier in Massive MIMO: Analysis and Channel Equalization. (arXiv:1706.09744v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Amir Aminjavaheri, Arman Farhang, Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny

We perform an asymptotic study of the performance of filter bank multicarrier (FBMC) in the context of massive multi-input multi-output (MIMO). We show that the effects of channel distortions, i.e., intersymbol interference and intercarrier interference, do not vanish as the base station (BS) array size increases. As a result, the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) cannot grow unboundedly by increasing the number of BS antennas, and is upper bounded by a certain deterministic value. We show that this phenomenon is a result of the correlation between the multi-antenna combining tap values and the channel impulse responses between the mobile terminals and the BS antennas. To resolve this problem, we introduce an efficient equalization method that removes this correlation, enabling us to achieve arbitrarily large SINR values by increasing the number of BS antennas. We perform a thorough analysis of the proposed system and find analytical expressions for both equalizer coefficients and the respective SINR.


          On Sampling Edges Almost Uniformly. (arXiv:1706.09748v1 [cs.CC])   

Authors: Talya Eden, Will Rosenbaum

We consider the problem of sampling an edge almost uniformly from an unknown graph, $G = (V, E)$. Access to the graph is provided via queries of the following types: (1) uniform vertex queries, (2) degree queries, and (3) neighbor queries. We describe an algorithm that returns a random edge $e \in E$ using $\tilde{O}(n / \sqrt{\varepsilon m})$ queries in expectation, where $n = |V|$ is the number of vertices, and $m = |E|$ is the number of edges, such that each edge $e$ is sampled with probability $(1 \pm \varepsilon)/m$. We prove that our algorithm is optimal in the sense that any algorithm that samples an edge from an almost-uniform distribution must perform $\Omega(n / \sqrt{m})$ queries.


          Pattern of Internet Usage in Cyber Cafes in Manila: An Exploratory Study. (arXiv:1706.09749v1 [cs.CY])   

Authors: Rex P. Bringula, Rex P. Bringula, Rex P. Bringula, Mikael Manuel, Katrina Panganiban

This study determined the profile and pattern of Internet usage of respondents in cyber cafes in Manila. The study employed an exploratory-descriptive design in which a validated descriptive-survey form was used as the research instrument. Forty-seven cyber cafes in 14 districts in the City of Manila were randomly selected. There were 545 respondents. It was found that most of the respondents were Manila settlers (f = 368, 70%), students (f = 382, 73%), pursuing or had attained a college degree (f = 374, 72%), male (f = 356, 68%), young (19 and below) (f = 314, 60%), Roman Catholic (f = 423, 81%), single (f = 470, 90%), had a computer at home (f = 269, 51%), belonged to the middle-income class (f = 334, 64%), and used the Internet in the afternoon (f = 274, 50.3%,chi^2 = 113.98, DF = 2, p < 0.01) once to twice a week (f = 193, 36.9%, chi^2 = 90.04, DF = 3, p < 0.01). Frequency of visit of Internet users was not equally distributed during the week and Internet users showed the tendency to visit cyber cafes at a particular time of the day when grouped according to profile. The first hypothesis stated that frequency of visiting a cyber cafe would not be equally distributed during the week when grouped according to profile was accepted. The second hypothesis, which stated that respondents would not show a tendency to use the internet in a cyber cafe at a particular time of the day was rejected. The study also discusses the limitations and implications of the findings.


          Bounds on Information Combining With Quantum Side Information. (arXiv:1706.09752v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Christoph Hirche, David Reeb

"Bounds on information combining" are entropic inequalities that determine how the information (entropy) of a set of random variables can change when these are combined in certain prescribed ways. Such bounds play an important role in classical information theory, particularly in coding and Shannon theory; entropy power inequalities are special instances of them. The arguably most elementary kind of information combining is the addition of two binary random variables (a CNOT gate), and the resulting quantities play an important role in Belief propagation and Polar coding. We investigate this problem in the setting where quantum side information is available, which has been recognized as a hard setting for entropy power inequalities.

Our main technical result is a non-trivial, and close to optimal, lower bound on the combined entropy, which can be seen as an almost optimal "quantum Mrs. Gerber's Lemma". Our proof uses three main ingredients: (1) a new bound on the concavity of von Neumann entropy, which is tight in the regime of low pairwise state fidelities; (2) the quantitative improvement of strong subadditivity due to Fawzi-Renner, in which we manage to handle the minimization over recovery maps; (3) recent duality results on classical-quantum-channels due to Renes et al. We furthermore present conjectures on the optimal lower and upper bounds under quantum side information, supported by interesting analytical observations and strong numerical evidence.

We finally apply our bounds to Polar coding for binary-input classical-quantum channels, and show the following three results: (A) Even non-stationary channels polarize under the polar transform. (B) The blocklength required to approach the symmetric capacity scales at most sub-exponentially in the gap to capacity. (C) Under the aforementioned lower bound conjecture, a blocklength polynomial in the gap suffices.


          Speaker Identification Investigation and Analysis in Unbiased and Biased Emotional Talking Environments. (arXiv:1706.09754v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

This work aims at investigating and analyzing speaker identification in each unbiased and biased emotional talking environments based on a classifier called Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (SPHMMs). The first talking environment is unbiased towards any emotion, while the second talking environment is biased towards different emotions. Each of these talking environments is made up of six distinct emotions. These emotions are neutral, angry, sad, happy, disgust and fear. The investigation and analysis of this work show that speaker identification performance in the biased talking environment is superior to that in the unbiased talking environment. The obtained results in this work are close to those achieved in subjective assessment by human judges.


          Using Second-Order Hidden Markov Model to Improve Speaker Identification Recognition Performance under Neutral Condition. (arXiv:1706.09758v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

In this paper, second-order hidden Markov model (HMM2) has been used and implemented to improve the recognition performance of text-dependent speaker identification systems under neutral talking condition. Our results show that HMM2 improves the recognition performance under neutral talking condition compared to the first-order hidden Markov model (HMM1). The recognition performance has been improved by 9%.


          Employing both Gender and Emotion Cues to Enhance Speaker Identification Performance in Emotional Talking Environments. (arXiv:1706.09760v1 [cs.SD])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

Speaker recognition performance in emotional talking environments is not as high as it is in neutral talking environments. This work focuses on proposing, implementing, and evaluating a new approach to enhance the performance in emotional talking environments. The new proposed approach is based on identifying the unknown speaker using both his/her gender and emotion cues. Both Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (SPHMMs) have been used as classifiers in this work. This approach has been tested on our collected emotional speech database which is composed of six emotions. The results of this work show that speaker identification performance based on using both gender and emotion cues is higher than that based on using gender cues only, emotion cues only, and neither gender nor emotion cues by 7.22%, 4.45%, and 19.56%, respectively. This work also shows that the optimum speaker identification performance takes place when the classifiers are completely biased towards suprasegmental models and no impact of acoustic models in the emotional talking environments. The achieved average speaker identification performance based on the new proposed approach falls within 2.35% of that obtained in subjective evaluation by human judges.


          Dynamical selection of Nash equilibria using Experience Weighted Attraction Learning: emergence of heterogeneous mixed equilibria. (arXiv:1706.09763v1 [cs.GT])   

Authors: Robin Nicole, Peter Sollich

We study the distribution of strategies in a large game that models how agents choose among different double auction markets. We classify the possible mean field Nash equilibria, which include potentially segregated states where an agent population can split into subpopulations adopting different strategies. As the game is aggregative, the actual equilibrium strategy distributions remain undetermined, however. We therefore compare with the results of Experience-Weighted Attraction (EWA) learning, which at long times leads to Nash equilibria in the appropriate limits of large intensity of choice, low noise (long agent memory) and perfect imputation of missing scores (fictitious play). The learning dynamics breaks the indeterminacy of the Nash equilibria. Non-trivially, depending on how the relevant limits are taken, more than one type of equilibrium can be selected. These include the standard homogeneous mixed and heterogeneous pure states, but also \emph{heterogeneous mixed} states where different agents play different strategies that are not all pure. The analysis of the EWA learning involves Fokker-Planck modeling combined with large deviation methods. The theoretical results are confirmed by multi-agent simulations.


          Multi-tap Digital Canceller for Full-Duplex Applications. (arXiv:1706.09764v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Paul Ferrand, Melissa Duarte

We identify phase noise as a bottleneck for the performance of digital self-interference cancellers that utilize a single auxiliary receiver---single-tap digital cancellers---and operate in multipath propagation environments. Our analysis demonstrates that the degradation due to phase noise is caused by a mismatch between the analog delay of the auxiliary receiver and the different delays of the multipath components of the self-interference signal. We propose a novel multi-tap digital self-interference canceller architecture that is based on multiple auxiliary receivers and a customized Normalized-Least-Mean-Squared (NLMS) filtering for self-interference regeneration. Our simulation results demonstrate that our proposed architecture is more robust to phase noise impairments and can in some cases achieve 10~dB larger self-interference cancellation than the single-tap architecture.


          Numerical Semigroups and Codes. (arXiv:1706.09765v1 [math.NT])   

Authors: Maria Bras-Amorós

A numerical semigroup is a subset of N containing 0, closed under addition and with finite complement in N. An important example of numerical semigroup is given by the Weierstrass semigroup at one point of a curve. In the theory of algebraic geometry codes, Weierstrass semigroups are crucial for defining bounds on the minimum distance as well as for defining improvements on the dimension of codes. We present these applications and some theoretical problems related to classification, characterization and counting of numerical semigroups.


          Speaker Identification in each of the Neutral and Shouted Talking Environments based on Gender-Dependent Approach Using SPHMMs. (arXiv:1706.09767v1 [cs.AI])   

Authors: Ismail Shahin

It is well known that speaker identification performs extremely well in the neutral talking environments; however, the identification performance is declined sharply in the shouted talking environments. This work aims at proposing, implementing and testing a new approach to enhance the declined performance in the shouted talking environments. The new proposed approach is based on gender-dependent speaker identification using Suprasegmental Hidden Markov Models (SPHMMs) as classifiers. This proposed approach has been tested on two different and separate speech databases: our collected database and the Speech Under Simulated and Actual Stress (SUSAS) database. The results of this work show that gender-dependent speaker identification based on SPHMMs outperforms gender-independent speaker identification based on the same models and gender-dependent speaker identification based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) by about 6% and 8%, respectively. The results obtained based on the proposed approach are close to those obtained in subjective evaluation by human judges.


          New Lower Bounds on the Generalized Hamming Weights of AG Codes. (arXiv:1706.09770v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Maria Bras-Amorós, Kwankyu Lee, Albert Vico-Oton

A sharp upper bound for the maximum integer not belonging to an ideal of a numerical semigroup is given and the ideals attaining this bound are characterized. Then the result is used, through the so-called Feng-Rao numbers, to bound the generalized Hamming weights of algebraic-geometry codes. This is further developed for Hermitian codes and the codes on one of the Garcia-Stichtenoth towers, as well as for some more general families.


          A Survey of Security Assessment Ontologies. (arXiv:1706.09771v1 [cs.SE])   

Authors: Ferrucio de Franco Rosa, Mario Jino

A literature survey on ontologies concerning the Security Assessment domain has been carried out to uncover initiatives that aim at formalizing concepts from the Security Assessment field of research. A preliminary analysis and a discussion on the selected works are presented. Our main contribution is an updated literature review, describing key characteristics, results, research issues, and application domains of the papers. We have also detected gaps in the Security Assessment literature that could be the subject of further studies in the field. This work is meant to be useful for security researchers who wish to adopt a formal approach in their methods.


          The Security Assessment Domain: A Survey of Taxonomies and Ontologies. (arXiv:1706.09772v1 [cs.SE])   

Authors: Ferrucio de Franco Rosa, Rodrigo Bonacin, Mario Jino

The use of ontologies and taxonomies contributes by providing means to define concepts, minimize the ambiguity, improve the interoperability and manage knowledge of the security domain. Thus, this paper presents a literature survey on ontologies and taxonomies concerning the Security Assessment domain. We carried out it to uncover initiatives that aim at formalizing concepts from the Information Security and Test and Assessment fields of research. We applied a systematic review approach in seven scientific databases. 138 papers were identified and divided into categories according to their main contributions, namely: Ontology, Taxonomy and Survey. Based on their contents, we selected 47 papers on ontologies, 22 papers on taxonomies, and 11 papers on surveys. A taxonomy has been devised to be used in the evaluation of the papers. Summaries, tables, and a preliminary analysis of the selected works are presented. Our main contributions are: 1) an updated literature review, describing key characteristics, results, research issues, and application domains of the papers; and 2) the taxonomy for the evaluation process. We have also detected gaps in the Security Assessment literature that could be the subject of further studies in the field. This work is meant to be useful for security researchers who wish to adopt a formal approach in their methods and techniques.


          Interpretability via Model Extraction. (arXiv:1706.09773v1 [cs.CY])   

Authors: Osbert Bastani, Carolyn Kim, Hamsa Bastani

The ability to interpret machine learning models has become increasingly important now that machine learning is used to inform consequential decisions. We propose an approach called model extraction for interpreting complex, blackbox models. Our approach approximates the complex model using a much more interpretable model; as long as the approximation quality is good, then statistical properties of the complex model are reflected in the interpretable model. We show how model extraction can be used to understand and debug random forests and neural nets trained on several datasets from the UCI Machine Learning Repository, as well as control policies learned for several classical reinforcement learning problems.


          Numerical assessment of two-level domain decomposition preconditioners for incompressible Stokes and elasticity equations. (arXiv:1706.09776v1 [math.NA])   

Authors: Gabriel R. Barrenechea, Michał Bosy, Victorita Dolean

Solving the linear elasticity and Stokes equations by an optimal domain decomposition method derived algebraically involves the use of non standard interface conditions. The one-level domain decomposition preconditioners are based on the solution of local problems. This has the undesired consequence that the results are not scalable, it means that the number of iterations needed to reach convergence increases with the number of subdomains. This is the reason why in this work we introduce, and test numerically, two-level preconditioners. Such preconditioners use a coarse space in their construction. We consider the nearly incompressible elasticity problems and Stokes equations, and discretise them by using two finite element methods, namely, the hybrid discontinuous Galerkin and Taylor-Hood discretisations.


          Service adoption spreading in online social networks. (arXiv:1706.09777v1 [physics.soc-ph])   

Authors: Gerardo Iñiguez, Zhongyuan Ruan, Kimmo Kaski, János Kertész, Márton Karsai

The collective behaviour of people adopting an innovation, product or online service is commonly interpreted as a spreading phenomenon throughout the fabric of society. This process is arguably driven by social influence, social learning and by external effects like media. Observations of such processes date back to the seminal studies by Rogers and Bass, and their mathematical modelling has taken two directions: One paradigm, called simple contagion, identifies adoption spreading with an epidemic process. The other one, named complex contagion, is concerned with behavioural thresholds and successfully explains the emergence of large cascades of adoption resulting in a rapid spreading often seen in empirical data. The observation of real world adoption processes has become easier lately due to the availability of large digital social network and behavioural datasets. This has allowed simultaneous study of network structures and dynamics of online service adoption, shedding light on the mechanisms and external effects that influence the temporal evolution of behavioural or innovation adoption. These advancements have induced the development of more realistic models of social spreading phenomena, which in turn have provided remarkably good predictions of various empirical adoption processes. In this chapter we review recent data-driven studies addressing real-world service adoption processes. Our studies provide the first detailed empirical evidence of a heterogeneous threshold distribution in adoption. We also describe the modelling of such phenomena with formal methods and data-driven simulations. Our objective is to understand the effects of identified social mechanisms on service adoption spreading, and to provide potential new directions and open questions for future research.


          Opportunistic Scheduling as Restless Bandits. (arXiv:1706.09778v1 [cs.SY])   

Authors: Vivek S. Borkar, Gaurav S. Kasbekar, Sarath Pattathil, Priyesh Y. Shetty

In this paper we consider energy efficient scheduling in a multiuser setting where each user has a finite sized queue and there is a cost associated with holding packets (jobs) in each queue (modeling the delay constraints). The packets of each user need to be sent over a common channel. The channel qualities seen by the users are time-varying and differ across users; also, the cost incurred, i.e., energy consumed, in packet transmission is a function of the channel quality. We pose the problem as an average cost Markov Decision Problem, and prove that this problem is Whittle Indexable. Based on this result, we propose an algorithm in which the Whittle index of each user is computed and the user who has the lowest value is selected for transmission. We evaluate the performance of this algorithm via simulations and show that it achieves a lower average cost than the Maximum Weight Scheduling and Weighted Fair Scheduling strategies.


          Application Protocols enabling Internet of Remote Things via Random Access Satellite Channels. (arXiv:1706.09787v1 [cs.NI])   

Authors: Manlio Bacco, Marco Colucci, Alberto Gotta

Nowadays, Machine-to-Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) traffic rate is increasing at a fast pace. The use of satellites is expected to play a large role in delivering such a traffic. In this work, we investigate the use of two of the most common M2M/IoT protocols stacks on a satellite Random Access (RA) channel, based on DVB-RCS2 standard. The metric under consideration is the completion time, in order to identify the protocol stack that can provide the best performance level.


          Two-Stage Synthesis Networks for Transfer Learning in Machine Comprehension. (arXiv:1706.09789v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: David Golub, Po-Sen Huang, Xiaodong He, Li Deng

We develop a technique for transfer learning in machine comprehension (MC) using a novel two-stage synthesis network (SynNet). Given a high-performing MC model in one domain, our technique aims to answer questions about documents in another domain, where we use no labeled data of question-answer pairs. Using the proposed SynNet with a pretrained model on the SQuAD dataset, we achieve an F1 measure of 46.6% on the challenging NewsQA dataset, approaching performance of in-domain models (F1 measure of 50.0%) and outperforming the out-of-domain baseline by 7.6%, without use of provided annotations.


          Feature uncertainty bounding schemes for large robust nonlinear SVM classifiers. (arXiv:1706.09795v1 [stat.ML])   

Authors: Nicolas Couellan, Sophie Jan

We consider the binary classification problem when data are large and subject to unknown but bounded uncertainties. We address the problem by formulating the nonlinear support vector machine training problem with robust optimization. To do so, we analyze and propose two bounding schemes for uncertainties associated to random approximate features in low dimensional spaces. The proposed techniques are based on Random Fourier Features and the Nystr\"om methods. The resulting formulations can be solved with efficient stochastic approximation techniques such as stochastic (sub)-gradient, stochastic proximal gradient techniques or their variants.


          Relevance of Unsupervised Metrics in Task-Oriented Dialogue for Evaluating Natural Language Generation. (arXiv:1706.09799v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Shikhar Sharma, Layla El Asri, Hannes Schulz, Jeremie Zumer

Automated metrics such as BLEU are widely used in the machine translation literature. They have also been used recently in the dialogue community for evaluating dialogue response generation. However, previous work in dialogue response generation has shown that these metrics do not correlate strongly with human judgment in the non task-oriented dialogue setting. Task-oriented dialogue responses are expressed on narrower domains and exhibit lower diversity. It is thus reasonable to think that these automated metrics would correlate well with human judgment in the task-oriented setting where the generation task consists of translating dialogue acts into a sentence. We conduct an empirical study to confirm whether this is the case. Our findings indicate that these automated metrics have stronger correlation with human judgments in the task-oriented setting compared to what has been observed in the non task-oriented setting. We also observe that these metrics correlate even better for datasets which provide multiple ground truth reference sentences. In addition, we show that some of the currently available corpora for task-oriented language generation can be solved with simple models and advocate for more challenging datasets.


          Robust Face Tracking using Multiple Appearance Models and Graph Relational Learning. (arXiv:1706.09806v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Tanushri Chakravorty, Guillaume-Alexandre Bilodeau, Eric Granger

This paper addresses the problem of appearance matching across different challenges while doing visual face tracking in real-world scenarios. In this paper, FaceTrack is proposed that utilizes multiple appearance models with its long-term and short-term appearance memory for efficient face tracking. It demonstrates robustness to deformation, in-plane and out-of-plane rotation, scale, distractors and background clutter. It capitalizes on the advantages of the tracking-by-detection, by using a face detector that tackles drastic scale appearance change of a face. The detector also helps to reinitialize FaceTrack during drift. A weighted score-level fusion strategy is proposed to obtain the face tracking output having the highest fusion score by generating candidates around possible face locations. The tracker showcases impressive performance when initiated automatically by outperforming many state-of-the-art trackers, except Struck by a very minute margin: 0.001 in precision and 0.017 in success respectively.


          Fundamental Limits and Tradeoffs in Autocatalytic Pathways. (arXiv:1706.09810v1 [cs.SY])   

Authors: Milad Siami, Nader Motee, Gentian Buzi, Bassam Bamieh, Mustafa Khammash, John C. Doyle

This paper develops some basic principles to study autocatalytic networks and exploit their structural properties in order to characterize their inherent fundamental limits and tradeoffs. In a dynamical system with autocatalytic structure, the system's output is necessary to catalyze its own production. We consider a simplified model of Glycolysis pathway as our motivating application. First, the properties of these class of pathways are investigated through a simplified two-state model, which is obtained by lumping all the intermediate reactions into a single intermediate reaction. Then, we generalize our results to autocatalytic pathways that are composed of a chain of enzymatically catalyzed intermediate reactions. We explicitly derive a hard limit on the minimum achievable $\mathcal L_2$-gain disturbance attenuation and a hard limit on its minimum required output energy. Finally, we show how these resulting hard limits lead to some fundamental tradeoffs between transient and steady-state behavior of the network and its net production.


          Generalization Error Bounds for Extreme Multi-class Classification. (arXiv:1706.09814v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Yunwen Lei, Urun Dogan, Ding-Xuan Zhou, Marius Kloft

Extreme multi-class classification is multi-class learning using an extremely large number of label classes. We show generalization error bounds with a mild dependency (up to logarithmic) on the number of classes, making them suitable for extreme classification. The bounds generally hold for empirical multi-class risk minimization algorithms using an arbitrary norm as regularizer. This setting comprises several prominent learning methods, including multinomial logistic regression, top-k multi-class SVM, and several classic multi-class SVMs. We show both data-dependent and data-independent bounds. Key to the data-dependent analysis is the introduction of the multi-class Gaussian complexity, which is able to preserve the coupling among classes. Furthermore, we show a data-independent bound that, choosing appropriate loss, can exhibit a tighter dependency on the number of classes than the data-dependent bound. We give a matching lower bound, showing that the result is tight, up to a constant factor. We apply the general results to several prominent multi-class learning machines, exhibiting a tighter dependency on the number of classes than the state of the art. For instance, for the multi-class SVM by Crammer and Singer (2002), we obtain a data-dependent bound with square root dependency (previously: linear) and a data-independent bound with logarithmic dependency (previously: square root).


          Cooperative Slotted ALOHA for Massive M2M Random Access Using Directional Antennas. (arXiv:1706.09817v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Aleksandar Mastilovic, Dejan Vukobratovic, Dusan Jakovetic, Dragana Bajovic

Slotted ALOHA (SA) algorithms with Successive Interference Cancellation (SIC) decoding have received significant attention lately due to their ability to dramatically increase the throughput of traditional SA. Motivated by increased density of cellular radio access networks due to the introduction of small cells, and dramatic increase of user density in Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications, SA algorithms with SIC operating cooperatively in multi base station (BS) scenario are recently considered. In this paper, we generalize our previous work on Slotted ALOHA with multiple-BS (SA-MBS) by considering users that use directional antennas. In particular, we focus on a simple randomized beamforming strategy where, for every packet transmission, a user orients its main beam in a randomly selected direction. We are interested in the total achievable system throughput for two decoding scenarios: i) non-cooperative scenario in which traditional SA operates at each BS independently, and ii) cooperative SA-MBS in which centralized SIC-based decoding is applied over all received user signals. For both scenarios, we provide upper system throughput limits and compare them against the simulation results. Finally, we discuss the system performance as a function of simple directional antenna model parameters applied in this paper.


          Structural Analysis and Optimal Design of Distributed System Throttlers. (arXiv:1706.09820v1 [cs.SY])   

Authors: Milad Siami, Joëlle Skaf

In this paper, we investigate the performance analysis and synthesis of distributed system throttlers (DST). A throttler is a mechanism that limits the flow rate of incoming metrics, e.g., byte per second, network bandwidth usage, capacity, traffic, etc. This can be used to protect a service's backend/clients from getting overloaded, or to reduce the effects of uncertainties in demand for shared services. We study performance deterioration of DSTs subject to demand uncertainty. We then consider network synthesis problems that aim to improve the performance of noisy DSTs via communication link modifications as well as server update cycle modifications.


          Towards Monocular Vision based Obstacle Avoidance through Deep Reinforcement Learning. (arXiv:1706.09829v1 [cs.RO])   

Authors: Linhai Xie, Sen Wang, Andrew Markham, Niki Trigoni

Obstacle avoidance is a fundamental requirement for autonomous robots which operate in, and interact with, the real world. When perception is limited to monocular vision avoiding collision becomes significantly more challenging due to the lack of 3D information. Conventional path planners for obstacle avoidance require tuning a number of parameters and do not have the ability to directly benefit from large datasets and continuous use. In this paper, a dueling architecture based deep double-Q network (D3QN) is proposed for obstacle avoidance, using only monocular RGB vision. Based on the dueling and double-Q mechanisms, D3QN can efficiently learn how to avoid obstacles in a simulator even with very noisy depth information predicted from RGB image. Extensive experiments show that D3QN enables twofold acceleration on learning compared with a normal deep Q network and the models trained solely in virtual environments can be directly transferred to real robots, generalizing well to various new environments with previously unseen dynamic objects.


          Linear Estimation of Treatment Effects in Demand Response: An Experimental Design Approach. (arXiv:1706.09835v1 [math.OC])   

Authors: Pan Li, Baosen Zhang

Demand response aims to stimulate electricity consumers to modify their loads at critical time periods. In this paper, we consider signals in demand response programs as a binary treatment to the customers and estimate the average treatment effect, which is the average change in consumption under the demand response signals. More specifically, we propose to estimate this effect by linear regression models and derive several estimators based on the different models. From both synthetic and real data, we show that including more information about the customers does not always improve estimation accuracy: the interaction between the side information and the demand response signal must be carefully modeled. In addition, we compare the traditional linear regression model with the modified covariate method which models the interaction between treatment effect and covariates. We analyze the variances of these estimators and discuss different cases where each respective estimator works the best. The purpose of these comparisons is not to claim the superiority of the different methods, rather we aim to provide practical guidance on the most suitable estimator to use under different settings. Our results are validated using data collected by Pecan Street and EnergyPlus.


          New Fairness Metrics for Recommendation that Embrace Differences. (arXiv:1706.09838v1 [cs.CY])   

Authors: Sirui Yao, Bert Huang

We study fairness in collaborative-filtering recommender systems, which are sensitive to discrimination that exists in historical data. Biased data can lead collaborative filtering methods to make unfair predictions against minority groups of users. We identify the insufficiency of existing fairness metrics and propose four new metrics that address different forms of unfairness. These fairness metrics can be optimized by adding fairness terms to the learning objective. Experiments on synthetic and real data show that our new metrics can better measure fairness than the baseline, and that the fairness objectives effectively help reduce unfairness.


          Runaway Feedback Loops in Predictive Policing. (arXiv:1706.09847v1 [cs.CY])   

Authors: Danielle Ensign, Sorelle A. Friedler, Scott Neville, Carlos Scheidegger, Suresh Venkatasubramanian

Predictive policing systems are increasingly used to determine how to allocate police across a city in order to best prevent crime. Observed crime data (arrest counts) are used to update the model, and the process is repeated. Such systems have been shown susceptible to runaway feedback loops, where police are repeatedly sent back to the same neighborhoods regardless of the true crime rate. In response, we develop a model of predictive policing that shows why this feedback loop occurs, show empirically that this model exhibits such problems, and demonstrate how to change the inputs to a predictive policing system (in a black-box manner) so the runaway feedback loop does not occur, allowing the true crime rate to be learned.


          Quantum computation with indefinite causal structures. (arXiv:1706.09854v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Mateus Araújo, Philippe Allard Guérin, Ämin Baumeler

One way to study the physical plausibility of closed timelike curves (CTCs) is to examine their computational power. This has been done for Deutschian CTCs (D-CTCs) and post-selection CTCs (P-CTCs), with the result that they allow for the efficient solution of problems in PSPACE and PP, respectively. Since these are extremely powerful complexity classes, which are not expected to be solvable in reality, this can be taken as evidence that these models for CTCs are pathological. This problem is closely related to the nonlinearity of this models, which also allows for example cloning quantum states, in the case of D-CTCs, or distinguishing non-orthogonal quantum states, in the case of P-CTCs. In contrast, the process matrix formalism allows one to model indefinite causal structures in a linear way, getting rid of these effects, and raising the possibility that its computational power is rather tame. In this paper we show that process matrices correspond to a linear particular case of P-CTCs, and therefore that its computational power is upperbounded by that of PP. We show, furthermore, a family of processes that can violate causal inequalities but nevertheless can be simulated by a causally ordered quantum circuit with only a constant overhead, showing that indefinite causality is not necessarily hard to simulate.


          Topology-Preserving Off-screen Visualization: Effects of Projection Strategy and Intrusion Adaption. (arXiv:1706.09855v1 [cs.HC])   

Authors: Dominik Jäckle, Johannes Fuchs, Harald Reiterer

With the increasing amount of data being visualized in large information spaces, methods providing data-driven context have become indispensable. Off-screen visualization techniques, therefore, have been extensively researched for their ability to overcome the inherent trade-off between overview and detail. The general idea is to project off-screen located objects back to the available screen real estate. Detached visual cues, such as halos or arrows, encode information on position and distance, but fall short showing the topology of off-screen objects. For that reason, state of the art techniques integrate visual cues into a dedicated border region. As yet, the dimensions of the navigated space are not reflected properly, which is why we propose to adapt the intrusion of the border pursuant to the position in space. Moreover, off-screen objects are projected to the border region using one out of two projection methods: Radial or Orthographic. We describe a controlled experiment to investigate the effect of the adaptive border intrusion to the topology as well as the users' intuition regarding the projection strategy. The results of our experiment suggest to use the orthographic projection strategy for unconnected point data in an adaptive border design. We further discuss the results including the given informal feedback of participants.


          Automatic Mapping of French Discourse Connectives to PDTB Discourse Relations. (arXiv:1706.09856v1 [cs.CL])   

Authors: Majid Laali, Leila Kosseim

In this paper, we present an approach to exploit phrase tables generated by statistical machine translation in order to map French discourse connectives to discourse relations. Using this approach, we created ConcoLeDisCo, a lexicon of French discourse connectives and their PDTB relations. When evaluated against LEXCONN, ConcoLeDisCo achieves a recall of 0.81 and an Average Precision of 0.68 for the Concession and Condition relations.


          What's Mine is Yours: Pretrained CNNs for Limited Training Sonar ATR. (arXiv:1706.09858v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: John McKay, Isaac Gerg, Vishal Monga, Raghu Raj

Finding mines in Sonar imagery is a significant problem with a great deal of relevance for seafaring military and commercial endeavors. Unfortunately, the lack of enormous Sonar image data sets has prevented automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms from some of the same advances seen in other computer vision fields. Namely, the boom in convolutional neural nets (CNNs) which have been able to achieve incredible results - even surpassing human actors - has not been an easily feasible route for many practitioners of Sonar ATR. We demonstrate the power of one avenue to incorporating CNNs into Sonar ATR: transfer learning. We first show how well a straightforward, flexible CNN feature-extraction strategy can be used to obtain impressive if not state-of-the-art results. Secondly, we propose a way to utilize the powerful transfer learning approach towards multiple instance target detection and identification within a provided synthetic aperture Sonar data set.


          Complex Networks Analysis for Software Architecture: an Hibernate Call Graph Study. (arXiv:1706.09859v1 [cs.SI])   

Authors: Daniel Henrique Mourão Falci, Orlando Abreu Gomes, Fernando Silva Parreiras

Recent advancements in complex network analysis are encouraging and may provide useful insights when applied in software engineering domain, revealing properties and structures that cannot be captured by traditional metrics. In this paper, we analyzed the topological properties of Hibernate library, a well-known Java-based software through the extraction of its static call graph. The results reveal a complex network with small-world and scale-free characteristics while displaying a strong propensity on forming communities.


          Rational Trust Modeling. (arXiv:1706.09861v1 [cs.CR])   

Authors: Mehrdad Nojoumian

Trust models are widely used in various computer science disciplines. The main purpose of a trust model is to continuously measure trustworthiness of a set of entities based on their behaviors. In this article, the novel notion of "rational trust modeling" is introduced by bridging trust management and game theory. Note that trust models/reputation systems have been used in game theory (e.g., repeated games) for a long time, however, game theory has not been utilized in the process of trust model construction; this is where the novelty of our approach comes from. In our proposed setting, the designer of a trust model assumes that the players who intend to utilize the model are rational/selfish, i.e., they decide to become trustworthy or untrustworthy based on the utility that they can gain. In other words, the players are incentivized (or penalized) by the model itself to act properly. The problem of trust management can be then approached by game theoretical analyses and solution concepts such as Nash equilibrium. Although rationality might be built-in in some existing trust models, we intend to formalize the notion of rational trust modeling from the designer's perspective. This approach will result in two fascinating outcomes. First of all, the designer of a trust model can incentivise trustworthiness in the first place by incorporating proper parameters into the trust function, which can be later utilized among selfish players in strategic trust-based interactions (e.g., e-commerce scenarios). Furthermore, using a rational trust model, we can prevent many well-known attacks on trust models. These two prominent properties also help us to predict behavior of the players in subsequent steps by game theoretical analyses.


          Generalising Random Forest Parameter Optimisation to Include Stability and Cost. (arXiv:1706.09865v1 [stat.ML])   

Authors: C.H. Bryan Liu, Benjamin Paul Chamberlain, Duncan A. Little, Angelo Cardoso

Random forests are among the most popular classification and regression methods used in industrial applications. To be effective, the parameters of random forests must be carefully tuned. This is usually done by choosing values that minimize the prediction error on a held out dataset. We argue that error reduction is only one of several metrics that must be considered when optimizing random forest parameters for commercial applications. We propose a novel metric that captures the stability of random forests predictions, which we argue is key for scenarios that require successive predictions. We motivate the need for multi-criteria optimization by showing that in practical applications, simply choosing the parameters that lead to the lowest error can introduce unnecessary costs and produce predictions that are not stable across independent runs. To optimize this multi-criteria trade-off, we present a new framework that efficiently finds a principled balance between these three considerations using Bayesian optimisation. The pitfalls of optimising forest parameters purely for error reduction are demonstrated using two publicly available real world datasets. We show that our framework leads to parameter settings that are markedly different from the values discovered by error reduction metrics.


          Approximate Maximin Shares for Groups of Agents. (arXiv:1706.09869v1 [cs.GT])   

Authors: Warut Suksompong

We investigate the problem of fairly allocating indivisible goods among interested agents using the concept of maximin share. Procaccia and Wang showed that while an allocation that gives every agent at least her maximin share does not necessarily exist, one that gives every agent at least $2/3$ of her share always does. In this paper, we consider the more general setting where we allocate the goods to \emph{groups} of agents. The agents in each group share the same set of goods even though they may have conflicting preferences. For two groups, we characterize the cardinality of the groups for which a constant factor approximation of the maximin share is possible regardless of the number of goods. We also show settings where an approximation is possible or impossible when there are several groups.


          Scale-Aware Face Detection. (arXiv:1706.09876v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Zekun Hao, Yu Liu, Hongwei Qin, Junjie Yan, Xiu Li, Xiaolin Hu

Convolutional neural network (CNN) based face detectors are inefficient in handling faces of diverse scales. They rely on either fitting a large single model to faces across a large scale range or multi-scale testing. Both are computationally expensive. We propose Scale-aware Face Detector (SAFD) to handle scale explicitly using CNN, and achieve better performance with less computation cost. Prior to detection, an efficient CNN predicts the scale distribution histogram of the faces. Then the scale histogram guides the zoom-in and zoom-out of the image. Since the faces will be approximately in uniform scale after zoom, they can be detected accurately even with much smaller CNN. Actually, more than 99% of the faces in AFW can be covered with less than two zooms per image. Extensive experiments on FDDB, MALF and AFW show advantages of SAFD.


          A universal completion of the ZX-calculus. (arXiv:1706.09877v1 [quant-ph])   

Authors: Kang Feng Ng, Quanlong Wang

In this paper, we give a universal completion of the ZX-calculus for the whole of pure qubit quantum mechanics. This proof is based on the completeness of another graphical language: the ZW-calculus, with direct translations between these two graphical systems.


          Towards Understanding the Dynamics of Generative Adversarial Networks. (arXiv:1706.09884v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Jerry Li, Aleksander Madry, John Peebles, Ludwig Schmidt

Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have recently been proposed as a promising avenue towards learning generative models with deep neural networks. While GANs have demonstrated state-of-the-art performance on multiple vision tasks, their learning dynamics are not yet well understood, both in theory and in practice. To address this issue, we take a first step towards a rigorous study of GAN dynamics. We propose a simple model that exhibits several of the common problematic convergence behaviors (e.g., vanishing gradient, mode collapse, diverging or oscillatory behavior) and still allows us to establish the first convergence bounds for parametric GAN dynamics. We find an interesting dichotomy: a GAN with an optimal discriminator provably converges, while a first order approximation of the discriminator leads to unstable GAN dynamics and mode collapse. Our model and analysis point to a specific challenge in practical GAN training that we call discriminator collapse.


          Optimal Control for Multi-Mode Systems with Discrete Costs. (arXiv:1706.09886v1 [cs.LO])   

Authors: Mahmoud A. A. Mousa, Sven Schewe, Dominik Wojtczak

This paper studies optimal time-bounded control in multi-mode systems with discrete costs. Multi-mode systems are an important subclass of linear hybrid systems, in which there are no guards on transitions and all invariants are global. Each state has a continuous cost attached to it, which is linear in the sojourn time, while a discrete cost is attached to each transition taken. We show that an optimal control for this model can be computed in NEXPTIME and approximated in PSPACE. We also show that the one-dimensional case is simpler: although the problem is NP-complete (and in LOGSPACE for an infinite time horizon), we develop an FPTAS for finding an approximate solution.


          Automatic Face Image Quality Prediction. (arXiv:1706.09887v1 [cs.CV])   

Authors: Lacey Best-Rowden, Anil K. Jain

Face image quality can be defined as a measure of the utility of a face image to automatic face recognition. In this work, we propose (and compare) two methods for automatic face image quality based on target face quality values from (i) human assessments of face image quality (matcher-independent), and (ii) quality values computed from similarity scores (matcher-dependent). A support vector regression model trained on face features extracted using a deep convolutional neural network (ConvNet) is used to predict the quality of a face image. The proposed methods are evaluated on two unconstrained face image databases, LFW and IJB-A, which both contain facial variations with multiple quality factors. Evaluation of the proposed automatic face image quality measures shows we are able to reduce the FNMR at 1% FMR by at least 13% for two face matchers (a COTS matcher and a ConvNet matcher) by using the proposed face quality to select subsets of face images and video frames for matching templates (i.e., multiple faces per subject) in the IJB-A protocol. To our knowledge, this is the first work to utilize human assessments of face image quality in designing a predictor of unconstrained face quality that is shown to be effective in cross-database evaluation.


          Fast Separable Non-Local Means. (arXiv:1407.2343v2 [cs.CV] UPDATED)   

Authors: S. Ghosh, K. N. Chaudhury

We propose a simple and fast algorithm called PatchLift for computing distances between patches (contiguous block of samples) extracted from a given one-dimensional signal. PatchLift is based on the observation that the patch distances can be efficiently computed from a matrix that is derived from the one-dimensional signal using lifting; importantly, the number of operations required to compute the patch distances using this approach does not scale with the patch length. We next demonstrate how PatchLift can be used for patch-based denoising of images corrupted with Gaussian noise. In particular, we propose a separable formulation of the classical Non-Local Means (NLM) algorithm that can be implemented using PatchLift. We demonstrate that the PatchLift-based implementation of separable NLM is few orders faster than standard NLM, and is competitive with existing fast implementations of NLM. Moreover, its denoising performance is shown to be consistently superior to that of NLM and some of its variants, both in terms of PSNR/SSIM and visual quality.


          Cyclic Codes over the Matrix Ring $M_2(F_p)$ and Their Isometric Images over $F_{p^2}+uF_{p^2}$. (arXiv:1409.7228v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Dixie F. Falcunit Jr., Virgilio P. Sison

Let $F_p$ be the prime field with $p$ elements. We derive the homogeneous weight on the Frobenius matrix ring $M_2(F_p)$ in terms of the generating character. We also give a generalization of the Lee weight on the finite chain ring $F_{p^2}+uF_{p^2}$ where $u^2=0$. A non-commutative ring, denoted by $\mathcal{F}_{p^2}+\mathbf{v}_p \mathcal{F}_{p^2}$, $\mathbf{v}_p$ an involution in $M_2(F_p)$, that is isomorphic to $M_2(F_p)$ and is a left $F_{p^2}$-vector space, is constructed through a unital embedding $\tau$ from $F_{p^2}$ to $M_2(F_p)$. The elements of $\mathcal{F}_{p^2}$ come from $M_2(F_p)$ such that $\tau(F_{p^2})=\mathcal{F}_{p^2}$. The irreducible polynomial $f(x)=x^2+x+(p-1) \in F_p[x]$ required in $\tau$ restricts our study of cyclic codes over $M_2(F_p)$ endowed with the Bachoc weight to the case $p\equiv$ $2$ or $3$ mod $5$. The images of these codes via a left $F_p$-module isometry are additive cyclic codes over $F_{p^2}+uF_{p^2}$ endowed with the Lee weight. New examples of such codes are given.


          Unifying Two Views on Multiple Mean-Payoff Objectives in Markov Decision Processes. (arXiv:1502.00611v4 [cs.LO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Krishnendu Chatterjee, Zuzana Křetínská, Jan Křetínský

We consider Markov decision processes (MDPs) with multiple limit-average (or mean-payoff) objectives. There exist two different views: (i) the expectation semantics, where the goal is to optimize the expected mean-payoff objective, and (ii) the satisfaction semantics, where the goal is to maximize the probability of runs such that the mean-payoff value stays above a given vector. We consider optimization with respect to both objectives at once, thus unifying the existing semantics. Precisely, the goal is to optimize the expectation while ensuring the satisfaction constraint. Our problem captures the notion of optimization with respect to strategies that are risk-averse (i.e., ensure certain probabilistic guarantee). Our main results are as follows: First, we present algorithms for the decision problems which are always polynomial in the size of the MDP. We also show that an approximation of the Pareto-curve can be computed in time polynomial in the size of the MDP, and the approximation factor, but exponential in the number of dimensions. Second, we present a complete characterization of the strategy complexity (in terms of memory bounds and randomization) required to solve our problem.


          An adaptive algorithm for the Euclidean Steiner tree problem in d-space. (arXiv:1511.03407v3 [cs.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Aymeric Grodet, Takuya Tsuchiya

We describe a technique to improve Smith's branch-and-bound algorithm for the Euclidean Steiner tree problem in $\mathbb{R}^d$. The algorithm relies on the enumeration and optimization of full Steiner topologies for corresponding subsets of regular points. We handle the case of two Steiner points colliding during the optimization process - that is when they come to the same position - to dynamically change the exploration of the branch-and-bound tree. To do so, we present a way to reorganize a topology to another by exchanging neighbors of adjacent Steiner points. This enables reaching better minima faster, thus allowing the branch-and-bound to be further pruned. We also correct a mistake in Smith's program by computing a lower bound for a Steiner tree with a specified topology and using it as a pruning technique prior to optimization. Because Steiner points lie in the plane formed by their three neighbors, we can build planar equilateral points and use them to compute the lower bound, even in dimensions higher than two.


          Longest Gapped Repeats and Palindromes. (arXiv:1511.07180v3 [cs.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Marius Dumitran, Paweł Gawrychowski, Florin Manea

A gapped repeat (respectively, palindrome) occurring in a word $w$ is a factor $uvu$ (respectively, $u^Rvu$) of $w$. In such a repeat (palindrome) $u$ is called the arm of the repeat (respectively, palindrome), while $v$ is called the gap. We show how to compute efficiently, for every position $i$ of the word $w$, the longest gapped repeat and palindrome occurring at that position, provided that the length of the gap is subject to various types of restrictions. That is, that for each position $i$ we compute the longest prefix $u$ of $w[i..n]$ such that $uv$ (respectively, $u^Rv$) is a suffix of $w[1..i-1]$ (defining thus a gapped repeat $uvu$ -- respectively, palindrome $u^Rvu$), and the length of $v$ is subject to the aforementioned restrictions.


          Set-membership improved normalized subband adaptive filter algorithms for acoustic echo cancellation. (arXiv:1512.05031v3 [cs.SY] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yi Yu, Haiquan Zhao, Badong Chen

In order to improve the performances of recently-presented improved normalized subband adaptive filter (INSAF) and proportionate INSAF algorithms for highly noisy system, this paper proposes their set-membership versions by exploiting the theory of set-membership filtering. Apart from obtaining smaller steady-state error, the proposed algorithms significantly reduce the overall computational complexity. In addition, to further improve the steady-state performance for the algorithms, their smooth variants are developed by using the smoothed absolute subband output errors to update the step sizes. Simulation results in the context of acoustic echo cancellation have demonstrated the superiority of the proposed algorithms.


          Change-Sensitive Algorithms for Maintaining Maximal Cliques in a Dynamic Graph. (arXiv:1601.06311v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Apurba Das, Michael Svendsen, Srikanta Tirthapura

We consider the maintenance of the set of all maximal cliques in a dynamic graph that is changing through the addition or deletion of edges. We present nearly tight bounds on the magnitude of change in the set of maximal cliques, as well as the first change-sensitive algorithms for clique maintenance, whose runtime is proportional to the magnitude of the change in the set of maximal cliques. We present experimental results showing that these algorithms are efficient in practice.


          Fair Simulation for Nondeterministic and Probabilistic Buechi Automata: a Coalgebraic Perspective. (arXiv:1606.04680v3 [cs.LO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Natsuki Urabe, Ichiro Hasuo

Notions of \emph{simulation}, among other uses, provide a computationally tractable and sound (but not necessarily complete) proof method for language inclusion. They have been comprehensively studied by Lynch and Vaandrager for nondeterministic and timed systems; for \emph{B\"{u}chi} automata the notion of \emph{fair simulation} has been introduced by Henzinger, Kupferman and Rajamani. We contribute to a generalization of fair simulation in two different directions: one for nondeterministic \emph{tree} automata previously studied by Bomhard; and the other for \emph{probabilistic} word automata with finite state spaces, both under the B\"{u}chi acceptance condition. The former nondeterministic definition is formulated in terms of systems of fixed-point equations, hence is readily translated to parity games and is then amenable to Jurdzi\'{n}ski's algorithm; the latter probabilistic definition bears a strong ranking-function flavor. These two different-looking definitions are derived from one source, namely our \emph{coalgebraic} modeling of B\"{u}chi automata. Based on these coalgebraic observations, we also prove their soundness: a simulation indeed witnesses language inclusion.


          Model-Free Trajectory Optimization with Monotonic Improvement. (arXiv:1606.09197v3 [cs.LG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Riad Akrour, Abbas Abdolmaleki, Hany Abdulsamad, Jan Peters, Gerhard Neumann

Many of the recent trajectory optimization algorithms alternate between linear approximation of the system dynamics around the mean trajectory and conservative policy update. One way of constraining the policy change is by bounding the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence between successive policies. These approaches already demonstrated great experimental success in challenging problems such as end-to-end control of physical systems. However, these approaches lack any improvement guarantee as the linear approximation of the system dynamics can introduce a bias in the policy update and prevent convergence to the optimal policy. In this article, we propose a new model-free trajectory optimization algorithm with guaranteed monotonic improvement. The algorithm backpropagates a local, quadratic and time-dependent Q-Function learned from trajectory data instead of a model of the system dynamics. Our policy update ensures exact KL-constraint satisfaction without simplifying assumptions on the system dynamics. We experimentally demonstrate on highly non-linear control tasks the improvement in performance of our algorithm in comparison to approaches linearizing the system dynamics. In order to show the monotonic improvement of our algorithm, we additionally conduct a theoretical analysis of our policy update scheme to derive a lower bound of the change in policy return between successive iterations.


          Asymptotic Comparison of ML and MAP Detectors for Multidimensional Constellations. (arXiv:1607.01818v3 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Alex Alvarado, Erik Agrell, Fredrik Brännström

A classical problem in digital communications is to evaluate the symbol error probability (SEP) and bit error probability (BEP) of a multidimensional constellation over an additive white Gaussian noise channel. In this paper, we revisit this problem for nonequally likely symbols and study the asymptotic behavior of the optimal maximum a posteriori (MAP) detector. Exact closed-form asymptotic expressions for SEP and BEP for arbitrary constellations and input distributions are presented. The well-known union bound is proven to be asymptotically tight under general conditions. The performance of the practically relevant maximum likelihood (ML) detector is also analyzed. Although the decision regions with MAP detection converge to the ML regions at high signal-to-noise ratios, the ratio between the MAP and ML detector in terms of both SEP and BEP approach a constant, which depends on the constellation and a priori probabilities. Necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic equivalence between the MAP and ML detectors are also presented.


          Temporal Correlation of Interference and Outage in Mobile Networks over One-Dimensional Finite Regions. (arXiv:1608.02884v2 [cs.NI] UPDATED)   

Authors: Konstantinos Koufos, Carl P. Dettmann

In practice, wireless networks are deployed over finite domains, the level of mobility is different at different locations, and user mobility is correlated over time. All these features have an impact on the temporal properties of interference which is often neglected. In this paper, we show how to incorporate correlated user mobility into the interference and outage correlation models. We use the random waypoint mobility model over a bounded one-dimensional domain as an example model inducing correlation, and we calculate its displacement law at different locations. Based on that, we illustrate that the temporal correlations of interference and outage are location-dependent, being lower close to the centre of the domain, where the level of mobility is higher than near the boundary. Close to the boundary, more time is also needed to see uncorrelated interference. Our findings suggest that an accurate description of the mobility pattern is important, because it leads to more accurate understanding/modeling of interference and receiver performance.


          Identifiability of linear dynamic networks. (arXiv:1609.00864v3 [cs.SY] UPDATED)   

Authors: Harm H.M. Weerts, Paul M.J. Van den Hof, Arne G. Dankers

Dynamic networks are structured interconnections of dynamical systems (modules) driven by external excitation and disturbance signals. In order to identify their dynamical properties and/or their topology consistently from measured data, we need to make sure that the network model set is identifiable. We introduce the notion of network identifiability, as a property of a parameterized model set, that ensures that different network models can be distinguished from each other when performing identification on the basis of measured data. Different from the classical notion of (parameter) identifiability, we focus on the distinction between network models in terms of their transfer functions. For a given structured model set with a pre-chosen topology, identifiability typically requires conditions on the presence and location of excitation signals, and on presence, location and correlation of disturbance signals. Because in a dynamic network, disturbances cannot always be considered to be of full-rank, the reduced-rank situation is also covered, meaning that the number of driving white noise processes can be strictly less than the number of disturbance variables. This includes the situation of having noise-free nodes.


          On the Preciseness of Subtyping in Session Types. (arXiv:1610.00328v3 [cs.LO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Tzu-chun Chen, Mariangiola Dezani-Ciancaglini, Alceste Scalas, Nobuko Yoshida

Subtyping in concurrency has been extensively studied since early 1990s as one of the most interesting issues in type theory. The correctness of subtyping relations has been usually provided as the soundness for type safety. The converse direction, the completeness, has been largely ignored in spite of its usefulness to define the largest subtyping relation ensuring type safety. This paper formalises preciseness (i.e. both soundness and completeness) of subtyping for mobile processes and studies it for the synchronous and the asynchronous session calculi. We first prove that the well-known session subtyping, the branching-selection subtyping, is sound and complete for the synchronous calculus. Next we show that in the asynchronous calculus, this subtyping is incomplete for type-safety: that is, there exist session types T and S such that

T can safely be considered as a subtype of S, but T < S is not derivable by the subtyping. We then propose an asynchronous subtyping system which is sound and complete for the asynchronous calculus. The method gives a general guidance to design rigorous channel-based subtypings respecting desired safety properties. Both the synchronous and the asynchronous calculus are first considered with lin ear channels only, and then they are extended with session initialisations and c ommunications of expressions (including shared channels).


          Differential Inequalities in Multi-Agent Coordination and Opinion Dynamics Modeling. (arXiv:1610.03373v2 [cs.SY] UPDATED)   

Authors: Anton V. Proskurnikov, Ming Cao

Distributed algorithms of multi-agent coordination have attracted substantial attention from the research community; the simplest and most thoroughly studied of them are consensus protocols in the form of differential or difference equations over general time-varying weighted graphs. These graphs are usually characterized algebraically by their associated Laplacian matrices. Network algorithms with similar algebraic graph theoretic structures, called being of Laplacian-type in this paper, also arise in other related multi-agent control problems, such as aggregation and containment control, target surrounding, distributed optimization and modeling of opinion evolution in social groups. In spite of their similarities, each of such algorithms has often been studied using separate mathematical techniques. In this paper, a novel approach is offered, allowing a unified and elegant way to examine many Laplacian-type algorithms for multi-agent coordination. This approach is based on the analysis of some differential or difference inequalities that have to be satisfied by the some "outputs" of the agents (e.g. the distances to the desired set in aggregation problems). Although such inequalities may have many unbounded solutions, under natural graphic connectivity conditions all their bounded solutions converge (and even reach consensus), entailing the convergence of the corresponding distributed algorithms. In the theory of differential equations the absence of bounded non-convergent solutions is referred to as the equation's dichotomy. In this paper, we establish the dichotomy criteria of Laplacian-type differential and difference inequalities and show that these criteria enable one to extend a number of recent results, concerned with Laplacian-type algorithms for multi-agent coordination and modeling opinion formation in social groups.


          Particle Swarm Optimization for Generating Interpretable Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Policies. (arXiv:1610.05984v4 [cs.NE] UPDATED)   

Authors: Daniel Hein, Alexander Hentschel, Thomas Runkler, Steffen Udluft

Fuzzy controllers are efficient and interpretable system controllers for continuous state and action spaces. To date, such controllers have been constructed manually or trained automatically either using expert-generated problem-specific cost functions or incorporating detailed knowledge about the optimal control strategy. Both requirements for automatic training processes are not found in most real-world reinforcement learning (RL) problems. In such applications, online learning is often prohibited for safety reasons because online learning requires exploration of the problem's dynamics during policy training. We introduce a fuzzy particle swarm reinforcement learning (FPSRL) approach that can construct fuzzy RL policies solely by training parameters on world models that simulate real system dynamics. These world models are created by employing an autonomous machine learning technique that uses previously generated transition samples of a real system. To the best of our knowledge, this approach is the first to relate self-organizing fuzzy controllers to model-based batch RL. Therefore, FPSRL is intended to solve problems in domains where online learning is prohibited, system dynamics are relatively easy to model from previously generated default policy transition samples, and it is expected that a relatively easily interpretable control policy exists. The efficiency of the proposed approach with problems from such domains is demonstrated using three standard RL benchmarks, i.e., mountain car, cart-pole balancing, and cart-pole swing-up. Our experimental results demonstrate high-performing, interpretable fuzzy policies.


          Regularized Optimal Transport and the Rot Mover's Distance. (arXiv:1610.06447v2 [stat.ML] UPDATED)   

Authors: Arnaud Dessein, Nicolas Papadakis, Jean-Luc Rouas

This paper presents a unified framework for smooth convex regularization of discrete optimal transport problems. In this context, the regularized optimal transport turns out to be equivalent to a matrix nearness problem with respect to Bregman divergences. Our framework thus naturally generalizes a previously proposed regularization based on the Boltzmann-Shannon entropy related to the Kullback-Leibler divergence, and solved with the Sinkhorn-Knopp algorithm. We call the regularized optimal transport distance the rot mover's distance in reference to the classical earth mover's distance. We develop two generic schemes that we respectively call the alternate scaling algorithm and the non-negative alternate scaling algorithm, to compute efficiently the regularized optimal plans depending on whether the domain of the regularizer lies within the non-negative orthant or not. These schemes are based on Dykstra's algorithm with alternate Bregman projections, and further exploit the Newton-Raphson method when applied to separable divergences. We enhance the separable case with a sparse extension to deal with high data dimensions. We also instantiate our proposed framework and discuss the inherent specificities for well-known regularizers and statistical divergences in the machine learning and information geometry communities. Finally, we demonstrate the merits of our methods with experiments using synthetic data to illustrate the effect of different regularizers and penalties on the solutions, as well as real-world data for a pattern recognition application to audio scene classification.


          Optimal Mechanisms for Selling Two Items to a Single Buyer Having Uniformly Distributed Valuations. (arXiv:1610.06718v3 [cs.GT] UPDATED)   

Authors: D. Thirumulanathan, Rajesh Sundaresan, Y Narahari

We consider the design of an optimal mechanism for a seller selling two items to a single buyer so that the expected revenue to the seller is maximized. The buyer's valuation of the two items is assumed to be the uniform distribution over an arbitrary rectangle $[c_1,c_1+b_1]\times[c_2,c_2+b_2]$ in the positive quadrant. The solution to the case when $(c_1,c_2)=(0,0)$ was already known. We provide an explicit solution for arbitrary nonnegative values of $(c_1,c_2,b_1,b_2)$. We prove that the optimal mechanism is to sell the two items according to one of eight simple menus. The menus indicate that the items must be sold individually for certain values of $(c_1,c_2)$, the items must be bundled for certain other values, and the auction is an interplay of individual sale and a bundled sale for the remaining values of $(c_1,c_2)$. The special case of uniform distributions that we solve may provide insights on optimal menus under more general settings. We also prove that the solution is deterministic when either $c_1$ or $c_2$ is beyond a threshold. Finally, we conjecture that our methodology can be extended to a wider class of distributions. We also provide some preliminary results to support the conjecture.


          Fair Algorithms for Infinite and Contextual Bandits. (arXiv:1610.09559v4 [cs.LG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Matthew Joseph, Michael Kearns, Jamie Morgenstern, Seth Neel, Aaron Roth

We study fairness in linear bandit problems. Starting from the notion of meritocratic fairness introduced in Joseph et al. [2016], we carry out a more refined analysis of a more general problem, achieving better performance guarantees with fewer modelling assumptions on the number and structure of available choices as well as the number selected. We also analyze the previously-unstudied question of fairness in infinite linear bandit problems, obtaining instance-dependent regret upper bounds as well as lower bounds demonstrating that this instance-dependence is necessary. The result is a framework for meritocratic fairness in an online linear setting that is substantially more powerful, general, and realistic than the current state of the art.


          Node Embedding via Word Embedding for Network Community Discovery. (arXiv:1611.03028v3 [cs.SI] UPDATED)   

Authors: Weicong Ding, Christy Lin, Prakash Ishwar

Neural node embeddings have recently emerged as a powerful representation for supervised learning tasks involving graph-structured data. We leverage this recent advance to develop a novel algorithm for unsupervised community discovery in graphs. Through extensive experimental studies on simulated and real-world data, we demonstrate that the proposed approach consistently improves over the current state-of-the-art. Specifically, our approach empirically attains the information-theoretic limits for community recovery under the benchmark Stochastic Block Models for graph generation and exhibits better stability and accuracy over both Spectral Clustering and Acyclic Belief Propagation in the community recovery limits.


          Towards Information Privacy for the Internet of Things. (arXiv:1611.04254v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Meng Sun, Wee Peng Tay, Xin He

In an Internet of Things network, multiple sensors send information to a fusion center for it to infer a public hypothesis of interest. However, the same sensor information may be used by the fusion center to make inferences of a private nature that the sensors wish to protect. To model this, we adopt a decentralized hypothesis testing framework with binary public and private hypotheses. Each sensor makes a private observation and utilizes a local sensor decision rule or privacy mapping to summarize that observation independently of the other sensors. The local decision made by a sensor is then sent to the fusion center. Without assuming knowledge of the joint distribution of the sensor observations and hypotheses, we adopt a nonparametric learning approach to design local privacy mappings. We introduce the concept of an empirical normalized risk, which provides a theoretical guarantee for the network to achieve information privacy for the private hypothesis with high probability when the number of training samples is large. We develop iterative optimization algorithms to determine an appropriate privacy threshold and the best sensor privacy mappings, and show that they converge. Finally, we extend our approach to the case of a private multiple hypothesis. Numerical results on both synthetic and real data sets suggest that our proposed approach yields low error rates for inferring the public hypothesis, but high error rates for detecting the private hypothesis.


          A note on the function approximation error bound for risk-sensitive reinforcement learning. (arXiv:1612.07562v5 [cs.LG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Prasenjit Karmakar, Shalabh Bhatnagar

In this paper we obtain several error bounds of function approximation for the policy evaluation algorithm proposed by Basu et al. when the aim is to find the risk-sensitive cost represented using exponential utility. Additionally, we derive sufficient conditions under which one is better than the other. We also give examples where all our bounds achieve the "actual error" whereas the earlier bound given by Basu et al. is much weaker in comparison.


          Fast Reconstruction of High-qubit Quantum States via Low Rate Measurements. (arXiv:1701.03695v6 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: K. Li, J. Zhang, S. Cong

Due to the exponential complexity of the resources required by quantum state tomography (QST), people are interested in approaches towards identifying quantum states which require less effort and time. In this paper, we provide a tailored and efficient method for reconstructing mixed quantum states up to $12$ (or even more) qubits from an incomplete set of observables subject to noises. Our method is applicable to any pure or nearly pure state $\rho$, and can be extended to many states of interest in quantum information processing, such as multi-particle entangled $W$ state, GHZ state and cluster states that are matrix product operators of low dimensions. The method applies the quantum density matrix constraints to a quantum compressive sensing optimization problem, and exploits a modified Quantum Alternating Direction Multiplier Method (Quantum-ADMM) to accelerate the convergence. Our algorithm takes $8,35$ and $226$ seconds respectively to reconstruct superposition state density matrices of $10,11,12$ qubits with acceptable fidelity, using less than $1 \%$ of measurements of expectation. To our knowledge it is the fastest realization that people can achieve using a normal desktop. We further discuss applications of this method using experimental data of mixed states obtained in an ion trap experiment of up to $8$ qubits.


          Proving Linearizability Using Partial Orders (Extended Version). (arXiv:1701.05463v3 [cs.PL] UPDATED)   

Authors: Artem Khyzha, Mike Dodds, Alexey Gotsman, Matthew Parkinson

Linearizability is the commonly accepted notion of correctness for concurrent data structures. It requires that any execution of the data structure is justified by a linearization --- a linear order on operations satisfying the data structure's sequential specification. Proving linearizability is often challenging because an operation's position in the linearization order may depend on future operations. This makes it very difficult to incrementally construct the linearization in a proof.

We propose a new proof method that can handle data structures with such future-dependent linearizations. Our key idea is to incrementally construct not a single linear order of operations, but a partial order that describes multiple linearizations satisfying the sequential specification. This allows decisions about the ordering of operations to be delayed, mirroring the behaviour of data structure implementations. We formalise our method as a program logic based on rely-guarantee reasoning, and demonstrate its effectiveness by verifying several challenging data structures: the Herlihy-Wing queue, the TS queue and the Optimistic set.


          Autotuning GPU Kernels via Static and Predictive Analysis. (arXiv:1701.08547v3 [cs.DC] UPDATED)   

Authors: Robert V. Lim, Boyana Norris, Allen D. Malony

Optimizing the performance of GPU kernels is challenging for both human programmers and code generators. For example, CUDA programmers must set thread and block parameters for a kernel, but might not have the intuition to make a good choice. Similarly, compilers can generate working code, but may miss tuning opportunities by not targeting GPU models or performing code transformations. Although empirical autotuning addresses some of these challenges, it requires extensive experimentation and search for optimal code variants. This research presents an approach for tuning CUDA kernels based on static analysis that considers fine-grained code structure and the specific GPU architecture features. Notably, our approach does not require any program runs in order to discover near-optimal parameter settings. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach in enabling code autotuners such as Orio to produce competitive code variants comparable with empirical-based methods, without the high cost of experiments.


          Joint Pushing and Caching for Bandwidth Utilization Maximization in Wireless Networks. (arXiv:1702.01840v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yaping Sun, Ying Cui, Hui Liu

Joint pushing and caching is recognized as an efficient remedy to the problem of spectrum scarcity incurred by tremendous mobile data traffic. In this paper, by exploiting storage resources at end users and predictability of user demand processes, we design the optimal joint pushing and caching policy to maximize bandwidth utilization, which is of fundamental importance to mobile telecom carriers. In particular, we formulate the stochastic optimization problem as an infinite horizon average cost Markov Decision Process (MDP), for which there generally exist only numerical solutions without many insights. By structural analysis, we show how the optimal policy achieves a balance between the current transmission cost and the future average transmission cost. In addition, we show that the optimal average transmission cost decreases with the cache size, revealing a tradeoff between the cache size and the bandwidth utilization. Then, due to the fact that obtaining a numerical optimal solution suffers the curse of dimensionality and implementing it requires a centralized controller and global system information, we develop a decentralized policy with polynomial complexity w.r.t. the numbers of users and files as well as cache size, by a linear approximation of the value function and optimization relaxation techniques. Next, we propose an online decentralized algorithm to implement the proposed low-complexity decentralized policy using the technique of Q-learning, when priori knowledge of user demand processes is not available. Finally, using numerical results, we demonstrate the advantage of the proposed solutions over some existing designs. The results in this paper offer useful guidelines for designing practical cache-enabled content-centric wireless networks.


          An Analysis of Ability in Deep Neural Networks. (arXiv:1702.04811v2 [cs.CL] UPDATED)   

Authors: John P. Lalor, Hao Wu, Tsendsuren Munkhdalai, Hong Yu

Deep neural networks (DNNs) have made significant progress in a number of Machine Learning applications. However without a consistent set of evaluation tasks, interpreting performance across test datasets is impossible. In most previous work, characteristics of individual data points are not considered during evaluation, and each data point is treated equally. Using Item Response Theory (IRT) from psychometrics it is possible to model characteristics of specific data points that then inform an estimate of model ability as compared to a population of humans. We report the results of several experiments to determine how different Deep Neural Network (DNN) models perform under different training circumstances with respect to ability. As DNNs train on larger datasets, performance begins to look like human performance under the assumptions of IRT models. That is, easy questions start to have a higher probability of being answered correctly than harder questions. We also report the results of additional analyses regarding model robustness to noise and performance as a function of training set size that further inform our main conclusion


          A Random Matrix Approach to Neural Networks. (arXiv:1702.05419v2 [math.PR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Cosme Louart, Zhenyu Liao, Romain Couillet

This article studies the Gram random matrix model $G=\frac1T\Sigma^{\rm T}\Sigma$, $\Sigma=\sigma(WX)$, classically found in the analysis of random feature maps and random neural networks, where $X=[x_1,\ldots,x_T]\in{\mathbb R}^{p\times T}$ is a (data) matrix of bounded norm, $W\in{\mathbb R}^{n\times p}$ is a matrix of independent zero-mean unit variance entries, and $\sigma:{\mathbb R}\to{\mathbb R}$ is a Lipschitz continuous (activation) function --- $\sigma(WX)$ being understood entry-wise. By means of a key concentration of measure lemma arising from non-asymptotic random matrix arguments, we prove that, as $n,p,T$ grow large at the same rate, the resolvent $Q=(G+\gamma I_T)^{-1}$, for $\gamma>0$, has a similar behavior as that met in sample covariance matrix models, involving notably the moment $\Phi=\frac{T}n{\mathbb E}[G]$, which provides in passing a deterministic equivalent for the empirical spectral measure of $G$. Application-wise, this result enables the estimation of the asymptotic performance of single-layer random neural networks. This in turn provides practical insights into the underlying mechanisms into play in random neural networks, entailing several unexpected consequences, as well as a fast practical means to tune the network hyperparameters.


          On-the-Fly Computation of Bisimilarity Distances. (arXiv:1702.08306v2 [cs.LO] UPDATED)   

Authors: Giorgio Bacci, Giovanni Bacci, Kim G. Larsen, Radu Mardare

We propose a distance between continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs) and study the problem of computing it by comparing three different algorithmic methodologies: iterative, linear program, and on-the-fly. In a work presented at FoSSaCS'12, Chen et al. characterized the bisimilarity distance of Desharnais et al. between discrete-time Markov chains as an optimal solution of a linear program that can be solved by using the ellipsoid method. Inspired by their result, we propose a novel linear program characterization to compute the distance in the continuous-time setting. Differently from previous proposals, ours has a number of constraints that is bounded by a polynomial in the size of the CTMC. This, in particular, proves that the distance we propose can be computed in polynomial time. Despite its theoretical importance, the proposed linear program characterization turns out to be inefficient in practice. Nevertheless, driven by the encouraging results of our previous work presented at TACAS'13, we propose an efficient on-the-fly algorithm, which, unlike the other mentioned solutions, computes the distances between two given states avoiding an exhaustive exploration of the state space. This technique works by successively refining over-approximations of the target distances using a greedy strategy, which ensures that the state space is further explored only when the current approximations are improved. Tests performed on a consistent set of (pseudo)randomly generated CTMCs show that our algorithm improves, on average, the efficiency of the corresponding iterative and linear program methods with orders of magnitude.


          CIFT: Crowd-Informed Fine-Tuning to Improve Machine Learning Ability. (arXiv:1702.08563v2 [cs.CL] UPDATED)   

Authors: John P. Lalor, Hao Wu, Hong Yu

Item Response Theory (IRT) allows for measuring ability of Machine Learning models as compared to a human population. However, it is difficult to create a large dataset to train the ability of deep neural network models (DNNs). We propose Crowd-Informed Fine-Tuning (CIFT) as a new training process, where a pre-trained model is fine-tuned with a specialized supplemental training set obtained via IRT model-fitting on a large set of crowdsourced response patterns. With CIFT we can leverage the specialized set of data obtained through IRT to inform parameter tuning in DNNs. We experiment with two loss functions in CIFT to represent (i) memorization of fine-tuning items and (ii) learning a probability distribution over potential labels that is similar to the crowdsourced distribution over labels to simulate crowd knowledge. Our results show that CIFT improves ability for a state-of-the art DNN model for Recognizing Textual Entailment (RTE) tasks and is generalizable to a large-scale RTE test set.


          Progress Estimation and Phase Detection for Sequential Processes. (arXiv:1702.08623v2 [cs.LG] UPDATED)   

Authors: Xinyu Li, Yanyi Zhang, Jianyu Zhang, Yueyang Chen, Shuhong Chen, Yue Gu, Moliang Zhou, Richard A. Farneth, Ivan Marsic, Randall S. Burd

Process modeling and understanding are fundamental for advanced human-computer interfaces and automation systems. Much recent research focused on activity recognition and little has been done on process progress detection from sensor data. We introduced a real-time, sensor-based system for modeling, recognizing and estimating the progress of a work process. We implemented a multimodal deep learning structure to extract the relevant spatio-temporal features from multimodal sensory inputs and used a novel deep regression structure for overall completeness estimation. Using process completeness estimation with a Gaussian mixture model, our system can predict the phase for sequential processes. The performance speed, calculated from completeness estimates, allows online estimation of the remaining time. To help the training of our system, we introduced a novel rectified hyperbolic tangent (rtanh) activation function and conditional loss. Our system was tested on data obtained from a medical process (trauma resuscitation) and sports events (Olympic swimming competition). Our system outperformed existing trauma-resuscitation phase detectors with over 86% phase detection accuracy, 0.67 F1-score, under 12.65% completeness estimation error, and less than 7.5 minutes time-remaining estimation error. For the Olympic swimming dataset, our system achieved 88% accuracy, 0.58 F1-score, 6.32% completeness estimation error and an average 2.9 minute time-remaining estimation error.


          Transfer learning for music classification and regression tasks. (arXiv:1703.09179v2 [cs.CV] UPDATED)   

Authors: Keunwoo Choi, György Fazekas, Mark Sandler, Kyunghyun Cho

In this paper, we present a transfer learning approach for music classification and regression tasks. We propose to use a pre-trained convnet feature, a concatenated feature vector using the activations of feature maps of multiple layers in a trained convolutional network. We show how this convnet feature can serve as a general-purpose music representation. In the experiments, a convnet is trained for music tagging and then transferred to other music-related classification and regression tasks. The convnet feature outperforms the baseline MFCC feature in all the considered tasks and several previous approaches aggregating MFCCs as well as low- and high-level music features.


          Time Series Cluster Kernel for Learning Similarities between Multivariate Time Series with Missing Data. (arXiv:1704.00794v2 [stat.ML] UPDATED)   

Authors: Karl Øyvind Mikalsen, Filippo Maria Bianchi, Cristina Soguero-Ruiz, Robert Jenssen

Similarity-based approaches represent a promising direction for time series analysis. However, many such methods rely on parameter tuning, and some have shortcomings if the time series are multivariate (MTS), due to dependencies between attributes, or the time series contain missing data. In this paper, we address these challenges within the powerful context of kernel methods by proposing the robust \emph{time series cluster kernel} (TCK). The approach taken leverages the missing data handling properties of Gaussian mixture models (GMM) augmented with informative prior distributions. An ensemble learning approach is exploited to ensure robustness to parameters by combining the clustering results of many GMM to form the final kernel.

We evaluate the TCK on synthetic and real data and compare to other state-of-the-art techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that the TCK is robust to parameter choices, provides competitive results for MTS without missing data and outstanding results for missing data.


          NOMA based Calibration for Large-Scale Spaceborne Antenna Arrays. (arXiv:1704.03603v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Yujie Lin, Shuai Wang, Xiangyuan Bu, Chengwen Xing, Jianping An

In the parallel calibration for transmitting phased arrays, the calibration receiver must separate the signals belonging to different antenna elements to avoid mutual interference. Existing algorithms encode different antenna elements' radiation with orthogonal signature codes, but these algorithms are far from desired for large-scale spaceborne antenna arrays. Considering the strictly limited resources on satellites, to improve hardware efficiency of large-scale spaceborne antenna arrays, in this work inspired by the idea of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) we design a series of non-orthogonal signature codes for different antenna elements by Cyclically Shifting an m-Sequence (CSmS) with different offsets named as CSmS-NOMA signaling. This design can strike an elegant balance between the performance and complexity and is very suitable for large-scale spaceborne antenna arrays. It is shown that no matter how many antenna elements there are to be calibrated simultaneously, CSmS-NOMA signaling needs only one calibrating waveform generator and one matched filter. Hence it is much more efficient than the existing fully orthogonal schemes. In order to evaluate the achievable calibration accuracy, a unified theoretical framework is developed based on which the relationship between calibration accuracy and signal to noise ratio (SNR) has been clearly revealed. Furthermore, a hardware experiment platform is also built to assess the theoretical work. For all the considered scenarios, it can be concluded that the theoretical, simulated and experimental results coincide with each other perfectly.


          A Component-Based Dual Decomposition Method for the OPF Problem. (arXiv:1704.03647v5 [cs.DC] UPDATED)   

Authors: Sleiman Mhanna, Gregor Verbic, Archie Chapman

This paper proposes a component-based dual decomposition of the nonconvex AC optimal power flow (OPF) problem, where the modified dual function is solved in a distributed fashion. The main contribution of this work is that is demonstrates that a distributed method with carefully tuned parameters can converge to globally optimal solutions despite the inherent nonconvexity of the problem and the absence of theoretical guarantees of convergence. This paper is the first to conduct extensive numerical analysis resulting in the identification and tabulation of the algorithmic parameter settings that are crucial for the convergence of the method on 72 AC OPF test instances. Moreover, this work provides a deeper insight into the geometry of the modified Lagrange dual function of the OPF problem and highlights the conditions that make this function differentiable. This numerical demonstration of convergence coupled with the scalability and the privacy preserving nature of the proposed method brings component-based distributed OPF several steps closer to reality.


          Stability and Recovery for Independence Systems. (arXiv:1705.00127v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Vaggos Chatziafratis, Tim Roughgarden, Jan Vondrak

Two genres of heuristics that are frequently reported to perform much better on "real-world" instances than in the worst case are greedy algorithms and local search algorithms. In this paper, we systematically study these two types of algorithms for the problem of maximizing a monotone submodular set function subject to downward-closed feasibility constraints. We consider perturbation-stable instances, in the sense of Bilu and Linial, and precisely identify the stability threshold beyond which these algorithms are guaranteed to recover the optimal solution. Byproducts of our work include the first definition of perturbation-stability for non-additive objective functions, and a resolution of the worst-case approximation guarantee of local search in p-extendible systems.


          On Optimal Mechanisms in the Two-Item Single-Buyer Unit-Demand Setting. (arXiv:1705.01821v2 [cs.GT] UPDATED)   

Authors: D. Thirumulanathan, Rajesh Sundaresan, Y Narahari

We consider the problem of finding an optimal mechanism in the two-item, single-buyer, unit-demand setting so that the expected revenue to the seller is maximized. The buyer's valuation for the two items $(z_1,z_2)$ is assumed to be uniformly distributed in an arbitrary rectangle $[c,c+b_1]\times[c,c+b_2]$ in the positive quadrant, having its left-bottom corner on the line $z_1=z_2$. The exact solution in the setting without the unit-demand constraint can be computed using the dual approach designed in Daskalakis et al. [Econ. and Computation, 2015]. However, in the unit-demand setting, computing the optimal solution via the dual approach turns out to be a much harder, nontrivial problem; the dual approach does not offer a clear way of finding the dual measure. In this paper, we first show that the structure of the dual measure shows significant variations for different values of $(c,b_1,b_2)$ which makes it hard to discover the correct dual measure, and hence to compute the solution. We then nontrivially extend the virtual valuation method of Pavlov [Jour. Theoretical Econ., 2011] to provide a complete, explicit solution for the problem considered. In particular, we prove that the optimal mechanism is structured into five simple menus. Finally, we conjecture, with promising preliminary results, that the optimal mechanism when the valuations are uniformly distributed in an arbitrary rectangle $[c_1,c_1+b_1]\times[c_2,c_2+b_2]$ is also structured according to similar menus.


          4d isip: 4d implicit surface interest point detection. (arXiv:1705.03634v2 [cs.CV] UPDATED)   

Authors: Shirui Li, Alper Yilmaz, Changlin Xiao, Hua Li

In this paper, we propose a new method to detect 4D spatiotemporal interest points though an implicit surface, we refer to as the 4D-ISIP. We use a 3D volume which has a truncated signed distance function(TSDF) for every voxel to represent our 3D object model. The TSDF represents the distance between the spatial points and object surface points which is an implicit surface representation. Our novelty is to detect the points where the local neighborhood has significant variations along both spatial and temporal directions. We established a system to acquire 3D human motion dataset using only one Kinect. Experimental results show that our method can detect 4D-ISIP for different human actions.


          Hardware Automated Dataflow Deployment of CNNs. (arXiv:1705.04543v3 [cs.OH] UPDATED)   

Authors: Kamel Abdelouahab, Maxime Pelcat, Jocelyn Serot, Cedric Bourrasset, Jean-Charles Quinton, François Berry

Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) are the state of the art systems for image classification and scene understating. However, such techniques are computationally intensive and involve highly regular parallel computation. CNNs can thus benefit from a significant acceleration in execution time when running on fine grain programmable logic devices. As a consequence, several studies have proposed FPGA-based accelerators for CNNs. However, because of the huge amount of the required hardware resources, none of these studies directly was based on a direct mapping of the CNN computing elements onto the FPGA physical resources. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of this so-called direct hardware mapping approach and discuss several associated implementation issues. As a proof of concept, we introduce the haddoc2 open source tool, that is able to automatically transform a CNN description into a platform independent hardware description for FPGA implementation.


          Fake it till you make it: Fishing for Catfishes. (arXiv:1705.06530v2 [cs.SI] UPDATED)   

Authors: Walid Magdy, Yehia Elkhatib, Gareth Tyson, Sagar Joglekar, Nishanth Sastry

Many adult content websites incorporate social networking features. Although these are popular, they raise significant challenges, including the potential for users to "catfish", i.e., to create fake profiles to deceive other users. This paper takes an initial step towards automated catfish detection. We explore the characteristics of the different age and gender groups, identifying a number of distinctions. Through this, we train models based on user profiles and comments, via the ground truth of specially verified profiles. Applying our models for age and gender estimation of unverified profiles, we identify 38% of profiles who are likely lying about their age, and 25% who are likely lying about their gender. We find that women have a greater propensity to catfish than men. Further, whereas women catfish select from a wide age range, men consistently lie about being younger. Our work has notable implications on operators of such online social networks, as well as users who may worry about interacting with catfishes.


          Recurrent Additive Networks. (arXiv:1705.07393v2 [cs.CL] UPDATED)   

Authors: Kenton Lee, Omer Levy, Luke Zettlemoyer

We introduce recurrent additive networks (RANs), a new gated RNN which is distinguished by the use of purely additive latent state updates. At every time step, the new state is computed as a gated component-wise sum of the input and the previous state, without any of the non-linearities commonly used in RNN transition dynamics. We formally show that RAN states are weighted sums of the input vectors, and that the gates only contribute to computing the weights of these sums. Despite this relatively simple functional form, experiments demonstrate that RANs perform on par with LSTMs on benchmark language modeling problems. This result shows that many of the non-linear computations in LSTMs and related networks are not essential, at least for the problems we consider, and suggests that the gates are doing more of the computational work than previously understood.


          Multiresolution Priority Queues. (arXiv:1705.09642v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)   

Authors: Jordi Ros-Giralt, Alan Commike, Peter Cullen, Jeff Lucovsky, Dilip Madathil, Richard Lethin

Priority queues are container data structures essential to many high performance computing (HPC) applications. In this paper, we introduce multiresolution priority queues, a data structure that improves the performance of the standard heap based implementations by trading off a controllable amount of resolution in the space of priorities. The new data structure can reduce the worst case performance of inserting an element from O(log(n)) to O(log(r)), where n is the number of elements in the queue and r is the number of resolution groups in the priority space. The worst case cost of removing the top element is O(1). When the number of elements in the table is high, the amortized cost to insert an element becomes O(1).


          Unsupervised Person Re-identification: Clustering and Fine-tuning. (arXiv:1705.10444v2 [cs.CV] UPDATED)   

Authors: Hehe Fan, Liang Zheng, Yi Yang

The superiority of deeply learned pedestrian representations has been reported in very recent literature of person re-identification (re-ID). In this paper, we consider the more pragmatic issue of learning a deep feature with no or only a few labels. We propose a progressive unsupervised learning (PUL) method to transfer pretrained deep representations to unseen domains. Our method is easy to implement and can be viewed as an effective baseline for unsupervised re-ID feature learning. Specifically, PUL iterates between 1) pedestrian clustering and 2) fine-tuning of the convolutional neural network (CNN) to improve the original model trained on the irrelevant labeled dataset. Since the clustering results can be very noisy, we add a selection operation between the clustering and fine-tuning. At the beginning when the model is weak, CNN is fine-tuned on a small amount of reliable examples which locate near to cluster centroids in the feature space. As the model becomes stronger in subsequent iterations, more images are being adaptively selected as CNN training samples. Progressively, pedestrian clustering and the CNN model are improved simultaneously until algorithm convergence. This process is naturally formulated as self-paced learning. We then point out promising directions that may lead to further improvement. Extensive experiments on three large-scale re-ID datasets demonstrate that PUL outputs discriminative features that improve the re-ID accuracy.


          Multi-point Codes from the GGS Curves. (arXiv:1706.00313v3 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Chuangqiang Hu, Shudi Yang

This paper is concerned with the construction of algebraic geometric codes defined from GGS curves. It is of significant use to describe bases for the Riemann-Roch spaces associated with totally ramified places, which enables us to study multi-point AG codes. Along this line, we characterize explicitly the Weierstrass semigroups and pure gaps. Additionally, we determine the floor of a certain type of divisor and investigate the properties of AG codes from GGS curves. Finally, we apply these results to find multi-point codes with excellent parameters. As one of the examples, a presented code with parameters $ [216,190,\geqslant 18] $ over $ \mathbb{F}_{64} $ yields a new record.


          Decentralized Certificate Authorities. (arXiv:1706.03370v2 [cs.CR] UPDATED)   

Authors: Bargav Jayaraman, Hannah Li, David Evans

The security of TLS depends on trust in certificate authorities, and that trust stems from their ability to protect and control the use of a private signing key. The signing key is the key asset of a certificate authority (CA), and its value is based on trust in the corresponding public key which is primarily distributed by browser vendors. Compromise of a CA private key represents a single point-of-failure that could have disastrous consequences, so CAs go to great lengths to attempt to protect and control the use of their private keys. Nevertheless, keys are sometimes compromised and may be misused accidentally or intentionally by insiders. We propose a new model where a CA's private key is split among multiple parties, and signatures are produced using a secure multi-party computation protocol that never exposes the actual signing key. This could be used by a single CA to reduce the risk that its signing key would be compromised or misused. It could also enable new models for certificate generation, where multiple CAs would need to agree and cooperate before a new certificate can be generated, or even where certificate generation would require cooperation between a CA and the certificate recipient (subject). We demonstrate the practicality of this concept with an evaluation of a prototype implementation that uses secure two-party computation to generate certificates signed using ECDSA on curve secp192k1.


          Nonbacktracking Bounds on the Influence in Independent Cascade Models. (arXiv:1706.05295v2 [cs.SI] UPDATED)   

Authors: Emmanuel Abbe, Sanjeev Kulkarni, Eun Jee Lee

This paper develops upper and lower bounds on the influence measure in a network, more precisely, the expected number of nodes that a seed set can influence in the independent cascade model. In particular, our bounds exploit nonbacktracking walks, Fortuin-Kasteleyn-Ginibre (FKG) type inequalities, and are computed by message passing implementation. Nonbacktracking walks have recently allowed for headways in community detection, and this paper shows that their use can also impact the influence computation. Further, we provide a knob to control the trade-off between the efficiency and the accuracy of the bounds. Finally, the tightness of the bounds is illustrated with simulations on various network models.


          Twigraph: Discovering and Visualizing Influential Words between Twitter Profiles. (arXiv:1706.05361v2 [cs.SI] UPDATED)   

Authors: Dhanasekar Sundararaman, Sudharshan Srinivasan

The social media craze is on an ever increasing spree, and people are connected with each other like never before, but these vast connections are visually unexplored. We propose a methodology Twigraph to explore the connections between persons using their Twitter profiles. First, we propose a hybrid approach of recommending social media profiles, articles, and advertisements to a user.The profiles are recommended based on the similarity score between the user profile, and profile under evaluation. The similarity between a set of profiles is investigated by finding the top influential words thus causing a high similarity through an Influence Term Metric for each word. Then, we group profiles of various domains such as politics, sports, and entertainment based on the similarity score through a novel clustering algorithm. The connectivity between profiles is envisaged using word graphs that help in finding the words that connect a set of profiles and the profiles that are connected to a word. Finally, we analyze the top influential words over a set of profiles through clustering by finding the similarity of that profiles enabling to break down a Twitter profile with a lot of followers to fine level word connections using word graphs. The proposed method was implemented on datasets comprising 1.1 M Tweets obtained from Twitter. Experimental results show that the resultant influential words were highly representative of the relationship between two profiles or a set of profiles


          Obfuscation in Bitcoin: Techniques and Politics. (arXiv:1706.05432v2 [cs.CY] UPDATED)   

Authors: Arvind Narayanan, Malte Möser

In the cryptographic currency Bitcoin, all transactions are recorded in the blockchain - a public, global, and immutable ledger. Because transactions are public, Bitcoin and its users employ obfuscation to maintain a degree of financial privacy. Critically, and in contrast to typical uses of obfuscation, in Bitcoin obfuscation is not aimed against the system designer but is instead enabled by design. We map sixteen proposed privacy-preserving techniques for Bitcoin on an obfuscation-vs.-cryptography axis, and find that those that are used in practice tend toward obfuscation. We argue that this has led to a balance between privacy and regulatory acceptance.


          Variable-to-Fixed Length Homophonic Coding Suitable for Asymmetric Channel Coding. (arXiv:1706.06775v2 [cs.IT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Junya Honda, Hirosuke Yamamoto

In communication through asymmetric channels the capacity-achieving input distribution is not uniform in general. Homophonic coding is a framework to invertibly convert a (usually uniform) message into a sequence with some target distribution, and is a promising candidate to generate codewords with the nonuniform target distribution for asymmetric channels. In particular, a Variable-to-Fixed length (VF) homophonic code can be used as a suitable component for channel codes to avoid decoding error propagation. However, the existing VF homophonic code requires the knowledge of the maximum relative gap of probabilities between two adjacent sequences beforehand, which is an unrealistic assumption for long block codes. In this paper we propose a new VF homophonic code without such a requirement by allowing one-symbol decoding delay. We evaluate this code theoretically and experimentally to verify its asymptotic optimality.


          An End-to-End Computer Vision Pipeline for Automated Cardiac Function Assessment by Echocardiography. (arXiv:1706.07342v2 [cs.CV] UPDATED)   

Authors: Rahul C. Deo, Jeffrey Zhang, Laura A. Hallock, Sravani Gajjala, Lauren Nelson, Eugene Fan, Mandar A. Aras, ChaRandle Jordan, Kirsten E. Fleischmann, Michelle Melisko, Atif Qasim, Sanjiv J. Shah, Ruzena Bajcsy

Background: Automated cardiac image interpretation has the potential to transform clinical practice in multiple ways including enabling low-cost assessment of cardiac function in the primary care setting. We hypothesized that advances in computer vision could enable building a fully automated, scalable analysis pipeline for echocardiogram (echo) interpretation, with a focus on evaluation of left ventricular function. Methods: Our approach entailed: 1) preprocessing, which includes auto-downloading of echo studies, metadata extraction, de-identification, and conversion of images into numerical arrays; 2) convolutional neural networks (CNN) for view identification; 3) localization of the left ventricle and delineation of cardiac boundaries using active appearance models (AAM); 4) identification of properly segmented images using gradient boosting; and 5) particle tracking to compute longitudinal strain. Results: CNNs identified views with high accuracy (e.g. 95% for apical 4-chamber) and the combination of CNN/bounding box determination/AAM effectively segmented 67-88% of videos. We analyzed 2775 apical videos from patients with heart failure and found good concordance with vendor-derived longitudinal strain measurements, both at the individual video level (r=0.77) and at the patient level (r=0.51). We also analyzed 9402 videos from breast cancer patients undergoing serial monitoring for trastuzumab cardiotoxicity to illustrate the potential for automated, quality-weighted modeling of patient trajectories. Conclusions: We demonstrate the feasibility of a fully automated echocardiography analysis pipeline for assessment of left ventricular function. Our work lays the groundwork for using automated interpretation to support point-of-care handheld cardiac ultrasound and may enable large-scale analysis of the millions of echos currently archived within healthcare systems.


          On the selection of polynomials for the DLP algorithm. (arXiv:1706.08447v2 [math.NT] UPDATED)   

Authors: Giacomo Micheli

In this paper we characterize the set of polynomials $f\in\mathbb F_q[X]$ satisfying the following property: there exists a positive integer $d$ such that for any positive integer $\ell$ less or equal than the degree of $f$, there exists $t_0$ in $\mathbb F_{q^d}$ such that the polynomial $f-t_0$ has an irreducible factor of degree $\ell$ over $\mathbb F_{q^d}[X]$. This result is then used to progress in the last step which is needed to remove the heuristic from one of the quasi-polynomial time algorithms for discrete logarithm problems (DLP) in small characteristic. Our characterization allows a construction of polynomials satisfying the wanted property.


          Compact arrangement for femtosecond laser induced generation of broadband hard x-ray pulses   
arXiv:1706.06819

by: Giles, Carlos
Abstract:
We present a simple apparatus for femtosecond laser induced generation of X-rays. The apparatus consists of a vacuum chamber containing an off-axis parabolic focusing mirror, a reel system, a debris protection setup, a quartz window for the incoming laser beam, and an X-ray window. Before entering the vacuum chamber, the femtosecond laser is expanded with an all reflective telescope design to minimize laser intensity losses and pulse broadening while allowing for focusing as well as peak intensity optimization. The laser pulse duration was characterized by second-harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating. A high spatial resolution knife-edge technique was implemented to characterize the beam size at the focus of the X-ray generation apparatus. We have characterized x-ray spectra obtained with three different samples: titanium, iron:chromium alloy, and copper. In all three cases, the femtosecond laser generated X-rays give spectral lines consistent with literature reports. We present a rms amplitude analysis of the generated X-ray pulses, and provide an upper bound for the duration of the X-ray pulses.
           Sol    




 Linda  Imagem né verdade ?







Olhando assim até parece que esse lindo brilho emitido por uma estrela a centenas de milhares de km de ditância da Terra é pequena.





....
 Astronomia uma ciência que estuda os astros_ uma designação comum a todos os corpos celestes, ou seja, tudo que está disperso no universo são corpos celestes, uma simples poeira cosmica, até gigantescas estrelas. Falando em estrelas, corpos compostos por 99% de gases, sendo helio e hidrogênio, e claro que há também fragmentos rochosos.
O Sol formou-se cerca de 4,57 bilhões (4,567 mil milhões) de anos atrás quando uma nuvem molecular entrou em colapso. Evolução estelar é medida em duas maneiras: através da presente idade da sequência principal do Sol, que é determinada através de modelagens computacionais de evolução estelar; e nucleocosmocronologia. A idade medida através destes procedimentos está de acordo com a idade radiométrica do material mais antigo encontrado no Sistema Solar, que possui 4,567 bilhões (4,567 mil milhões) de anos.
Em cerca de 5 bilhões (5 mil milhões) de anos, o hidrogênio no núcleo solar esgotará. Quando isto ocorrer, o Sol entrará em contração devido à sua própria gravidade, elevando a temperatura do núcleo solar até 100 milhões de kelvins, suficiente para iniciar a fusão nuclear de hélio, produzindo carbono, entrando na fase do ramo gigante assimptótico.



O destino da Terra é precário. Como uma gigante vermelha, o Sol terá um raio máximo maior de 250 UA, maior do que a órbita atual da Terra. Porém, quando o Sol tornar-se uma gigante vermelha, a estrela terá perdido cerca de 30% de sua massa atual, devido à massa perdida no vento solar, com os planetas afastando-se gradualmente do Sol, à medida que o Sol perde massa. Este fator por si mesmo provavelmente seria o suficiente para permitir que a Terra não fosse engolida pelo Sol, visto que a Terra afastar-se-ia o suficiente da estrela, mas pesquisas recentes mostram que a Terra será engolida pelo Sol devido à forças de maré.

Mesmo que a Terra não seja incinerada pelo Sol, a água do planeta evaporará, e a maior parte de sua atmosfera escapará para o espaço. De fato, o Sol gradualmente torna-se mais brilhante com o passar do tempo, mesmo na sequência principal (10% a cada 1 000 000 000 anos), com sua temperatura de superfície gradualmente aumentando com o tempo. O Sol foi no passado menos brilhante, sendo que no início possuía 75% da luminosidade atual, uma possível razão pela qual vida em terra firme somente existiu nos últimos 1 000 000 000 anos. Em outros 1 000 000 000 anos, o aumento da temperatura fará com que a superfície da Terra torne-se quente demais para possibilitar a existência de água líquida, e portanto, impossibilitará vida na Terra em sua forma atual.

A fusão de hélio sustentará o Sol por cerca de 100 milhões de anos, quando então o hélio no núcleo solar esgotará. O Sol não possui massa o suficiente para converter carbono em oxigênio, e portanto, não explodirá como uma supernova. Ao invés disso, após o término da fusão de hélio, intensas pulsações térmicas farão com que o Sol ejete suas camadas exteriores, formando uma nebulosa planetária. O único objeto que permanecerá após a ejeção será o extremamente quente núcleo solar, que resfriará gradualmente, permanecendo como uma anã branca com metade da massa atual (com o diâmetro da Terra) por bilhões (mil milhões) de anos. Este cenário de evolução estelar é típico de estrelas de massa moderada e baixa.


 é  incrível como uma simples e linda imagem como esta pode parecer que nossa estrela é pequena e está logo " ali", bem próxima de nós, mas é enorme e está a uma distância da Terra de cerca de 150 milhões de km.