250670-2017: Belgique-Evere: Services de cartographie maritime   
Date de publication: 30/06/2017 | Date limite: 06-09-2017 | Document: Avis de marché
          How a new northern mapping project is preserving Inuit traditional knowledge   
Mapping, atlas, Inuit, traditional knowledge, Carleton University, Nunavut, Clyde River, science, wildlife

A new mapping project in Clyde River, Nunavut, is bringing generations of Inuit knowledge and decades of science together at the click of a mouse. 

Clyde River’s Ittaq Heritage and Research Centre is creating an interactive atlas with help from the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre at Carleton University. The atlas provides easy access to information that was previously hard to find or simply hadn’t been recorded, including scientific studies from the area and local knowledge about the environment and wildlife habitat, history and place names. 


          Comment un nouveau projet de cartographie du Nord préserve le savoir traditionnel des Inuits   
Mapping, atlas, Inuit, traditional knowledge, Carleton University, Nunavut, Clyde River, science, wildlife

Un nouveau projet de cartographie à Clyde River (Nunavut) réunit des générations de connaissances inuites et des décennies de science en un clic de la souris. 


          Angola: Group to License Cartography Companies   
[ANGOP] Luanda -The Geodesic Cadastral Institute of Angola (IGCA) was allowed on Wednesday by the Cabinet Council to license all public and private cartography entities in the country.
          Authentic Models 1739 Paris Map, Portfolio   

Wall Decor

This 25 sheet 1739 Paris Portfolio can be put together to create a complete map of Paris. It assembles into a 240 x 190cm wall area, making it an astonishing piece of wall decor. Not to be missed, this map is exceptional value for such an exquisite technical achievement.

Extraordinary Feat of Cartography

This enormous reproduction Authentic Models Paris Map is one of the most decorative and celebrated maps ever made.  An extraordinary feat of cartography, it was originally drawn by French explorer Etienne Turgot in 1739. The detailing is unimaginable; every window, chimney and turret of the pre-Hausmann era is shown. This Herculean project took over five years to complete and is a truly remarkable achievement, created many years before the first manned balloon flight and the invention of photography.

18th Century Paris

Printed in heavy art card stock; every street, house, church and park of 18th century Paris is shown in fine detail. 

Price: £56.25 Special Price: £42.19


          Authentic Models 1921 USA Globe   

Contemporary Globe

The Authentic Models Replica 1921 USA Globe is a contemporary classic, depicting a more modern and more recognisable world globe. It is made with an ebonised rosewood stand accentuated in nickel plated brass. Globes like this would make wonderful pieces of decor in a sophisticated study or library, or even a child's bedroom.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been resurrected and continued by Authentic Models. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers of all time; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and appeal.

Price: £62.50 Special Price: £46.88


          Authentic Models Globe Mobile   

Educational

This Authentic Models' Globe Mobile includes miniature globes that represent the increasing knowledge of explorers over five centuries. Symbolising the advancement of technology, cartography and scientific enquiry, the globes increase their detail with each century and show the gradual pushing back of boundaries. Highly educational, these globes are perfect for a child's bedroom, or even an adults' study or library.

Drowsy or Enquiring Minds

This Globe Mobile is sure to arouse interest in planets and their clockwork movements and orbits in a curious child's mind. At the same time, the graceful patterns of the globes can also bring about a hypnotic effect, hastening sleep to a drowsy mind...

Decor

Decorated with different styles, hues and colours, these globes are beautiful. They would make for a fascinating and elegant piece of home decor. 

Price: £56.25 Special Price: £42.19


          Authentic Models Globe Vaugondy Colour - Medium   

Decoration is combined with history and exploration in this Vaugondy Globe by Authentic Models.  18th C. cartography in fashionable 21st C. colors.  Seen on tables in the salons reviewed in the likes of Elle Décor, The World of Interiors, House & Garden.  Display on mahogany, bronze or polished aluminum turned stands.  Enjoy a mix of sizes and colors and explore the routes followed by early explorers.  Stimulating, extraordinary, poetic.

Price: £9.58 Special Price: £7.19


          Authentic Models Globe Vaugondy Ivory - Medium   

Decoration mixed with history and exploration. 18th C. cartography in fashionable 21st C. colors. Seen on tables in the salons reviewed in the likes of Elle Décor, The World of Interiors, House & Garden. Display on mahogany, bronze or polished aluminum turned stands. Enjoy a mix of sizes and colors, explore the routes followed by early explorers. Stimulating, extraordinary, poetic.

Price: £9.58 Special Price: £7.19


          Authentic Models Hondius Globe   

17th Century Globe

Authentic Models Hondius Globe is a representation of a globe from 1627. It stands on a classic table stand that has been hand-rubbed and French finished. Spin the globe, enjoy a touch of history and see the world through the eyes of past explorers. A wonderful piece of sophisticated decor, this globe could be considered a fantastic collector's item, and it would look lovely in a gentleman's office or study.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been continued by AM. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a famous leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers in the world; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £158.33 Special Price: £118.75


          Authentic Models Library Globe   

Library Globe

The Authentic Models Library Globe is a classic Vaugondy French globe. No Renaissance library, reception room, or merchant’s office was complete without a large globe on a stand. Mapmakers and globe publishers issued new globes every year, keeping clients up to date on the latest discoveries and explorations. Authentic Models Library Globe has a 32 cm (12.5”) globe with floor stand in the classical form used over the centuries. It would be perfect for a sophisticated study or library.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been resurrected by AM. This Library globe has been handmade with exact map reproductions in 12 sections to make one whole. It has a solid bronze, engraved meridian ring and a rich, classic wood floor stand that has been French finished to give it a beautifully aged, authentic look. The stand disassembles into two pieces, making it easy to ship. It is a truly beautiful piece of decor.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £291.67 Special Price: £218.75


          Authentic Models Navigator's Terresterial Globe   

16th Century Replica

The Authentic Models Navigator's Terresterial Globe is a beautiful replica of a medium-size 16th Century Mercator globe. It has been mounted on a classic library desk stand of hand-turned cherry wood, of a style and design found in many originals that are now exhibited in science and maritime museums. A wonderful momento of the age of exploration, this globe is highly decorative. It would look lovely in a sophisticated library or study, as an exquisite piece of decor.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. The paper zodiac band circling the equator was originally drawn by Mercator himself. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been continued by AM. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere. The Navigator's globe has a bronze meridian ring mounted with a small bronze pole circle and pointer. 

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a famous leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers in the world; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £106.25 Special Price: £79.69


          Authentic Models Old World Globe and Stand   

17th Century Globe

Authentic Models Old World Globe and Stand; the Old World at your fingertips! A 17th century Hondius globe unites precious bronze on a classic globe rosewood stand that has been hand-rubbed and French finished. Spin the globe, enjoy a touch of history and see the world through the eyes of past explorers. A wonderful piece of sophisticated decor, this globe could be considered a fantastic collector's item.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been resurrected and continued by AM. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £158.33 Special Price: £118.75


          Authentic Models Pair of Heaven and Earth Globes   

The World & the Heavens

The Pair of Heaven and Earth Globes by Authentic Models are wonderful replica globes which perfectly compliment to each other. One globe charts the terrestrial world as it was known in 1551 and the other the charts the heavens as it was believed to be in 1551 with wonderfully recaptured images of the constellations all named and drawn as Mythological figures.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and wonderful appeal.

Price: £13.33 Special Price: £10.00


          Authentic Models Plancius Planisphere 1604   

Wall Art

Plancius Planisphere 1604 Wall Map. A fabulous reproduction of an early 17th century map of the world. Providing wonderful historical provenance as well as being a great piece of wall art, the map is placed between cherry wood slats, and has been giclee printed on durable fabric. The original in the Bibliotheque nationale de France, but this is a wonderfully detailed reproduction and a fantastic work of art.

Moment in History

An incredible effort and one of the most decorative and detailed maps ever made, Plancius added all his latest discoveries to his map. Interestingly, this map shows empty cartouches because Plancius was probably still trying to get a royal sponsorship for his work when this print was made. The map is a moment in history, and an insight into the Renaissance mind.

Renaissance Map

Renaissance culture was highly appreciative of the concept of the universal man. Studying and mastering multiple disciplines was admired. Petrus Plancius was such a man. He was both a practicing theologian and a skilled cartographer, and even became an astronomer. Plancius made his famous large size wall map of the known world in the late 16th/early 17th century. 

Price: £191.67 Special Price: £143.75


          Authentic Models Replica 1745 Vaugondy Globe   

18th Century Replica

The Authentic Models Replica 1745 Vaugondy Globe is a wonderful replica of a classic Vaugondy Globe, and it makes a fascinating insight into the knowledge of the world in the middle of the 18th century.  

Packaging

Beautifully packaged in a round box for safe keeping (8.5cm / 3.25" diameter), this globe would make an interesting piece of decoration.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and wonderful appeal.

Price: £8.75 Special Price: £6.56


          Authentic Models Replica Mercator Globe on Stand   

16th Century Globe

The Authentic Models Mercator Globe on Stand is from 1541, making it a representation of one of the oldest globes on offer. It unites solid brass hardware that has been bronzed on a classic ebonised wood stand that has been hand-rubbed and French finished. Spin the globe, enjoy a touch of history and see the Old World through the eyes of explorers from the past. A wonderful piece of sophisticated decor, this globe could be considered a fantastic collector's item. Are you ready to step back in time?

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been resurrected and continued by AM. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere. Solid and still fragile, the finishing result is elegant and imposingly present.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and wonderful appeal.

Price: £158.33 Special Price: £118.75


          Authentic Models Replica Vaugondy 1745 Globe on stand   

Sophisticated Decor

This Authentic Models Vaugondy globe on stand from circa 1795 has a hand turned tabletop, polished wood and bronze. A striking piece of decor, it would look wonderful placed on a desk or bookshelf in a sophisticated gentleman's office.

Historical Significance

Gilles Robert de Vaugondy and his son Didier were the leading mapmakers in France during the 1700s. Didier was appointed geographer to King Louis XV in 1760 and published globes of various sizes, the biggest with a diameter of 2.6m! Authentic Models Vaugondy globes are created with the 18th century mapmakers in mind.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a famous leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers in the world; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £158.33 Special Price: £118.75


          Authentic Models Replica Vaugondy 1745 Globe on stand   

Sophisticated Decor

This Authentic Models Vaugondy globe on stand from circa 1795 has a hand turned tabletop, polished wood and bronze. A striking piece of decor, it would look wonderful placed on a desk or bookshelf in a sophisticated gentleman's office.

Historical Significance

Gilles Robert de Vaugondy and his son Didier were the leading mapmakers in France during the 1700s. Didier was appointed geographer to King Louis XV in 1760 and published globes of various sizes, the biggest with a diameter of 2.6m! Authentic Models Vaugondy globes are created with the 18th century mapmakers in mind.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a famous leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers in the world; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £30.00 Special Price: £22.50


          Authentic Models Replica Vaugondy 1745 Hanging Globe   

Gilles Robert de Vaugondy and his son Didier were the leading mapmakers in France during the 1700's. Didier was appointed geographer to Louis XV. All AM globes are made using original charts, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal. A faithful reproduction of their cartography, it would look beautiful hanging in any room. This 18th century replica globe comes with bronzes axis, engraved pole caps and classic hooks for hanging.

Price: £93.33 Special Price: £70.00


          Authentic Models Replica Weber Costello 1921 Globe on Stand   

Contemporary Globe

The Replica Weber Costello 1921 Globe on Stand is a contemporary classic, depicting a more modern and more recognisable world globe. It is made with a solid hardwood stand with chrome finial and feet. Globes like this would make wonderful pieces of decor in a sophisticated study or library, or even a child's bedroom.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the smallest of globes. Centuries ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been resurrected and continued by AM. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers of all time; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and appeal.

Price: £131.25 Special Price: £98.44


          Authentic Models Reproduction New World Map   

Map of Discoveries

Authentic Models Reproduction New World Map. Fascinating details such as cartouches of special interest and the routes of famous discoveries are also marked on the paper, making this reproduction map highly interesting as well as beautiful. Handprinted on durable waterproof fabric, this map is custom made with Cherry wood slats and hardware for hanging. It is finished in a beautiful, warm, aged honey and black.

Wall Art

Maps make wonderfully decorative pieces of wall art, especially in a sophisticated study or gentleman's office.

17th Century World

Originally discovered as a series of printed sheets, together these form a wall-sized map of the Atlantic and Pacific according to 17th century cartographers, who were newly mapping the wonders of the New World. It is extremely rare to find maps as old as this where America is at the centre and not Europe.

Price: £191.67 Special Price: £143.75


          Authentic Models Sagittarius Globe on hand cast iron stand   

The arrow-pierced Sagittarius Globe by Authentic Models is a hand made classic reproduction of an original by Robert de Vaugondy, cartographer to Le Roi Soleil, up to date until 1745. The stand is hand cast iron.  Worth every penny to get a conversation going.

Price: £43.33 Special Price: £32.50


          Authentic Models Terrestrial globe with compass   

Historical Replica

The Authentic Models Terrestrial globe with compass is a beautiful little globe on a compass stand set in brass and wood. The globe itself is a copy of a 1541 Mercator globe, and could be used as an interesting piece of home decor in a sophisticated gentleman's office or study.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is key. A complicated 'gravure' printing process is replicated, which results in the sharpest lines, words and symbols even on the very small globes. Many years ago globes were made by gluing copperplate printed gores on a plaster finished papier-mâché core, and this application method has been resurrected and continued by Authentic Models. All globes are handmade from specially reproduced paper gores. Twelve sections are hand glued onto a pastic (for small globes) or papier-mâché (for large globes) sphere.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers of all time; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and appeal.

Price: £56.25 Special Price: £42.19


          Authentic Models Trianon Globe   

French Finish

The Trianon Globe by Authentic Models is a beautiful ivory coloured globe on a solid bronze and french finished rosewood base. The French finish involves at least five coats of varnish being applied, with sanding in between. The idea is to create a rich coat that, together with applications of subtle patinas and mixed waxes, results in an aged and antiqued look.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £38.75 Special Price: £29.06


          Authentic Models Vaugondy Globe 32cm   

Sophisticated Decor; Artisan Creation

This Authentic Models Vaugondy globe from circa 1795 is displayed on an ebonized wood stand accented in nickel-plated brass. A striking piece of decor, it would look wonderful placed on a desk or bookshelf in a sophisticated gentleman's office. Black and ivory gores are applied to the globe core by hand with authentic construction and detail to create this fantastic globe.

Historical Significance

Gilles Robert de Vaugondy and his son Didier were the leading mapmakers in France during the 1700s. Didier was appointed geographer to King Louis XV in 1760 and published globes of various sizes, the biggest with a diameter of 2.6m! Authentic Models Vaugondy globes are created with the 18th century mapmakers in mind.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a famous leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers in the world; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £131.25 Special Price: £98.44


          Authentic Models Venice Portfolio   

Every street, house, church, canal and park is shown in stunning detail in these 8 sheets that fit together to create a complete map of Venice circa 1694.  A man-made city on a swampy lagoon, Venice was a metropolis ruled by Doges and oligarchic nobles in the 17th century.  The city of Palazzos lining the Grand Canal was also the city of Titian and Tiepolo, Marco Polo and Coronelli; where galleys and merchant ships were sent to the farthest corners of the Mediterranean to trade and conquer, and wars were won and lost.  This Authentic Models high-quality diagram of one of the most beautiful cities in the world is a spectacular display of historical art and cartography and will transport you back to the cultural centre of commerce and the arts in the Renaissance world.

Price: £41.67 Special Price: £31.25


          Authentic Models Versailles Globe   

French Globe Replica

The Authentic Models Versailles Globe is based on a simple yet utterly scintillating original French globe and globe stand. A new addition to an already extensive collection, less grandiose than some, this globe is attractive on a small desk or sideboard  Its bookshelf format is oriented to be easy on the eyes. Admire the matching age wood texture and feel and the polished sheen of bronze and brass.

French Finish

This globe is made from solid brass and the rosewood base has been French finished. The French finish involves at least five coats of varnish being applied, with sanding in between. The idea is to create a rich coat that, together with applications of subtle patinas and mixed waxes, results in an aged and antiqued look.

World Leader in Antique Globes

Authentic Models are a renowned leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the world's most famous cartographers; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

Price: £38.75 Special Price: £29.06


          FLYING DOTTED WORLD MAP by atesbnc   
77161270

Description
Animated flying dotted world map.4K.Includes Alpha matte.


Keywords
illustration background design graphic isolated symbol outline map vector abstract art silhouette sign hand image country shape icon business geography global earth continent planet atlas cartography land worldwide globe green screen alpha matte international motion retro element flying map sticker map 4K
          Les Brèves du Service canadien des forêts, Centre de foresterie des Laurentides. 2003. Ressources naturelles Canada, Service canadien des forêts, Centre de foresterie des Laurentides, Ste-Foy, Québec. Les Brèves, Mars 2003 [No 1]. 2 p.   
Chez le peuplier hybride, réduire l'espacement pour augmenter le rendement

Faut-il fertiliser pour aider la reproduction du pin gris dans les vergers à graines?

Première cartographie du génome de l'épinette blanche

Un nouveau piège pour la surveillance de l'arpenteuse de Bruce

Un nouvel indice de qualité de site?

          In Brief from the Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre. 2003. Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, Quebec, QC. In Brief, March 2003 [No 1]. 2 p.   
Chez le peuplier hybride, réduire l'espacement pour augmenter le rendement

Faut-il fertiliser pour aider la reproduction du pin gris dans les vergers à graines?

Première cartographie du génome de l'épinette blanche

Un nouveau piège pour la surveillance de l'arpenteuse de Bruce

          'Sunday in the Park With George' is ravishing; 'Psycho' at the Heights   

From your first view of the stage (white surfaces, white frame, white curtain pooled on the floor) to your last (the cast in their jewel-toned costumes, taking their bows), the Guthrie’s production of “Sunday in the Park With George” is ravishing. Written with playwright James Lapine, Stephen Sondheim’s musical about artists, their art, and their process – and also, peripherally, their lives – should be lovely to look at. So kudos to scenic designer Jan Chambers, who created a world from horizontal and vertical lines. To costume designer Toni-Leslie James for spectacular work throughout, most notably Yvonne’s (Ann Michels’) pink skirt with its cascade of billows down the back. To lighting designer Jane Cox, who stippled the set with color and made everything glow. To projection designer Caite Hevner for gorgeous projections and playful animations.

Directed by Joseph Haj, “Sunday in the Park” ends the thrust stage part of the Guthrie’s 2016-17 mainstage season, the first shaped entirely by Haj in his role as artistic director. The summer musical is a fairly recent tradition for the Guthrie, and this is the theater’s first-ever Sondheim, unless you count “Sweeney Todd” and “Merrily We Roll Along” at the Guthrie Lab in 1999 and 2001.

It’s a musical in which nothing much happens. When people break up, they sing their frustration, then move on. When they die, they do it offstage. The main characters – French post-impressionist painter George Seurat and his modern but made-up great-grandson, a multimedia artist also named George – are all about their work and clumsy at relationships. Original George is a color theory nerd who invents a new way of painting, is rejected by his peers, completes just six major canvases in his lifetime and never sells one. Modern George seems most concerned with securing commissions and connecting with wealthy patrons. Both are terrible boyfriends.

The main and most memorable part of the musical is Act I, about original George and the making of his masterpiece “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte” (which hangs in the Art Institute of Chicago, just down the road). Act II jumps forward a century to modern George and his latest work, “Chromalume #7,” a machine that blows a fuse during the opening. Act I is half again as long as Act II, clocking in at 1 hour 20 minutes against 54 minutes. The main point of Act II seems to be that modern George learns from the past.

Randy Harrison, probably best known as Justin Taylor in “Queer as Folk,” and Erin Mackey, who starred as Nellie in last summer’s musical “South Pacific,” lead a cast of 17, most actors playing two roles. Mackey is both original George’s lover and muse, the cutely named Dot, and modern George’s grandmother, Marie. The other characters are all people from the painting, given loosely sketched, invented identities and personalities: a pair of soldiers, two young women (both named Celeste) who flirt with the soldiers, an old lady (imagined as Seurat’s mother) and her nurse, a cranky boatman, a baker, a snarky successful painter and his wife, a young girl, a coachman. T. Mychael Rambo takes two memorable turns, first as a crass American and then as a wealthy arts patron. When the cast comes together in a tableau of the painting, it’s magical, a feat made more challenging by the thrust stage.

Fans of the original Broadway cast recording with Mandy Patinkin and Bernadette Peters won’t be disappointed with the singing at the Guthrie. Mackey is up to the demands of the tricky title song, and the shift to singing the elderly, frail Marie in Act II. Harrison nails the pointillistic “Color and Light” and the dramatic “Finishing the Hat.” The ensemble songs – “It’s Hot Up Here” and all three “Sundays” – are passionately sung. For part of the time, we glimpse the orchestra, led by Mark Hartman, behind a scrim at the back of the stage, a nice touch.

And whether you’ve seen the original Seurat painting in books or in person – it’s huge, over 10 feet wide and 6 feet high, made up of millions of dots that somehow coalesce into a shimmering, sunlit image – you’ll never see it the same way again.

“Sunday in the Park With George” continues through Aug. 20. FMI and tickets (start at $34). 

The picks

Tonight (Thursday, June 29) and Friday at the White Page Gallery: BodyCartography Project Presents Olive Bieringa’s Felt Room. Part dance, part music, part installation – in the dark. Escape from a world of constant illumination in the “felt room,” where dancers move in and out. Leave screens behind, forget about time and let your imagination go. Bieringa is a dance maker, somatic movement therapist and cultural producer who grew up in New Zealand, studied in the Netherlands and Brooklyn, and teaches internationally. Thursday from 6-9 p.m., Friday from 7-10. Come for all or part of the time; arrive and depart when you like. Space is limited to 30. Reservations are essential. Email info@bodycartography.org to reserve. $10-20 suggested donation.

Silverback Trio
Courtesy of Silverback Trio
Silverback Trio

Tonight at the Bryant Lake Bowl Theater: Silverback Trio CD Release. David Hirsch (keyboards and saxophone), Brent Wallace (bass) and Byron Johnson-Blanchard (drums) have performed around town at places like the Aster, the Black Dog, Jazz Central and more. (You might have caught them at Golden’s Deli during Jazz Fest last weekend.) Their debut album is a high-energy fusion of jazz and rock, flavored with improvisation and occasionally slowing down for a thoughtful ballad. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show at 8. FMI and tickets ($8 advance, $10 door).

Tonight at the Heights: “Psycho.” On the big screen in a 35mm print courtesy of Universal. See it the way your parents or grandparents saw it. It is really, truly terrifying, and not because CGI. (Here’s something we learned from watching “Score: A Film Music Documentary”: When Bernard Herrmann added violins to the shower scene, he tricked us into thinking we were seeing more violence, and more skin, than we really were.) 7:30 p.m. FMI and tickets ($8).

Opens Friday at the Park Square: “Idiot’s Delight.” Girl Friday Productions, whose play this is, describes it as a “dramatic comedy about idealism, greed and the realities of war … set in a world on the brink.” Sounds contemporary, except Robert E. Sherwood’s play won the Pulitzer Prize … in 1936. Veteran director Craig Johnson leads a 17-member cast in what he calls one of the ‘big, sleek, well-constructed, entertaining yet thoughtful, limousine-like plays that Broadway produced in its heyday between the wars.” With John Middleton, Stacia Rice, Kory LaQuessa Pullam and Karen Wiese-Thompson. 7:30 p.m. FMI and tickets ($40/60). Ends July 23.

Saturday at the Mill City Museum: Minneapolis Riverfront Walking Tour. Ignored for decades, allowed to become an industrial wasteland when the local milling industry died, the Minneapolis riverfront – along the mighty Mississippi – is now hot property for living, entertaining and recreating. The tour covers the historic district at St. Anthony Falls, the Stone Arch Bridge, historic buildings and new developmens including the Guthrie, MacPhail and housing. About 1.5 miles of moderately paced walking on uneven surfaces. 10:30 a.m.-noon. FMI and tickets ($14/11 MNHS members). Also Sunday, Aug. 6, and Sunday, Sept. 17, 1-2:30 p.m.


          L'allée Loick Jemeur au complet   
La nouvelle allée du cimetière des blogs prend enfin son nom de baptême, l'allée Loick Jemeur.

Merci à tous pour vos votes, les blogs ci-dessous reposeront donc au calme à l'ombre d'un grand blogueur. ;-)

La troisième allée :
3_001: http://trelkubrations.canalblog.com/
3_002: http://civis.blog.lemonde.fr/
3_003: http://fr.netlog.com/czernebog
3_004: http://samanthazu.wordpress.com
3_005: http://petitboudha.canalblog.com/
3_006: http://blog.doctissimo.fr/undermyself/
3_007: http://rougetomate.blogspot.com/

Un plan du cimetière serait utile, les idées sont les bienvenues. Les outils de cartographie vont bientôt être utiles pour s'y retrouver dans ce dédale.

En attendant ne laisser pas votre blog à l'abandon, le cimetière reste ouvert.

Et n'hésiter pas également à proposer des noms pour les prochaines allées, sentes ou impasses du cimetière.
          The Torch - Peter Twohig (2015)   







Peter Twohig’s book The Cartographer (2012) hit the right note with book buyers and became a run-away popular fiction success. Set in the year 1959 in Richmond, a working class suburb of Melbourne, it featured an eleven year old boy who took shelter in the drains and lanes of the city to escape the man responsible for a murder he accidentally witnessed. The Torch begins shortly after the end of The Cartographer and the child protagonist is one year older and is, you guessed it, up to shenanigans in the drains and lanes of Richmond, this time seeking the kid known as Flame Boy before he, gasp, strikes again.

The Torch begins well enough, with the un-named protagonist (he refers to himself variously as The Spirit of Progress, The Railwayman, The Ferret and is called the Blayney Kid by most of the adults) having to move with his mother to his grandfather’s house due to their home having been burnt down by, you guessed it, Flame Boy. Unfortunately it’s not long before the flaws of this novel become all too apparent. There are a multitude of characters, literally hundreds; most are incidental and many are caricatures of what is supposed to be your typical Australian of 1960. As the book progresses there just seems to be no end to them, causing the principal characters to get lost in the general commotion. The Blayney Kid’s narration is chock full of Australian colloquialisms that are initially endearing, but soon become so irritating that the inward groaning starts to become audible. The attempt at giving the Blayney Kid some psychological depth with his angst over his twin brother’s death and his nascent romantic adventures fall flat. All the fires, car crashes and marauding criminals could have had more impact if the narrative had more tension, instead the same tone persists throughout. The rather flimsy plot, of which I do not wish to go into because, frankly, it’s just not worth it, is stretched out like an old rubbery elastic-band across the novel’s 457 pages. In the end, despite some faint hope, nothing truly significant is revealed and you look at your watch and think, my god I’m still alive (I’ll be putting in these blatant Bowie references for some time to come).

The Torch was selected by my library book club members, perhaps due to the success of The Cartographer, but at the meetings many were underwhelmed and disappointed and seemed to be enjoying their coffees much more than the book they had to trawl through. Perhaps if this shaggy dog tale had been more rigorously edited and had lost about half of its length it could’ve been a contender. The Torch came close to becoming only the second book on this blog to be rated as ‘reprehensible’, but it was saved by the fact that The Finkler Question was just so awful that other books have to try really hard to be its equal.


          Documentary reveals adventures of Ottoman sailor Piri Reis, Christopher Columbus   
A new documentary on famous Ottoman sailor and cartographer Piri Reis will reveal little known details of his life as well as his relations with Christopher Columbus
          The Cartographer of No Man's Land: A Novel   
cover image Duffy, P.S.
          Map Compass Rose North South East West Black Red Travel Cartography - Digital Image - Vintage Art Illustration by DigitaIDecades   

3.00 USD

Vintage Illustration Map Compass Rose - Digital Image

High resolution digital file available for immediate downloading

Image is about 4.5 x 5 inches - 300 dpi

You can make it fit your creative project

Digital Decades watermark does not appear on high resolution file

Image makes a great embellishment for all kinds of projects, like scrapbooking, labels, tags, cards, etc.


          Mapping No-Man’s-Land: The Official War Atlas of the 1st Division, A. E. F.   

This article originally appeared in slightly altered form in the Summer 2001 issue of “Virginia Cavalcade.”

 

The Official War Atlas of the 1st Division, American Expeditionary Force. Between 1928 and 1930, the federal government published the official records of the 1st Division, American Expeditionary Force (AEF). The Library of Virginia recently conserved an atlas that complements those twenty-four massive volumes. Maps are, of course, crucial in warfare, and these twenty-six base maps and forty-two overlays provide topographic documentation of portions of the American—and Virginian—involvement in World War I.

The federal government distributed the canvas-bound atlas with the 1st Division’s published records in the early 1930s. Army cartographers and engineers at Fort Humphreys, Virginia (now Fort Belvoir) and Fort DuPont, Delaware (now a state park), created the atlas using French Cartographic Service maps purchased in 1928. The army made the overlays with lithography and reproduced original maps with mimeographs. Numbers on the overlay maps correspond to coordinates on the base maps, allowing the researcher to see precise positions of enemy lines, mustard-gas concentrations, machine gun nests, and the like. The army cartographers characterized these maps and overlays as “exact reproductions of all available maps, sketches, charts, etc., showing all of the troop dispositions, operations, plans, situation reports, diagrams, [and] barrage charts…which have been found in the World War Records of the First Division.”

The maps nearly languished in obscurity in the Library’s archives storage. They came … read more »


          Mindomo Desktop   
Mindomo


Mindomo Desktop est votre logiciel de cartes mentales combinant de façon exclusive le travail hors-ligne avec la modification et la collaboration en ligne.

Vous n'avez pas besoin d'une connexion réseau pour créer vos cartes mentales et vos cartes conceptuelles. Une carte heuristique est un schéma, supposé refléter le fonctionnement de la pensée, qui permet de représenter visuellement et de suivre le cheminement associatif de la pensée.Cela permet de mettre en lumière les liens qui existent entre un concept ou une idée, et les informations qui leur sont associée.

Particularités :

- Cartographie mentale simplifiée
- Création de liste
- Conversion des cartes en présentations
- Licence autonome
- Thèmes de carte personnalisables
- Fonctionnalité de cartographie mentale
- Gestion de tâches avec les cartes mentales
- Fonctionnalité complète d'importation et exportation : Importez et exportez les cartes en tant que fichiers MindManager, Freemind, Mindmeister, XMind, Bubbl.us, PDF, Word, PowerPoint, Text, OPML, MPX, HTML, ZIP, PNG, XLS.
- Exportation PDF haute fidélité
- Historique de révision
- Hyperliens et pièces jointes
- Formatage de texte

La version gratuite est essentiellement limitée à 40 objets sur une carte.

Programme multilingue dont le français. Programme compatible Windows, Mac et Linux.

Site de l'application

Télécharger ici



          Google Maps vs OpenStreetMap   

Some of the cartographers on the OpenStreetMap project (which includes the chair of the Society of Cartographers in the UK) got together a few weekends ago for a cartography discussion day to try and clean up the rendering of free geodata from the project. The results of that day are now starting to appear on the maps, with much of the extraneous detail being stripped until you zoom further in, revealing more on each zoom level so as not to clutter the smaller scale maps.

With the changing of the maps I wanted to see how the Isle of Man was looking. I have to say, it's looking even better than the previous big update to mapping.

When I first learned about OpenStreetMap at the Open Geodata Forum I wasn't entirely convinced it would take off, though I was intrigued by the concept. Almost two years down the line and my opinions have definitely changed on that, as have the opinions of many others, including people in the geographic information industry.

To see why my opinions have changed, just compare the open street map of the Isle of Man to the Google Maps version which shows nothing except its name and an outline of the Island (with the Calf of Man joined at the bottom as if a bridge had been built to the islet).

With open geodata anyone can just go in and add new information or alter existing information if there are errors in it (like the link between the Calf and the mainland, for example) but you can't do that on Google Maps. Admittedly the Manx map is still somewhat lacking in certain areas, but it's a work in progress and it's getting there, slowly.

1 ©2007 Google, TeleAtlas, used under fair dealing clause

2 ©2007 individual contributors, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license

          Russian 1:500,000 mapping of the Isle of Man   

isleofman-russian500k.jpg

Before the fall of the Soviet Union, they put a lot of energy into mapping the rest of the world, at small scales like the section of map above, but also at larger scales for certain places of key interest to the Soviet government at the time.

The more detailed larger scale maps were deemed by the Ordnance Survey to be copies of British mapping and so although the maps are copyright free (Russia didn't believe in copyright when these maps were being produced) it is questionable as to whether they can be reused in the UK*.

isleofman-russian500k-crop.jpgYou can read much fascinating information about Soviet mapping on John Davies' Soviet Military Maps of Britain site, but I just wanted to share this interesting Soviet cartography of the Isle of Man with names transposed into Russian.

The original map image is available from the Poehali website.

* The OS specifically call out 1:25000, 1:50000 and 1:100000 mapping, so I hope posting this 1:500000 map extract of the Isle of Man won't cause any problems.


          An apology for communism: The invisible committee’s Now   

From Autonomies

I am large, I contain multitudes.

Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

The real problem is not that of restoring a Marxist or Leninist or Maoist truth, nor that of remaking an organisation with the same methods and therefore the same errors as the one that failed in too many parts of the world. The half century that has passed since the death of Lenin obliges us, on pain of death, to rethink reality, not texts; society, not formulae; to produce truth, not to contend over hereditary protocols. It is a difficult task that for a number of years has demanded fierce study and pitiless rigour. Nor is it just a task of consciousness. It is a vital task, in which to invent a different relationship between our present, the site of our pain and our joy, and the exalted or terrifying images of the future and the past.

Franco Fortini

What follows is a fourth and final exercise in the sharing of ideas, of visions (for the first, click here, the second, here, and the third, here). The most recent essay by the invisible committee, Now, continues a reflection-intervention that began with The Coming Insurrection and To Our Friends, and offers a powerful critique of contemporary politics, along with a defense of “autonomy”. What is proposed here then is again a partial translation, summary and critical commentary on their reading of communism.

Everywhere, we are proposed solutions

“Cities in transition, social and solidarity economies, a 6th Republic, alternative municipalism, basic universal income, the film Tomorrow, migrations into space, a thousand new prisons, expelling all foreigners from the planet, man-machine fusions – whether they be engineers, managers, activists, politicians, ecologists, actors or simple hucksters, all of those who pretend to offer solutions to the present disaster do but one thing: they impose upon us their definition of the problem, in the hope of having us forget that they are themselves clearly part of the problem. As one friend stated: ‘The solution to the problem that you see in life is a way of living that makes the problem disappear.'” (123-4)*

The invisible committee offers us no political program, no solution for sale. They speak from their singular experience, their encounters, their successes and failures. From this, they “draw an evidently partisan perception of the world, which conversation between friends refines”. (124) It is then for each one of us, as readers of Maintenant/Now, to draw the consequences. And it is with this in the background that one may speak of a defence of communism.

The question of communism remains at the heart of our epoch, if for no other reason than that the reign of its opposite, the economy, has never been so complete. (124)

“One can of course elude the question of communism. One can accustom oneself to stepping over the homeless or the migrants on the street each morning on the way to the office. One can follow in real time time the melting of the polar icecaps, the rise of the oceans or frantic migrations, in all directions, of animals and human beings. One can continue to prepare one’s cancer each time one swallows a fork of mashed food. One can say that the recovery, a little authority or eco-feminism will resolve all that. To continue in this way is at the price of repressing in ourselves the sentiment of living in an intrinsically criminal society, and who does not miss the opportunity to remind us that we are a part of this little criminal association. Each time that we enter into contact with it – by the use of anyone of its devices, the consumption of the least of its commodities or the job that we slave on for it -, we make ourselves its accomplices, we contract a little of the vice that grounds it: that of exploiting, pillaging, exhausting the very conditions of all terrestrial existence. We have the choice but between two crimes: that of participating or that of deserting with the aim of killing it. The hunt for the criminal, the thirst for punishment and judgement is frenzied in our time only to the extent of procuring for the spectator, for an instant, a surrogate of innocence. But as the relief is of short duration, it is necessary to continually begin anew to blame, to punish, to accuse – so as to clear oneself of responsibility.” (124-5)

If to speak of communism sounds grossly anachronistic in our times, it is because it was, in the 20th century, misconceived as a social doctrine, which is to say, as a response to a strictly human concern. (127)

“Despite that, it has never ceased to inform the world. If it continues to haunt it, it is because it does not proceed from any ideological fixation, but from a fundamental, immemorial, lived experience: that of community, which revokes so many economic axioms, as well as beautiful constructions of civilisation. There is never community as an entity, but only as an experience. It is that of the continuity with beings and with the world. In love, friendship, we have the experience of this continuity.” (127)

There is a lived experience of communism in moments of giving, sharing, friendship; a singular experience of creative interaction with others and the world. It is only by divorcing the human being from this experience that communism could come to be imagined as an emaciated, abstract fraternalism, an empty internationlism, to be appropriated and corrupted by political movements, parties and States. But what is communism if not friendship, equality among friends?

“In taking the human subject in isolation from her/his world, in detaching mortals from all that lives around them, modernity could not but give birth to a communism exterminator of a socialism. And this socialism could not encounter peasants, nomads and “savages” except as obstacles to be swept away, like an annoying residue at the bottom of national accounting. They could not even see what communism they were the bearers of. If modern “communism” was able to imagine itself as universal fraternity, as realised equality, it was by cavalierly extrapolating the lived fact of fraternity in struggle from friendship. For what is friendship if not the equality between friends?” (128-9)

“Without the experience, even occasional, of communism, we die, we shrivel up, we becomes cynics, hard, barren. Life is this phantom-city peopled by smiling mannequins, and that works. Our need for community is so pressing that after having ravaged all existing ties, capitalism can only run on the promise of “community”. What are the social networks, dating applications, if not this promise perpetually disappointed? What are all of the fashions, the technologies of communication, all the love songs, except a way of maintaining the dream of a continuity between beings where, in the end, all contact is stolen away? This promise of frustrated community opportunely redoubles the need for it. It is rendered even hysterical, and turns ever faster the great cash machine of those who exploit it. To maintain the poverty and have it show itself in one possible outcome, this is the great strength of capitalism.” (129)

The capitalist economy rests upon two complicit fictions, that of “society” and of the “individual”, and all that they carry with them, politically, morally, existentially. And even those opposed to it, for example, anarchists and marxists, often do little more than play ping-pong around this couple, “without worrying themselves that this false antinomy was fashioned by economic thought.” (131)

“To rebel against society in the name of the individual or against individualism in the name of socialism, is to condemn oneself in advance. The individual and society have not ceased, for a good three centuries, to affirm themselves at the expense of the other, and it is this well established and oscillating apparatus that, from year to year, keeps the lovely spools called “the economy” turning. Contrary to what the economy wants us to see, what there is in life are not individuals endowed with all kinds of properties that they may use or separate themselves from. What there is in life are attachments, assemblages, of situated beings who move in a whole ensemble of ties. In making its own the liberal fiction of the individual, modern ” communism” could not but confound property and attachment, and carry with itself the devastation even to where it thought it was struggling against private property and constructing socialism. … It was only on the basis of such a confusion that one could imagine that “Humanity” could exist, that is all women and men similarly torn away from what weaves their specific existence, and phantasmagorically reunited in an great untraceable machine. In massacring all of the attachments that make up the very texture of worlds, under the pretext of abolishing the private ownership of the means of production, modern “communism” effectively made a clean slate – of everything. This is then what occurs to those who practice economics, even in criticising it. ‘One had not to criticise the economy, one had to get out of it!’, Lyotard would have said. Communism is not a ‘superior economic organisation of society’, but the destitution of the economy.” (131-3)

What appears under the spectacle economy from the outside as an “indivdual” is in truth a complex of heterogeneous forces, an aggregate of fragments capable and susceptible to agencies. We are each, many lives, many faces, and what ties we create and are created are not between separate entities, but between and within the confluence of fragmentary flows.

“We are not beautiful, complete egos, well unified Selves; we are composed of fragments, we swarm with minor lives. … Every tie between beings goes from a fragment of being to a fragment of being, from a fragment of world to a fragment of world. It establishes itself below and beyond the level of the individual. It immediately effects [“agence”] between them portions of beings that suddenly discover themselves on an equal footing, experience themselves as continuous. This continuity between fragments is what is felt as “community”, an assemblage. It is what we experience in every true encounter. Every encounter cuts a part of us away, where are indistinctly mixed elements of the world, of the other and of ourselves. Love does not put individuals into relationship with each other; it rather cuts away a part in each, as if they were suddenly traversed by a special plane of reality, where they find themselves walking together in the world. To love is never to be together, but to become together. If to love did not unmake the fictitious unity of being, the “other” would be incapable of making us suffer so. If in love a part of the other was not to be found as a part of us, we would not have to mourn when the hour of separation comes. If there were nothing but relations between beings, no one would understand themselves. Everything would move along with misunderstanding. There is neither subject nor object of love, there is an experience of love.” (138)

“The fragments which constitute us, the forces that inhabit us, the assemblages where we enter have no reason to compose a harmonious whole, a fluid ensemble, a mobile articulation. The banal experience of life, of our days, is rather that of a succession of encounters which gradually unmake us, fragment us, progressively steal away from us all certain foundations. If communism has to do with the fact of organising ourselves collectively, materially, politically, it is to the exact degree that it signifies also organising ourselves singularly, existentially, sensibly. Or, one must accept falling back into politics or the economy. If communism has an end, it is the great well-being of forms of life. The great well-being is gained, in contact with life, through the patient articulation of the disjointed members of our being. One can very well live one’s entire life without experiencing anything, by being careful not to feel or think. Existence is thus brought to a slow movement of degradation. It uses and damages, instead of giving form. Relations, past the miracle of the encounter, cannot but go from injury to injury towards their consummation. Conversely, s/he who refuses to live next to oneself, who accepts to experience, life gives them progressively form. S/he becomes in the full sense of the term a form of life.” (138-9)

“Poles apart from this are the inherited methods of activist construction, so fatiguing, so destructive, when they wanted to build so much. Communism is played out not in the renunciation of self, but in attention to the simplest gesture. It is a question of the plane of perception and thus in the way things are done. It is a practical question. What the perception of entities – individual or collective – bars our access to, is the plane where things really happen, the plane where collective potentialities are made and unmade, reinforce or unravel themselves. It is on this plane and only there that the real, including the politically real, becomes readable and makes sense. To live communism, is not to work to make exist the entity to which one adheres, but to deploy and deepen an ensemble of ties, which is to say to sometimes cut them. What is essential takes place at the level of the very small. For the communist, the world of important facts extends beyond sight. It is the whole alternative between the individual and the collective that perception in terms of ties revokes positively. An ‘I’ that, in a given situation, rings true can be a “we” of exceptional potential. Equally, the happiness proper to every Commune refers to a plenitude of singularities, to a certain quality of ties, to the radiance at its heart of each fragment of the world – the end of entities, of their weight, the end of individual and collective confinements, the end of the reign of narcissism. ‘The only and unique progress, wrote the poet Franco Fortini, consists and will consist of reaching a higher place, visible, seeing, where it will be possible to promote the potentialities and the qualities of each singular existence.’ What is to be deserted is not ‘society’ nor ‘individual life’, but the couple that they form together. We must learn how to move on another plane.” (139-40)

[Gloss: Let us imagine human existence in its four dimensions of space and time. What any State endeavours to do is to render its subjects transparent. For this, it must map them. The cartographer’s question is then what “geographical” projection to employ. The human must be, so to speak, flattened out. But as with any such projection, the mapping is eminently political, with those territories that are deemed fundamental for control being given prominence. What contemporary capitalism accomplishes, to a degree unheard of, by means of technological apparatuses of surveillance, control and seduction, is to fragment the subject into a multiplicity of measurable domains, each the object of political and economic investment. Without by any means exhausting the map, we are biochemical measures of cholesterol, sugar, heartbeat; corporal measures of size and shape, volume and weight; emotional and cognitive measures of stability and intelligence; psychological, social and cultural measures of functionality, productivity, ethnicity; political measures of identification and participation, and so on. In each instance, each field is observed, studied, recorded, and always restrained and seduced. The micro-administration of capital is totalitarian in its ambition and it is this potentially inexhaustible reality that capitalism as a system of social relations is able to mould and exploit.

What opposition there can be to capitalism must begin here. And paradoxically, in so fragmenting the human subject, what capitalism accomplishes is the simultaneous revelation of the illusion of a sovereign subjectivity. As fragmentation is intensified for ever greater control, cracks appear, we leak through the fissures, and subjectivities encounter other subjective singularities, generating experiences that defy control.

Communism in some sense can be said to be the ethical acknowledgement and shaping of life within the flux of movements of capital. That is, it shows up a truth, the truth that we are always “between” realities, in the thresholds of corporal, affective and cognitive shifts. Capitalism’s capacity to exploit these movements depends upon self-interested, temporary territorialisations, on perpetuating therefore the illusion that all is stable, and that it is in stability where prosperous well-being is to be found. What radical anti-capitalism must strive towards is challenging capitalist territorialisations, thereby creating spaces and times for potential collective creativity beyond capital, within the multiple fluxes that exist between ever changing subjectivities.]

What capitalism cannot tolerate is the freedom of feeling, seeing, understanding, none of which are politically indifferent, nor equitably shared among us. We are obliged to remain at the surface of experience, of life, in contemporary social relations; even led to fear the risks of engagement, commitment, “loss of control” (when we already control very little). “If the whole social circus continues still, it is because each wears themselves out keeping their head above water, when instead, what would be necessary is to embrace the fall until we touch something solid”. (146)

In struggle, in true collective life where we open ourselves up to create together, our feelings and thoughts change profoundly. However banal this may sound – and it only sounds as such because language has itself become so banal, so empty – we are no longer the same subjects, we become other than what we were before we lived such experiences of shared creativity. We come back to Fortini’s vision, and we can begin to speak of communism as a way of seeing that carries with it a way of being in the world that breaks with the power of economy.

“There is no sense in sharing things if one does not begin by communising the aptitude to see. Without that, to live communism is similar to a wild dance in absolute darkness: we crash, we injure, we drape the soul and body in blues, without even wanting to and without even knowing precisely whom we should hold something against. To add the capacity to see to everyone in all domains, to compose new perceptions and to refine them to infinity, that is the central object of all communist development, the growth of immediate potential that it determines. Those who wish to see nothing cannot but produce collective disasters. One has to make oneself see [clairvoyant, a visionary], for oneself as much as for others.” (148)

“Because it is a matter … of life itself, the true communist question is not ‘how to produce?’, but ‘how to live?’. Communism is the centrality of the old ethical question, that which historical socialism held to be ‘metaphysical’, ‘premature’ or ‘petite-bourgeois’, and not that of labour. It is general de-totalisation, and not the socialisation of everything.” (150)

“For us, communism is not a goal. There is no ‘transition’ towards it. It is entirely transition: it is on the way. The different ways of inhabiting the world will never cease to cross each other, to crash into each other and, at times, to combat each other. Everything will always have to be taken up again.” (151)

By way of conclusion, with the words of the poet Franco Fortini …

“Communism is the material process that aims to make the materiality of so-called spiritual things both sensible and intellectual. To the point of being able to read in the book of our own body everything that men did and were under the sovereignty of time; and to interpret in it the traces of the passage of the human species over an earth on which it will leave no trace.”

Franco Fortini, “Che cos’è il comunismo”

L’Internazionale di Franco Fortini (Versione del Coro Ingrato) …

Noi siamo gli ultimi del mondo.
Ma questo mondo non ci avrà.
Noi lo distruggeremo a fondo.
Spezzeremo la società.
Nelle fabbriche il capitale
come macchine ci usò.
Nelle scuole la morale
di chi comanda ci insegnò.

Questo pugno che sale
questo canto che va
è l’Internazionale
un’altra umanità.
Questa lotta che uguale
l’uomo all’uomo farà,
è l’Internazionale.
Fu vinta e vincerà.

Noi siamo gli ultimi di un tempo
che nel suo male sparirà.
Qui l’avvenire è già presente
chi ha compagni non morirà.
Al profitto e al suo volere
tutto l’uomo si tradì,
ma la Comune avrà il potere.
Dov’era il no faremo il sì.

Questo pugno che sale…

E tra di noi divideremo
lavoro, amore, libertà.
E insieme ci riprenderemo
la parola e la verità.
Guarda in viso, tienili a memoria
chi ci uccise, chi mentì.
Compagni, porta la tua storia
alla certezza che ci unì.

Questo pugno che sale…

Noi non vogliam sperare niente.
il nostro sogno è la realtà.
Da continente a continente
questa terra ci basterà.
Classi e secoli ci han straziato
fra chi sfruttava e chi servì:
compagno, esci dal passato
verso il compagno che ne uscì.

Questo pugno che sale…

_________

*Unless otherwise indicated, all references are to the essay Maintenant, published by La fabrique, 2017.

    category: 

              1st International Conference of Anarchist Geographies and Geographers (ICAGG) – Geography, social change and antiauthoritarian practices    

    From ICAGG

    1st International Conference of Anarchist Geographies and Geographers (ICAGG) – Geography, social change and antiauthoritarian practices

    Reggio Emilia (Italy) – Centro Studi Cucine del Popolo, via Beethoven 78/e, 21-23 September 2017 – http://www.cucine.arealibertaria.org/

    In the last years, an outstanding international and multilingual rediscovery of anarchist geographers has occurred at the level both of academics and of grassroots movements, drawing at the same time on a renewed interest for historical figures like Pyotr Kropotkin (1842-1921) and Elisée Reclus (1830-1905), and on the contributions of anarchist and antiauthoritarian ideas and practices to present-day struggles for social liberation worldwide. Special issues on anarchism and geography have been published by outstanding international journals, such as Antipode and ACME, leading to a flourishing of recent papers and books on these topics, including the organisation of successful sessions on anarchist geographies at the most widely attended geographic international conferences, such as the RGS-IBG, the AAG and the IGU, and for the international conferences of the Anarchist Studies Network. An international mailing list of anarchist geographies has also been inaugurated.

    In the French-speaking circuits, a flourishing of grassroots initiatives and scholarly research has likewise taken place, leading to the foundation of a network of anarchist geographers (Réseau de géographes libertaires), which organises a number of periodic conferences and workshops in France and Switzerland, and contributes to two important annual festivals targeting the communication between scholars and wider publics in France. The first, Les Reclusiennes, takes place in Sainte-Foy-la-Grande, the town of origin of Elisée Reclus, and the second, the Festival International de la Géographie in Saint-Dié-des-Vosges, includes an anarchist-driven Forum of Critical Geographies. In South America, conferences and public courses on anarchist geographies are periodically organised, mainly in Brazil, by the networks of ReKro-Rede Reclus-Kropotkin de Estudos Libertários and the Anarchist Library Terra Livre, in collaboration with universities like UFRJ and USP. This list could continue, but it is just a sample of the rich and cosmopolite field in which the present-day debates in anarchist geographies are developing.

    In light of the flourishing of anarchist geographies, we propose to organize an independent international conference, to be repeated in different countries every 2 or 3 years, to create a space for scholars and militants interested in these topics to enjoy a deep and fruitful exchange, and present an opportunity for those interested in anarchist geographies and rooted in broader social movements internationally to exchange ideas and make meaningful connections’. The choice of doing the first conference in an Italian small town like Reggio Emilia, where an established local anarchist movement already promoted events and publications on anarchist geographers is instrumental to the capital tasks of continuing a discussion among scholars and militants from different linguistic and cultural areas, and ensuring discussions involve grassroots movements and militant situations outside the academy.

    This conference is not only for “card-carrying” anarchists. We welcome contributions dealing critically with anarchist geographies, histories, concepts, and interventions from grassroots movements, militants, and academics.

    We invite especially, but not exclusively, critical anarchic geographical contributions on:

        • What are anarchist geographies and what are their tasks?

          Which relations between anarchism and the most current critical/theoretical approaches used in geographical scholarship, i.e. postmodernism and post-structuralism, critical modernities, post-colonialism, more-than-human geographies, actor-network theory, non-representational theories, feminism, gender and queer theories, Marxism, critical race theory, intersectionality, qualitative and quantitative methods etc.?

      • Problematizing the relations between anarchism, rationalism, Enlightenment and modernity.

    • Anarchist geographies and counter-cartography. Maps and spaces of liberation.

    • Anarchist geographies and Indigenous movements.

    • Anarchism and the environment: mesology, natural philosophies and the idea of progress.

    • Anarchist geographies in practice: experiences from grassroots movements, local and international struggles, histories and geographies of resistance.

    • Anti-statist, post-statist and not statist geographies: anarchism and the idea of territory.

    • Anarchism, federalism and the concept of geographical scale: cities, regions and the global.

    • Anti-racist, anti-colonial and internationalist geographies.

    • Anarchist geographies, cosmopolitanism and multilingualism: which challenges to nationalist and parochial academies?

    • Anarchism and geographies of war and peace.

    • Anarchism and geographies of violence and non-violence.

    • Anarchist geographies of education and de-schooling.

    • Geographies of secularisation and free-thinking.

    • Anarchist geopolitics.

    • Historical geographies of anarchism.

    • Anarchist geographies and geographers in the history and philosophy of geography.

    • Historical figures of anarchist geographers and their interdisciplinary connections: histories of transnational anarchism, anarchist anthropologies, political theory and political philosophy.

    To attend the conference, please send an abstract of maximum 250 words at the address scientific_committee@icagg.org by February 1st 2017. The preferred conference’s language is English: if you feel especially uncomfortable with presenting in this language, please write to the organisers in order to arrange some specific solution. Further information will be provided by e-mail and through the site www.icagg.org

    Practical information: For information on travel, accommodation and any other practical query (need for childcare, dietary requirements etc.), please write to icagg2017@icagg.org

    Scientific and Promoting Committee:

    Gerónimo Barrera

    Béatrice Collignon

    Amir El-Hakim

    Fabrizio Eva

    Federico Ferretti

    Anthony Ince

    Marcelo Lopes de Souza

    Patrick Minder

    Joanne Norcup

    Philippe Pelletier

    Marcella Schmidt di Friedberg

    Adriano Skoda

    Vanessa Sloan Morgan

    Simon Springer

    Francisco Toro

    Gian Maria Valent

    Richard White

    Patricia Wood

    Local organisation committee:

    Eliana Bartoli

    Arturo Bertoldi

    Lorenzo Coniglione

    Fabio Dolci

    Andrea Ferrari

    Simone Ruini

    Gian Maria Valent

    category: 

              Become A Cartographer   

    One of the hottest jobs in the 2000s is a cartographer. No need to know who Anaximander is, but you might intend to pursue a spatial science background. If you like map making, then you can do what you love, you can make a decent salary, and you will be in demand! According to Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence, a report from the National Research Council, "Future shortages in cartography, photogrammetry, and geodesy seem likely because the number of graduates is too small (tens to hundreds) to give NGA choices or means of meeting sudden demand." That being said, would you like a more thorough definition of what cartography is and what it means to be a cartographer today in the planetary sciences? Randy Kirk, a brilliant geophysicist and cartographer, now working in a scientist emeritus capacity, discusses cartographic work today. Get the inside scoop and become more acquainted with cartography.

     

    Titan

    Credit: NASA

    Excerpt: " The dictionary definition of cartography, “the science or art of making maps” [1] succeeds or fails on the breadth of one’s definition of a “map”. Printed maps and globes, the traditional examples, are still useful but have mostly been supplanted by digital and increasingly more dynamic products. The use of “cartography” as a blanket term in the NASA planetary exploration community is arguably a historical accident, related to the establishment of oversight and planning groups beginning with the Lunar Photography and Cartography Committee in 1974 and evolving into the Planetary Cartography and Geologic Mapping Working Group (PCGMWG) by 1994 [2]. Through the lunar/planetary cartography program overseen by these groups, NASA recognized its need for a wide range of spatial data products to support scientific research, generated by an evolving mix of technologies evolving from photographic processing, airbrush artistry, and analytical photogrammetry [3] toward an increasingly integrated set of solutions for processing, organizing and presenting spatial data in digital form. Perhaps unfortunately, the narrow term “cartography” remained in use as a cover for this evolving program over several decades. Yet, it would be equally naïve to define planetary cartography as “the activity of NASA’s planetary cartography program”. Not only does this leave out the crucial contributions of other national and international space agencies, it fails to recognize that a great deal of the work is done by missions (e.g., characterization, geometric and radiometric calibration of instruments by the teams of experts that developed them, implementation of data processing pipelines, and production of first if not always final drafts of key map products), as well as by investigators funded by other research and analysis programs."

     

    Read more of Randy's abstract
              Persuasive cartography: an interview with map collector PJ Mode   
    Persuasive Cartography: The PJ Mode Collection is a physical and digital collection of maps donated to Cornell University Library’s Rare and Manuscript Collections. It brings together maps from many eras from all over the world to explore their power as visual messengers. The collection is freely accessible in Shared Shelf Commons and through its own website, which leverages […]
                 
    Vocabulary List
    Basic Design 2
    Introduction to three-dimensional design
    Professor Stephen Robison

    Abstract: Referring to art that simplifies, emphasizes, or distorts qualities of a real life image, often in order to present the essence of that image.

    Abstract Expressionism: American art movement of the 1960s which synthesized European Modernism with America’s post-WWII social and cultural emergence. Characterized by bold expressionistic abstraction always communicating the actions of the artist in addition to any other narrative. Jackson Pollack, Lee Krasner, Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Franz Kline.

    Academic Art: Term applied to any kind of art that uses established rules for technique and form organization.

    Achromatic: Without color; characterized by black, white, and/or gray.

    Activated Space: The space controlled or energized by a 3-D piece.

    Additive Color Mixing: color mixing in light, where each additional color increases light energy, and all the combined colors give white light. See subtractive color mixing.

    Additive Sculpture: Sculpture made by putting pieces together.

    Allegorical: Using figure or emblem to stand for theme or idea.

    Alignment: Arrangement along an axis.

    Alternative Space: Non-traditional space used for exhibition of artwork.

    Amorphous: Without definite form; lacking in structure.

    Analogous Colors: Hues lying adjacent on the color wheel, often used together in color schemes.

    Anthropomorphism: Giving human- or animal-like qualities to inanimate objects.

    Applied Arts: The disciplines in which functional objects are created.

    Applied Color: Color added to the surface, rather than the local color of the material itself.

    Appropriation: the use of existing imagery not created by the artist in order to communicate a new idea.

    Armature: A simple wood or wire inner skeleton providing support for modeling in a plastic material such as clay or wax.

    Art Deco: Art movement in the early 20th century featuring machine-like forms and surfaces.

    Art for Art's Sake: The essential credo of Modernism, implying that art need not serve to communicate a recognizable narrative, but can be made purely to enliven or activate a plane or space.

    Art Nouveau: 19th century art movement featuring curvilinear design often featuring plant motifs.

    Articulate: To connect or juxtapose shapes or forms logically.

    Assemblage: A 3-D artwork made from found objects.

    Asymmetrical Balance: Balance achieved by different visual elements which command similar visual emphasis.

    Automatism: Closely associated with Surrealism, art which is created subjectively and/or randomly without imposition of the artist’s rational thought process.

    Axis: A conceptual straight line indicated by the dominant linear concentration of shapes or forms in a group, or by implied direction of movement.

    Avant Garde: French term meaning "out front," used in art in reference to conceptually innovative work.

    Balance: Quality of stability and equilibrium controlled by location and emphasis of major parts of a design.

    Bauhaus: Design school founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar, Germany in 1919, emphasizing clean, minimal design. Drew its inspiration from the philosophy of William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement that there should be no distinction between fine arts and applied arts. Bauhaus was forced to close by Hitler and many of those involved emigrated to the U.S.

    Biomorphic: Shapes and forms associated with those found in nature, non-linear. See organic.

    Buoyancy: Impression of physical lightness or upward movement in a work.

    Cantilever: An object which projects horizontally into space, supported at only one end.

    Classical: Referring to the art and culture of ancient Greece or Rome; referring to any style of art in its period of maximum perfection; referring to art based on order and proportion rather than on expressiveness and emotion.

    Closed Form: A relatively solid form with little negative space.

    Color-Field Painting: 1950s movement emphasizing broad fields of color. See Post-Painterly Abstraction. Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland.

    Color Vibration: Perceptual phenomenon of vibration or movement along the contact line between two highly-contrasting colors.

    Color Wheel: In color theory, circular chart showing primary, secondary, complimentary colors.

    Complimentary Colors: Colors opposite one another on the color wheel - red/green, orange/blue, yellow/purple.

    Composition: The arrangement or structuring of various elements.

    Conceptual Art: Works or events where idea is more important than visual form.

    Confined Space: A spatial field with clearly defined enclosing boundaries.

    Constructivism: The reduction of two or three-dimensional art to abstract geometrical essentials. An international style which gained its greatest momentum in 1920s Russia. Archipenko, Rodchenko, Tatlin, Gabo, Moholy-Nagy.

    Content: The subject matter of a work, plus its intellectual, symbolic, spiritual, and/or narrative implications, as opposed to physical form.

    Contour: The outline of an object.

    Contrast: The interaction of areas dissimilar in color, value, shape, texture, size, etc.

    Cool Colors: Hues in the green and blue range.

    Cubism: An early 20th century art movement originating in France in 1907, characterized by reduction of realistic form to abstract planes, often portraying several views of an object at once. Divided into analytical cubism, abstracted om response to the actual form and surface of an object or scene, and synthetic cubism, invented from the imagination in order to create a composition (may still be objective). Picasso, Braque, Leger, Duchamp.

    Curvilinear: Stressing use of curved lines, as opposed to rectilinear which stresses straight lines.

    Dada; Dadaism: An international style of anti-rational, anti-aesthetic art which was very active from about 1915 to 1923, playing upon the absurd and inhumane environment of the post-WWI machine age. Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Frances Picabia, Beatrice Wood.

    Deconstruction; Deconstructionism: The practice of interpreting meaning in a art by intellectually and philosophically dismantling image and meaning into component parts, systematically revealing hidden message or meaning.

    Decorative: Art characterized primarily by pleasing appearance rather than strength of narrative; visual treatment that embellishes a surface.

    Delineated Space: In 3-D works, negative space or unfilled areas described or delineated by positive shapes or filled areas.

    Direction: The line (actual or implied) along which an object or element seems to be pointing or moving.

    Directional Line or Shape: Line or shape with a clearly perceived sense of direction, guiding the viewer’s eye along a visual path.

    Discordant Colors: Outmoded term referring to use of a color with those adjacent to its compliment (see complimentary colors). Once considered inappropriate, now often used for emphasis or attention.

    Documentation: In contemporary art, the surviving documented record of a remote, inaccessible, or transitory art installation or a performance art event.

    Dynamic Form: Form that conveys a sense of movement or change.
    Earth Art or Environmental Art: Art movement beginning in the 1960s which rejected the commercialization of art while embracing ecological concerns, primarily in installation art involving the outdoor environment. Christo, Alice Aycock, Robert Smithson, Michael Heizer, Nancy Holt, Alan Sonfist.

    Economy: Deletion of nonessential details to reveal the essence of a form.

    Emphasis: Use of design elements to concentrate visual attention on particular areas or elements.

    Environmental Art: see Earth Art.

    Ergonomics: The study of how people relate physically to their living environment; the study of how to make manufactured products physically user-friendly.

    Expressionism: Art that puts primary emphasis on the expression of emotional and psychological content. First emerged in late 19th and early 20th century with European artists like Edvard Munch, Emil Nolde, James Ensor, Oskar Kokoshka, Kathe Kollwitz, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Vassily Kandinsky, George Roualt.
    Fabrication: Assembling and attaching of rigid materials in creation of sculptural form.

    Figurative: Art that is representational rather than abstract; art representing human or animal forms.

    Figure/Ground: Terms generally used in 2-D art, parallel to positive/negative space, referring to the relationship between foreground object(s) or element(s) as figure, and the background field or surrounding space or ground.

    Fluxus: A 1960s art movement growing out of the Dada movement, emphasizing reexamination of the parameters of art, often with unconventional or absurd installation or performance art activities.

    Focal Point: The primary area or point in a work to which the eye is drawn.

    Folk Art: Art arising from rural folk traditions. Traditionally considered low art, but now a major component of mainstream art and outsider art.

    Form: The volume and shape of a three-dimensional object, or the illusion of volume in a two-dimensional work; the overall physical aspects of a work, as opposed to its content.

    Formal: Having to do with the design structure of a work without consideration of the content or recognizable subject matter.

    Formalism: Theory or art that deals only with formal elements.

    Found Objects: Objects or materials not created as art materials but used in a work of art.

    Frontal: 3-D works which invite observation and appreciation primarily from one vantage point, as compared to half-round or full-round.

    Full-Round - 3-D works which invite observation and appreciation from all directions.

    Gestalt: The sum total effect of a work of art, combining the visual appearance, physical presence, objective narrative, and subjective psychological and emotional impact.

    Gesture: Arrangements of design elements creating expressive or evocative association with movements and poses of the human figure.

    Graffiti Art: Art movement beginning in 1970s inspired by New York City subway graffiti. In Italian, graffiti literally means scratches on the wall. Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Lee Quinones.

    Graphic Impact: Attention-getting quality of a work, often dependent on high-contrast color or value.

    Ground: Background or surface upon which marks or shapes are created.

    Grouping: In perception, the tendency to search for connections and similarities between objects in proximity. In design, the attempt to establish those connections and similarities which add to a coherent whole.

    Half-Round: 3-D works which invite observation and attention within a 180-degree field of view.

    Happening: Subcategory of Pop Art - early 1960s performance art events, primarily in New York City, involving interaction of artist and audience, addressing everyday life activities, and often incorporating multi-media effects.

    Hard-Edge: Art characterized by clearly-defined sharp-edged lines and shapes.

    High Art: Traditionally refers to "fine art" such as painting, sculpture, classical music, classical theater, etc.

    High Relief: 3-D form rising considerably off a flat background.

    Highlight: A point or area characterized by brightness of color, value, or direct reflected light.

    Hue: The actual name of a color, such as red, orange, blue, etc.

    Icon: Greek for "image." In historic art, sacred paintings of the Greek Orthodox Church. In contemporary terms, any art image or object expressing basic values of the culture; any art image or object that creates the impression of being expressive of basic values of a non-specific culture.

    Iconic: Art having the quality of an icon.

    Idealized: In art, attempting some imagined rather than actual level of perfection.

    Illusion: Appearance that is contrary to fact.

    Implied Line, Plane, Shape, or Form: Suggested to the eye but not actually present.

    Installation: Artform arising in its modern form in the 1970s, featuring site-specific work that creates a complete ensemble or environment to be experienced by the viewer. Judy Pfaff, Terry Allen, Joseph Beuys, Christian Boltanski, Jonathan Borofsky, Hans Haacke, Nam June Paik, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Bill Viola, Lucas Samaras, Edward Kienholz.

    Intent: The central idea or problem that an artist or designer is trying to deal with.

    Interior Form: The internal shape described by a hollow work of art.

    Junk Sculpture: Assemblage fashioned from castoff products of our society, often mechanical or industrial debris. Appeared first in 1920s and 30s in Picasso, Braque, Julio Gonzales, Marcel Duchamp, and Kurt Schwitters. Gained momentum in 50s in Europe and America. Lee Bonticou, John Chamberlain, Eduardo Paolozzi, Robert Rauschenberg, Richard Stankiewicz, Jean Tinguely.

    Juxtaposition: Adjacent placement of visual elements.

    Kinetic Art: Two and three-dimensional artworks incorporating virtual or real movement. Pol Bury, Jean Tinguely, Alexander Calder, Yaacov Agam, George Rickey.

    Kitsch: The tacky, low-art artifacts of everyday life, such as Eiffel Tower lamps, black velvet paintings of Elvis, lurid images on romance novels, hallmark iconography… The list is to long.

    Line: That element of form that is primarily understood in terms of length and direction.

    Linear: Consisting of or based upon lines or line-like divisions in space.
    Local Color: The natural color of an object or material.

    Low Art: Traditionally refers to common arts, popular arts, applied arts, folk art.

    Low Relief: 3-D form that is only slightly raised from a flat background.

    Luminosity: the actual or illusory effect of giving off light.

    Machine Art: Aesthetic based on machine forms and imagery.

    Maquette: A small-scale model of a large sculptural work.

    Mass: Perceived weight or density of an object or area.

    Media Art: American 1970s art movement emphasizing use of popular mass media in art expression. Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Chris Burden, Joseph Beuys, Guerilla Girls.

    Minimalism, Minimal Art: Nonrepresentational art simplified to the maximum, using very few forms and colors. Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Agnes Martin, Robert Morris, Richard Serra, Tony Smith, Robert Mangold.

    Mixed Media: Combining several different media in one work.

    Mobile: A word originally referring to the early work of Alexander Calder, now refers to any suspended kinetic artwork whose movement is powered by a natural force, usually wind.

    Modernism: The widely diversified late 19th and early 20th century movement towards less objective or totally subjective art, characterized by the notion of art for art's sake.

    Modeling: Shaping work from a pliable material such as clay.

    Modifier: Something that changes the perceptual effect of form in space.

    Modulation: Smooth transition or change.

    Moire Effect: An illusionistic effect caused by close juxtaposition of high contrast lines or waves, overloading the optic nerve. See Op Art.

    Monochromatic: Color scheme developed from tints and shades of a single hue; any color scheme emphasizing a very few closely related colors.

    Monolithic: Characterized by a primary connected volume.

    Motif: An element, frequently the theme of a work, which may be repeated or elaborated on.

    Movement, Actual: real physical movement.

    Movement, Implied: Abstraction of static realism to create the visual effect of movement in progress, as in Giacomo Balla's study of a walking dog, or Marcel Duchamp's "Nude Descending a Staircase."

    Movement, Optical: Effect of movement created in 2-D work by the graphic juxtaposition of abstract patterns of contrasting color or value. See Op Art, moire effect.

    Movement, Pictorial: Movement depicted realistically in a completely static way - movement frozen in time, as in Degas' horse racing scenes or Gericault's paintings of mounted horsemen.

    Movement, Virtual: Effect of movement created by three-dimensional raised layers of patterns or shapes which seem to move as the viewer moves by the work.

    Multi-Media: Combination of visual art with popular arts media, such as television or recorded sound.

    Multiculturalism: In art, the purposeful incorporation of influences or imagery from multiple cultures.

    Multiples: 3-D artwork produced in multiples, either for greater visual/narrative impact, or for broader distribution. Jonathan Borofsky, Alexander Calder, John Chamberlain, Mark di Suvero, Marcel Duchamp, Ellsworth Kelly, Edward Kienholz, Isamu Noguchi, Claes Oldenburg, Man Ray, Victor Vasarely.

    Naive Art: Art created by individuals lacking in formal training, but often obsessed or driven in the creation of their artwork. Grandma Moses, Simon Rodia, Howard Finster.

    Narrative Art: Art in which the primary function is the narration of a specific message or story.

    Negative Space: Open space penetrating openings and surrounding the outer contour of a shape or form; the ground in a figure-ground relationship. That space which is controlled or affected by a shape or form.

    Neo-Dada: Revival of Dada, primarily in New York City beginning in 1950s, generally incorporating sense of paradox and ambiguity, challenging traditional expectations of art. Jasper Johns, Cy Twombly, Robert Rauschenberg, Allan Kaprow, Edward Kienholz, Bruce Conner.

    Neo-Expressionism: Art emerging in the 1980s closely allied to early 20th century expressionism. Anselm Kiefer, Georg Baselitz, Jonathan Borofsky, Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Sue Coe, Eric Fischl, Nancy Graves, David Salle, Julian Schnabel.

    Neo-Geo: The ultimate obscure 1980s art movement. No single defining characteristic. Ashley Bickerton, Jeff Koons.

    Nonlinear: Art that emphasizes organic and/or painterly form and surface, minimizing hard-edged rectilinear form. .

    Nonobjective Art: Having no readily identifiable resemblance to recognizable forms or objects.

    Nonrepresentational: Art that features no overall recognizable object or scene.

    Neutral: Color of very low saturation, approaching gray.

    Objective: Referring to objects as they actually are.

    Op Art: Style of nonobjective abstraction based on visual sensation known as optical movement, created by graphic juxtaposition of high-contrast abstract patterns, resulting in sensory overload to the optic nerve. See moire effect. Bridget Riley, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Larry Poons, Victor Vasarely, Yaacov Agam.

    Opaque: Having the property of blocking all light.

    Optical Color Mixing: Colors that occur as a result of visual perception, as along the contact line where two contrasting hues are juxtaposed.

    Organic: Having a shape or form referential to biological structures; form emphasizing curved shapes and volumes with minimal angularity.

    Outsider Art: Contemporary rt created outside the established traditions of art. Includes folk art and a variety of syntheses of non-mainstream art. The irony is that outsider art has become mainstream. Faith Ringold, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Lee Quinones.

    Painterly: Surfaces characterized by aggressive, nonlinear application of paint.

    Patina: Surface finish composed of a thin transparent film, usually conveys a sense of age or use.

    Pattern: A regularly repeating decorative design.

    Performance Art: Vague category of art beginning in 1960s encompassing work where the primary feature is enactment before an audience, either directly or documented on video or movie film. Vito Acconci, Scott Burton, Laurie Anderson, Chris Burden, Gilbert & George.

    Picture Plane: In 2-D art, the flat plane upon which the image actually exists. Any illusion of depth is said to exist beyond the picture plane.

    Pigment: A powdered colorant that is the coloring ingredient for paint and other color media.

    Planar: Characterized by juxtaposition of planes.

    Plane: That element of form that can be described in two dimensions, predominantly characterized by surface.

    Plastic: Any material that may be molded or shaped without adding or subtracting mass.

    Pluralism: Art that combines different styles and/or movements.

    Point: A real or conceptual mark indicating location but no specific direction or dimension.

    Point of View: The distance or angle from which something is seen.

    Polychrome; Polychromatic: Multicolor.

    Pop Art: 1950s and 60s art movement drawing primary inspiration and imagery from the popular arts. Andy Warhol, Robert Arneson, Jim Dine, Richard Hamilton, Robert Indiana, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha.

    Popular Arts: Radio, television, cinema, advertising, etc.

    Positive Space, Area or Form: The parts of a design that are perceived as being shape or object; the figure in a figure-ground relationship. In 3-D work, that which occupies actual physical space.

    Postmodernism: Direction in modern art beginning in the late 1960s involving a shift away from the formalism, optimism, and idealism of Modernism. Modernism specifically sought styles distant from traditional art, also often distant from the imagery and realities of everyday life. Postmodernism reinterprets the past in contemporary terms, reconnecting art and everyday reality, dissolving traditional categorical distinctions such as popular arts, low art, high art, naive art, and folk art.

    Post-Painterly Abstraction: After the flurry of Abstract Expressionism in the 1950s and 60s, a 1960s movement turning to clearly defined often geometric color-field painting. Gene Davis, Ellsworth Kelly, Kenneth Noland, Frank Stella.

    Potential Energy: The stored energy implied by mass elevated into space, often involving the impression of impending falling or other movement.

    Primary Axis: The major axis of a form or object, such as the spine in a human skeleton.

    Primary Colors: In color theory, red, yellow, and blue - those colors from which all other colors can theoretically be mixed.

    Primary Contour: the shape of the outermost extremity of a form.

    Primitivism: The purposeful creation of art that displays primitive and/or tribal qualities. Early examples are Gauguin’s incorporation of Tahitian tribal imagery, and Picasso’s use of imagery from African tribal sculpture. The term is obsolete, because it generally involved tragic misinterpretation of tribal imagery, due largely to the post-colonial idealistic notion of the "noble savage."

    Principles of Design: The unifying principles governing composition - variety, contrast, rhythm, repetition, balance, emphasis, economy, and proportion.

    Process Art: Art emphasizing the means rather than the results. A process set in motion by the artist determines the end product. Joseph Beuys, Hans Haacke, Eva Hesse, Richard Serra.

    Proportion: Comparative relationship of parts in terms of size, value, color, etc., independent of any specific measurement.

    Proximity: Relative nearness of shapes and forms to each other.

    Public Art: Art produced for and owned by the community. Often site-specific installation. Alice Aycock, Mary Miss, Joyce Kozloff, Isamu Noguchi, Claus Oldenburg, Albert Paley, Tony Smith, Richard Serra, Alan Sonfist, Mark di Suvero, Jackie Ferrara, Luis Jiminez.

    Radial Balance: Balance in all directions around a central point.

    Radiation: The quality of form which visually activates an area of space around it.

    Readymades: A manufactured functional object from everyday life presented as a work of art for its unintended aesthetic qualities, as in the work of Dadaists Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray.

    Realism: Visually accurate representation in art of known objects.

    Rectilinear: Composed of straight lines, as opposed to curvilinear.

    Regionalism: Art that emphasizes positive narrative content specific to a particular geographic region.

    Referential: Having the property of resemblance to an identifiable object, idea, or emotion.

    Relief: 3-D form rising from a 2-D surface.

    Relief Sculpture: A sculptural work where the image is carved inward or built outward from a two-dimensional surface.

    Repetition: Occurrence more than once. One of the basic unifying principles in design - can be repetition of shape, color, position, direction, etc.

    Representational: Art that objectively represents things.

    Rhythm: An arrangement of visual features in a measured sequence.

    Saturation: The measure of brightness or intensity in a color.

    Scale: Size of an object or the elements that compose it, in relation to the surroundings or the external world.

    Secondary Colors: Colors achieved by mixing adjacent primary colors; orange, green, and purple.

    Secondary Contours: Forms developed within the outer boundaries of a work.

    Semiotics: The science which studies signs and symbols used in communication. Since the 1960s, an important way of interpreting visual art.

    Shaped Canvas: In painting, an unconventionally-shaped 2-D canvas, or a 3-D object or surface which is used as a substrate for conventional painting media.

    Signifier: A mark or symbol that communicates a concept or idea.

    Simulation, Simulationism, Simulacrum: Beginning in 1980s, art which emphasizes appropriation of multiple objects or images form contemporary culture as a comment on the whole notion of originality. Barbara Kruger, Sherrie Levine, Allan McCollum.

    Simultaneous Contrast: Exaggerated visual contrast resulting when two highly-contrasting colors are juxtaposed. See optical color mixing and color vibration.

    Site-specific: referring to works designed for and installed in a specific location.

    Social Realism: Beginning in 1920s, narrative art which addresses contemporary issues of social injustice or decay. Edward Hopper, Charles Burchfield, Reginald Marsh.

    Space: Total area of design consideration; total area affected by a design.

    Spatial Orientation: The physical relationship of an object to its surroundings.

    Spatial Presence: Total field of space defined by a work, including activated space.

    Stabile: Alexander Calder’s term for a free standing mobile.

    Static Form: Without movement, implied or actual.

    Subjectivity: Concern with the ideas, thoughts, or feelings of the artist rather than the external verifiable qualities of objectivity.

    Subtractive Color Mixing: creating color with pigments, where added pigment results in a darker value, subtracting from reflected light. All colors combined give black.

    Subtractive Sculpture: Creation of a sculpture by carving away from a large piece of material.

    Surface: The planar areas of an objects which are exposed to the viewer.

    Surrealism: Art based on dreamlike images from the subconscious.

    Symbol: A figure or character signifying some concept, idea, or emotion beyond its visual appearance. See semiotics.

    Symmetrical Balance: 2-D or 3-D form that is a mirror image on either side of a central axis.

    Symmetry: Degree to which form and/or elements are arranged in mirror image on either side of a central axis. See symmetrical balance and asymmetrically balance.

    Superrealism: Extremely accurate representation of actual 3-D objects.

    Tactile: Appealing to the sense of touch, either actually or visually.

    Temporal: Relating to change occurring over time.

    Textural Field: A broad area with a unified texture.

    Texture: The tactile aspect of surface, actual or implied.

    Thermoplastic: material which becomes plastic with the application of heat.

    Totem; Totemic: form composed of stacked parts that show visual or narrative distinction between the parts.

    Topographic: Area of surface referencing a rise or fall in elevation. Relating to cartography. Representation of the surface features of a place or region on a map, indicating their relative positions and elevations. Can be used especially in relief work but also to study in the round objects and the figure.

    Trompe L’Oeil: Literally, "fool the eye" in French - optical illusion which convinces us we are seeing actual form or space when it does not exist. Or in 3-d work the work is so real that it visually becomes the object it is intending to represent.

    Transition: Area featuring contrast or change from one quality or appearance to another.

    Unifier: A formal or narrative element which allows a viewer to visually or conceptually connect or group various components of an image or object.

    Unity: Organization of parts, visual and conceptual, so that all contribute to a coherent whole.

    Utilitarianist: An artist who creates objects that encompass conceptual concerns but who’s primary focus is on objects that also have a function related to a specific use.

    Value: Relative degree of lightness or darkness.

    Value Contrast: Juxtaposition of light and dark areas.

    Value Pattern: The total overall pattern of lights and darks in an image or object.

    Vertical Balance: Distribution of visual emphasis determining impression of lightness or heaviness in a work.

    Visual Density: Concentration of visual elements activating a localized area.

    Visual Texture: The illusion of texture on a 2-D or 3-D form.

    Void: see negative space.

    Volume: A containment of space enclosed or implied by points, lines, or planes.

    Warm Colors: Those in the red, orange, and yellow range.

    Zeitgeist: In German, "spirit of the time" or "what’s in the air." In art, the essential character, atmosphere, and expression of a particular situation or period. Also can be thought about as the bandwagon or what is in style.


    Zzzzzzzzzzzz: What happens to the viewer if your work is boring.

              XVIIeme rallye cartographique du Bergeracois    
    La 17eme édition du rallye cartographique approche !! Pour ma part, je fais toujours partie de l'organisation, donc je ne serai pas présent lors du rassemblement au Leclerc. S'il y a des intéressés, allez voir sur la >> page FB du club <<, j'y ai mis toutes les infos nécessaires !!
              Pengertian Peta Beserta Batasan dan Jenisnya   

    1. Pengertian Peta

    Apa itu peta? Peta adalah gambaran konvesional muka bumi baik meliputi perwujudan, letak, maupun data yang berkaitan seperti tampak jika dilihat dari atas.
    Setiap makhluk hidup diperkirakan mempunyai kesadaran akan keadaan sekitarnya. banyak bukti yang menunjukkan bahwa pencitraan dalam angan-angan (Mental imagery) merupakan kegiatan otak normal, setidak-tidaknya pada otak binatang yang agak tinggi tingkatannya.
    Komponen yang penting dari gambaran dalam angan-angan adalah penyusunan objek secara keruangan (spatial arrangement of objects). Bagi kita, beberapa di antara objek tersebut harus disusun secara keruangan yang bersifat geografis (geographycal space) yang berkaitan dengan kehidupan kita.

    Pengertian Peta Beserta Batasan dan Jenisnya

    Gambaran angan-angan dapat berupa gambaran sederhana apabila penggambarannya secara topologis, seperti dekat-jauh, muka-belakang. Namun gambaran angan-angan dapat pula digambarkan secara agak meyakinkan apabila posisi objek-objek dimaksud dinyatakan secara konsep keruangan geometris.
    Citra atau gambaran dalam angan-angan merupakan suatu peta yang benda-benda objeknya diletakkan dalam lokasi relatif. Tentu saja peta-peta semacam ini bersifat unik bagi setiap individu. Peta inilah disebut peta mental (mental map).

    2. Batasan-Batasan Peta

    Untuk lebih memahami peta, berikut ini pengertian peta menurut beberapa ahli kartografi.

    a. Menurut ICA (International Cartographic Association)
        Peta adalah suatu gambaran atau representasi unsur-unsur ketampakan abstrak yang dipilih dari permukaan bumi, yang ada kaitannya dengan permukaan bumi atau benda-benda angkasa. Pada umumnya, peta digambarkan pada suatu bidang datar dan diperkecil atau diskalakan.

    b. Menurut Erwin Raisz
        Peta adalah gambaran konvensional dari permukaan bumi yang diperkecil sebagai ketampakkan jika dilihat dari atas dengan ditambah tulisan-tulisan sebagai tanda pengenal.

    c. Menurut R.M. Soetardjo Soerjosoemarno
        Peta adalah suatu lukisan dengan tinta dari seluruh atau sebagian permukaan bumi yang diperkecil dengan perbandingan ukuran yang disebut skala atau kedar.

    Dari beberapa pengertian tersebut, ada beberapa hal penting yang dapat ditarik kesamaannya, yaitu gambaran konvensional. Maksudnya, gambaran yang telah disepakati secara internasional, baik yang berupa ketampakan alami maupun ketampakan sosial budaya. Contonya ketampakan alami adalah warna air laut, simbol gunung, ketinggian tempat, dan hutan. Contoh ketampakan sosial budaya adalah sawah, kawasan perkebunan, dan tempat pariwisata.

    3. Jenis Peta

    Jika dilihat dari jenisnya, peta yang biasa digunakan sangat beragam. Karena terdapat banyak peta, sukar untuk menghitung jumlah peta yang sebenarnya. Meskipun begitu, peta dapat digolongkan sebagai berikut.

    a. Berdasarkan Skala Peta
        Atas dasar skalanya, peta dapat digolongkan menjadi empat golongan.
    1. Peta kadaster (peta berskala sangat besar) adalah peta yang berskala 1 : 100-1 : 5.000.
    2. Peta skala besar adalah peta yang berskala 1 : 5.000-1 : 250.000.
    3. Peta skala sedang adalah peta yang berskala 1 : 250.000-1 : 500.000.
    4. Peta skala kecil adalah peta yang berskala 1 : 500.000-1 : 1.000.000.
    b. Berdasarkan Isi Peta
        Atas dasar isinya, peta digolongkan menjadi dua kelompok, yaitu peta umum dan peta khusus.
    1. Peta umum adalah peta yang memberikan gambaran umum atau ketampakan yang bersifat umum pada pada suatu daerah tertentu. Ketampakan umum yang dimaksud adalah ketampakan umum yangada di daerah tertentu, baik yang bersifat alami (fisis) maupun sosial ekonomi (kultur). Peta umum terdiri atas tiga macam:
      • Peta topografi adalah peta umum berskala besar (biasanya 1 : 50.000). Karena skalanya besar, daerah yang dipetakan (untuk tiap-tiap lembar peta) sempit, sedangkan ketampakan yang tergambar sangat detail.
      • Peta chorografi adalah peta umum yang berskala sedang. Berisikan ketampakan yang bersifat umum dan global dalam daerah yang luas
      • Peta dunia adalah peta umum yang berskala kecil. Peta ini menggambarkan seluruh dunia dalam satu peta. Oleh karena itu, ketampakan yang tergambar sangat global sehingga yang digambar hanya bagian yang penting saja.
    2. Peta khusus atau peta tematik adalah peta yang menggambarkan ketampakan yang bersifat khusus yang terdapat di daera tertentu. Adapun jenis peta khusus, antara lain peta politik, peta kota, peta pariwisata, peta perhubungan, peta iklim, peta vegetasi, peta curah hujan, dan peta kepadatan penduduk. Untuk membuat peta khusus, dibutuhkan peta dasar yang memuat informasi yang akan dipetakan.
    c. Berdasarkan Objek yang Dipetakan
        Berdasarkan objek yang dipetakan, peta dapat dibedakan sebagai berikut.
    1. Peta statis atau stationer adalah peta yang menggambarkan keadaan yang relatif tetap atau jarang berubah. Misalnya, peta jenis tanah, peta administrasi suatu wilayah desa atau perkotaan, dan peta geologi.
    2. Peta dinamis adalah peta yang isinya menggambarkan keadaan yang dinamis atau cepat berubah. Misalnya, peta transmigrasi, peta urbanisasi, peta tata guna lahan, dan peta perencanaan wilayah kota.

    Demikianlah penjelasan tentang pengertian peta beserta batasan dan jenisnya. Semoga bermanfaat!

    Sumber:
    Bambang Nianto Mulyo
    Purwadi Suhandini
    Materi kelas XII Geografi 3


              Compte-rendu de la demi-journée d’études « Cartographier l’environnement et la société (XVIIIe-XXIe siècle). Du gouvernement par les cartes au moment cartographique ». Paris, EHESS, 9 mars 2017   
    Alice Ingold (EHESS) et Marc Elie (CNRS) ont organisé une demi-journée d’études sur le thème « Cartographier l’environnement et la société (XVIIIe-XXIe siècle). Du gouvernement par les cartes au moment cartographique » le 9 mars 2017. Vous en trouverez ci-joint un compte-rendu rédigé par Laurent Coumel (CERCEC). le RUCHEMore Posts
              Le Brésil   

    29,40€

    Scolaire / Universitaire (broché). Paru en 10/2012

    Le Brésil


    Hervé Théry

    Le Brésil est l'un des rares pays où l'expression " pays en voie de développement " a encore réellement un sens. Toujours l'un des plus grands pays exportateurs de minerais et de produits agricoles, il est aussi, désormais, un grand pays industriel, onzième puissance économique mondiale. Cette puissance s'exprime par l'intégration nationale en cours, voulue par l'État, où le vieux modèle de l'" archipel brésilien " - série d'" îles " autonomes séparées par d'immenses vides - fait place à une unique entité (économique, politique et culturelle) qui sait intégrer les milieux variés comme les diversités héritées de l'histoire. Si elles ont pu favoriser le décollage économique, les fortes inégalités spatiales et sociales fragilisent le Brésil et freinent désormais son développement. Les deux derniers présidents de la République, Fernando Henrique Cardoso et Luis Inacio Lula da Silva ont annoncé leur volonté de les réduire, sans grand succès pour le moment. Dans sa cinquième édition, l'ouvrage propose une cartographie et une iconographie entièrement nouvelles. Ses données statistiques sont toutes mises à jour et enrichies. Il insiste sur les facteurs de changement, les dynamiques en cours, les phénomènes structurants de l'espace. Il rappelle les faits historiques nécessaires à la compréhension des mécanismes de la croissance actuelle. Enfin, l'accent est mis sur les phénomènes qui contribuent à la structuration de l'espace car c'est l'attention portée aux aspects spatiaux des phénomènes humains qui fait la spécificité de la géographie parmi les sciences sociales.


    » Télécharger 22,99€

              (USA-NY-Binghamton) Signal Electrician   
    Signal Electrician - The electrician/signal electrician performs work; installing, maintaining and repairing a variety of electrical equipment related to the street lights, traffic signals and electrical components of systems located in City owned buildings and facilities. The work is performed in coordination with the Commissioner of Public Works and the City Engineer. The electrician/signal electrician works independently or with small work groups to complete projects. Incumbents of this position plan projects and make out their own work time schedules. Supervision may be the responsibility of the incumbent depending upon specific assignments and projects. Does all related work as required. Duties - Installs, maintains, repairs and replaces electric fixtures and cabinets related to traffic signals and street lights. Repairs and adjusts circuit breakers, controls and regulators by replacing working parts and repairing burned out contacts; Orders parts and keeps a record of time and materials used in electrical installations and repairs; May assist the stationery engineer, master electrician, and carpenters in major department work projects; May supervise or lead a group of employees in various work projects and assignments; Operates motor equipment in transporting equipment, tools and parts. Performs data entry using Cartography software to document work and maintain information related to traffic signals, street lights, and other electric components worked on; Plans maintenance and Capital Projects for the Street Lighting and Traffic Signal Systems. Major Skills - Good knowledge of the practices, tools, terminology and safety precautions of the trade; ability to follow oral and written instructions; ability to operate and care for power equipment; willingness and ability to plan and supervise projects; Ability to operate a personal computer and utilize common office software programs including word processing, spreadsheet, and database (CarteGraph) at an acceptable rate of accuracy and speed; physical condition commensurate with the demands of the position. Qualifications - Graduation from high school or possession of a high school equivalency diploma and completion of a five year apprenticeship or equivalent Trade School and five years field experience as a Journeyman, Lineman or Electrician along with a minimum of two years in a supervisory role: OR Graduation from a regionally accredited or New York State registered college or university with an Associate's Degree in Electrical Technology and five years in the field as a Journeyman, Lineman or Electrician along with two years of supervision; OR An equivalent combination of training and experience as defined by the limits of (a) and (b) above. Special Requirement - JOURNEYMAN Electrician license in the City of Binghamton or the ability to obtain one within the probationary period. Possession of a NYS DMV issued Class D Motor Vehicle Operator's License at time of appointment. Must maintain the license during the entire length of appointment. Must maintain training thru on the job training and on line (internet) within one (1) year of date of hire to perform and be proficient in traffic signal repairs.
              Stage - Business Developer - Paris   
    Au sein de notre équipe, composée de 30 personnes, vous travaillerez en binôme avec un ou plusieurs Business Developer seniors qui vous formeront aux techniques de vente B to B les plus abouties. Vos responsabilités seront variées et adaptées au besoin de chacun de nos clients : prospection, détection de besoins, cartographie de comptes, identification de cibles, présentations ou événements marketing / ventes (opens, salons), conduite de rendez-vous.
              Awesome Science Websites   
    Ok I know I promise lots and deliver few...lol... But, here's my super secret list of science websites kids will absolutely adore.


    Interesting Sciences

    TV Shows & Science

     


              Cartographia:Görögország című könyv - Jelenlegi ára: 1 999 Ft   
    Aukció tárgya: Cartographia: Görögország
    Állapota: megkímélt állapotban

    Cartographia:Görögország című könyv
    Jelenlegi ára: 1 999 Ft
    Az aukció vége: 2017-07-22 08:45
              Voilier Sun Odyssey 45.2   
    Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 45.2 (1997) Gréement dormant - cages de ridoir - embouts (2011) - Révisé 10-2014 Gréement courant, poulies (2011-2014) Tous les passes-coque et vannes (2011 et 2013) Instruments Raymarine (2xST 6002, anémo i60, bidata i40) (2011/10-2014) Garmin GPSmap 292 + cartograph[...]
              Savoir et science dans les bibliothèques (François Dingremont)   

    Toute bibliothèque reflète une vision sur l'organisation des savoirs, du savoir. Le catalogue, la cotation sont parmi les instruments qui permettent de matérialiser et de partager cette vision, entre les multiples utilisateurs d'une bibliothèque. Comment s'est constituée cette cartographie des champs intellectuels, des lieux de savoir, dans la tradition de la bibliothéconomie occidentale ? Quels sont les enjeux, quels sont les pièges et les défis de la cotation des livres dans une bibliothèque. François Dingremont, helléniste, docteur et magasinier dans une grande bibliothèque universitaire parisienne, nous invite à réfléchir sur l'organisation et le découpage des savoirs, vus depuis l'étiquette collée sur le dos des livres qui nourrissent notre travail...


              Les Lieux de savoir en débat à l’Institut des Humanités (III)   
      Aurélien Berra présente la notion de lieu Notion centrale dans l’ouvrage, particulièrement visible dans le premier volume, Espaces et communautés. Cette notion de lieu est déclinée de plusieurs façons. Ce sont des espaces concrets : bureaux, laboratoires, écran d’ordinateur, ou des espaces métaphoriques : groupes sociaux ou individus, réseau de savants, traditions… L’ouvrage veut être lui-même un lieu de savoirs. Tous les articles sont fondés sur des cas, définissant les lieux. Il s’agit de faire une cartographie des savoirs. Chaque article est un point sur … Continuer la lecture de Les Lieux de savoir en débat à l’Institut des Humanités (III)
              Pour une nouvelle cartographie des savoirs   
    Esprit
              C’est quoi l’idée ? Allez savoir…   
    Libération Livres, Jeudi 29 Novembre 2007, sur le premier volume des Lieux de savoir. Trois autres vont suivre: Les Mains de l’intellect, La Construction des traditions et Identité, métissage, universalité. Mais le premier volume des « Lieux de savoir », – Espaces et communautés – est déjà une somme. Il fallait en effet plus d’un millier de pages à une soixantaine de chercheurs internationaux, et la mobilisation de toutes les sciences humaines, pour cartographier les « mille manières dont à travers les âges et les cultures les … Continuer la lecture de C’est quoi l’idée ? Allez savoir…
              Comment on Map of the Month by 7 sites incríveis para quem é apaixonado por mapas – Blog do Sistema de Bibliotecas da UCS   
    […] International Cartographic Association Todo mês, a Associação Cartográfica Internacional elege um projeto cartográfico para ser homenageado. Você pode conferir todos os vencedores — desde 2009 — na página “Map of the Month”. […]
              The Middle Stage's Books of 2011-12: Indian Literature   
    It would be hard for any reader now to keep up just with Indian novels, or books on Indian history, or Indian narrative non-fiction, let alone books from all these diverse fields. My list is no more than a small, very personal selection of the many high-quality new books published in India over the last two years.

    To begin: novels. The two best Indian novels I read these past two years were Amitav Ghosh's River of Smoke, the second book of his ambitious and widescale Ibis trilogy, and Jhootha Sach, the Hindi writer Yashpal's massive magnum opus set on either side of the Partition years and in cities -- Lahore and Delhi -- either side of the border that Partition would make impermeable. Ghosh's protagonist in River of Smoke -- and the focaliser of much of the narration -- Bahram Mody, a character absent in The Sea of Poppies, is one of the most memorable characters in Indian fiction, and the Bombay and Canton settings of the book are exquisitely laid out even as the polyphonic narrative voices and linguistic play of The Sea of Poppies are carried over. I read the book over three days at a Portuguese deli in London, and they remain bright in my memory as three of the best reading days of my life.

    Yashpal's novel, on the other hand, was first published in 1958; its size -- over a thousand pages -- perhaps prevented it from arriving earlier into Indian fiction in English. For its Tolstoyan sweep and density of detail, its realism with regard to human nature and its idealism about the power of human aspirations, and its magisterial overview of the religious cataclysms in the Indian subcontinent in the nineteen-forties, this novel seems to me a plausible contender for the greatest of all Indian novels. It is one of those books that one lives as much as reads. It is translated by Yashpal's son, Anand, and appeared in the Penguin Classics series -- to my mind the most diverse and exciting publishing list in all of Indian literature today. Longer pieces on Ghosh and Yashpal are here and here, and you should also read the translator Daisy Rockwell's essay on Jhootha Sach, "Night-Smudged Light". Among other Indian novels, UR Ananthamurthy's Bharathipura (Oxford University Press) deserves to be read by anybody interested in Indian fiction as an interrogation of the deep structures of Indian social life.

    In non-fiction, the two books by Indian writers that I enjoyed most couldn't have been written in more different styles, or had as their subject more disparate personalities: respectively a bar dancer in Bombay and  an eighteenth-century Scottish natural philosopher. Sonia Faleiro's Beautiful Thing (Penguin/Grove), a book-length tracking of the rise, fall, and reinvention/suspension of Leela, a star of one of Bombay's dance bars, combined reportorial detachment and narrative empathy in just the right proportions. Faleiro's eye for detail is superior to almost any other Indian writer today, and her translations of Leela's talk into English initially appear patronising but only because they are so daring. Her work at the intersection of standard English and Indian English, or Indian English drawing on other languages, rivals the recent experiments in the same field by Ghosh and Vikram Chandra.

    No human beings appear in the flesh in Kaushik Basu's Beyond The Invisible Hand: Groundwork for a New Economics (Princeton University Press and Penguin); there are only the intellectual ghosts of dead ones, particularly Adam Smith, whose ideas about the workings of markets and morality have been claimed and in many instances radically damaged by free-market thinkers of our time. But Basu has a wonderfully wry sense of humour, an eye for local examples for universal laws (such as the "ele bele phenomenon"), and an argumentative style so rigorous and yet unassuming -- consider the use of the word "groundwork" in his title -- that the three hundred or so pages of his book left me wanting much more. So I read it twice. The book is an elegant and unpartisan meditations on one of the great issues of our age: markets and their limits, and offers a roadway to rescuing free-market thinking from its more fanatical adherents. Chapter 1 of the book is here; you couldn't improve your brain more for an investment of Rs. 303. Basu's Twitter feed is consistently good reading too.

    The scholar of religion Diana Eck's India: A Sacred Geography is a book that just can't be read without stopping -- only because so voluminous, rich, dense, and allusive -- and one which provides intellectual challenges and surprising connections from beginning to end. Its reading of Indian geography as a construct of the Hindu religious imagination before it was a secular cartographic map has a range that requires over five hundred pages to bring it out. “As arcane as lingas of light . . . and sacred rivers falling from heaven may seem to those who wish to get on with the real politics of today’s world,” Eck writes, “these very patterns of sanctification continue to anchor millions of people in the imagined landscape of their country.” a longer essay on her book is here.

    I also found much to learn from about Bombay in Neera Adarkar's great anthology The Chawls of Mumbai: Galleries of Life (ImprintOne, longer essay here) and about the freedom struggle in Kashmir in Sanjay Kak's book Until My Freedom Has Come (longer essay here). Both these anthologies are primarily collections of essays by scholars and journalists, but neither Adarkar nor Kak are oblivious of the role of fiction in explaining the world and its dilemmas. The stories by the urban historian Prasad Shetty and the Kashmiri short-story writer Arif Ayaz Parrey are amongst the brightest lights in these books.

    Short fiction. Anjum Hasan had already made a considerable reputation as a poet when she published her superb debut novel Lunatic In My Head in 2007, and last year she proved just as adept at the short-story form when she published her first collection, Difficult Pleasures (Penguin). Hasan brings a poet's startling perception and defamiliarizing eye to the observation of all her protagonists, as when the protagonist of "Banerjee and Banerjee", the economist Banerjee, is shown thinking -- entirely persuasively, if against the grain of the very story that is bringing him to life -- that "the crisscrossing of goods and services across the globe, created in hundreds of different environments and in response to countless human needs, is somehow a larger, better and more beautiful thing than any facts to do with individual lives."

    Another poet, Janice Pariat, established herself as a major new narrative voice -- lyrical, elliptical, and empathetic -- with Boats On Land (Random House India).

    Gogu Shyamala's Father May Be An Elephant And Mother Only A Small Basket, But...(Navayana), rooted in the stories of Telangana in Andhra Pradesh and translated by several hands from the Telugu, impressed not only for the economy of Shyamala's style and the directness of the narration, but also because they take writing about Dalit protagonists beyond an older narrative binary of exploitation and suffering, enlarged and emaciated selfhood. Credit should also go to the publisher in working up a uniform and lucent English style for Shymala from translations by different hands.

    Two works of fiction which had the words "Love Stories" in their titles were Annie Zaidi's Love Stories: #1 to 14 (HarperCollins) and Rajesh Parameswaran's debut collection I Am An Executioner: Love Stories (Knopf). Zaidi's work, taking one of fiction's most complex objects of inquiry head-on, was closely observed, multifaceted, and clearly thought through as a unity. "The One That Badly Wanted", about a girl who falls in love with a dead man, was a particular delight. Some of Parameswaran's stories indulged too heavily in the narrative hijinks that are a staple of the restless short fiction of our time, but his story about love in an alternative universe, “On the Banks of Table River (Planet Lucina, Andromeda Galaxy, AD 2319)”, was the most beautiful thing I read this year.

    My poetic instincts are less sound than my prose ones and therefore my pursuit of new work in verse in India less secure, but over the last year I've dipped repeatedly into the bucking, slangy versions of Kabir produced by the poet Arvind Krishna Mehrotra in his ambitious Poems of Kabir (New York Review of Books/ Hachette) and the fourteenth-century Kashmiri mystic Lalded's exquisitely elliptical and jagged ruminations on life, god and human relationships rendered into English by Ranjit Hoskote in I, Lalded (Penguin). These are books that will speak to readers just as powerfully in a hundred years as they do now. Hoskote's magisterial introduction to Lalded is also the best single piece of critical writing to have come my way in the last two years.

    Last: literary criticism and intellectual history. So much work in the West on the Indian novel focusses on the best Indian writers in English -- Rushdie, Ghosh, Naipaul, Seth -- that this bias seeps back into Indian literature and Indian bookshops. So it was great to see a completely convincing case being made for the Oriya novelist Fakir Mohan Senapati being not just a writer that Indians should read but one that readers around the world should read by the contributors of Colonialism, Modernity and Literature (Palgrave Macmillan/ Orient Longman), edited by Satya P. Mohanty, one of Senapati's translators. A conclave of Indian and American literary critics show that Senapati's riddling humour, circling and subversive point of view, and throughly original narrative technique make his novel Six Acres and a Third one of the greatest and most durable of Indian novels, one that, as the critic Himansu Mohapatra memorably writes, "reveals the causal joints of the world." All novelists desire to earn this compliment.

    And finally, the intellectual historian DR Nagaraj, who passed away tragically early while still in his forties, left behind an astoundingly diverse body of work -- and a carefully sculpted point of view -- about Indian society, native traditions, Kannada epics and novels and literary criticism, communal violence, and the tension between Gandhian and Ambedkarite thought. Although sometimes prolix and orotund, Nagaraj's prose is also marked by fantastic metaphorical leaps and fine-grained reading of texts. The white heat of Listening to the Loom (Permanent Black), a posthumous collection of Nagaraj's essays put together by his student Prithvi Chandra Datta Shobhi, kept me up many nights in July. “If the methods and philosophical positions of present times are fit and useful to analyse the formulations of several kinds of pre-modern eras," writes Nagaraj, "the reverse should also be true.” His book is that pathway that runs back into the mists of time.

    Happy reading in 2013!

              On Diana Eck's India: A Sacred Geography and Akash Kapur's India Becoming   
    This review appears today in The Washington Post.


    It’s most unusual to see geography as primarily a construct of the human imagination, but that is precisely what the scholar of Hinduism Diana Eck attempts in her massive new book, India: A Sacred Geography. Thousands of years before India was a nation-state (1947), a colony of Britain (the 18th century), or a cartographic vision on a map (1782), it was, in Eck’s view, conceived as a geographical unit in the hearts and minds of the faithful, and particularly in the religious imagination of Hinduism.
    Pilgrims thought of India as the land of the seven great rivers, as a space marked by the benediction and caprice of the gods who resided in the great northern peaks of the Himalayas, as woven into unity by the great centers of pilgrimage, or dhams, in the north, south, east and west. Seeking the marks and manifestations of the sacred, they fashioned with their footprints a map of a vast subcontinent suffused with the presence of the gods and stories of their appearances in different incarnations.
    Eck’s perspective has significant political implications. It arguably refutes the widely held notion that India was merely a confusion of diverse kingdoms, cultures and languages until it was politically integrated by the British Empire. Some scholars hold that the idea of Hinduism, too, is the modern tracing of a circle around a diversity of ancient religious beliefs never self-consciously systematized into a whole. This idea struggles to hold up against the layered evidence supplied by Eck’s book, the synthesis of three decades of work on the myths, rituals, cosmology and everyday life of Hinduism.
    But the appeal of the book lies in the fact that its emphasis is not political, but aggregative and connective, making a forest out of a mass of trees. Eck offers an exceptionally rich account of how, throughout India, the cosmic is mapped onto the local in a tradition formed, revised and renewed over the centuries by thousands of discrete phenomena and often anonymous actors.
    This map of myth, as it were, radiates a worldview very different from the assumptions of modern cartography. Cartography invests each place on a map with a name and an unassailable specificity. But sacral maps, Eck notes, are marked continuously by “patterns of duplication and condensation,” demonstrating an ability “to see a world in a grain of sand,” in William Blake’s unforgettable formulation. For instance, thousands of rivers and water bodies across the country are said to be linked to or fed by the holiest river of Hinduism, the Ganga. The Ganga is, depending on what lens one brings to it, both somewhere and everywhere.
    “As arcane as lingas of light . . . and sacred rivers falling from heaven may seem to those who wish to get on with the real politics of today’s world,” Eck writes, “these very patterns of sanctification continue to anchor millions of people in the imagined landscape of their country.”
    She devotes entire chapters to regional variations in the worship of the great generative god Shiva, the creator of the universe, or the myth of the Mother Goddess, who is consecrated and remembered in thousands of local incarnations as “the goddesses of earth and village, glade and river, hilltop and mountaintop.” In doing so Eck demonstrates how, just as novels are fully realized only in the minds of their readers, gods are made present in the world by the stories and footsteps of the faithful.
    The two main currents of contemporary nonfiction about India might be said to be a broadbrush view animated by strong particulars (such as Patrick French’s recent India: A Portrait) and an attempt to fully realize a fascinating local world (such as two recent books about discrete realms in the megalopolis of Mumbai, Katherine Boo’s Behind The Beautiful Forevers and Sonia Faleiro’s Beautiful Thing). Eck’s book might be said to stand at the sangam, or junction (a site of great religious power in Hinduism), of these currents.
    Its ideas reverberate forcefully, too, against other recent works about geography as informed by the human imagination, such as Rebecca Solnit’s book about San Francisco, Infinite City, or Graham Robb’s The Discovery of France. (Robb and Eck also resemble each other in never writing an uninteresting or flat sentence.) All these writers would be fundamentally in agreement with Eck’s assertion that “every story has a place and every place a story.”
    Eck’s book is so dense with detail that one might think of its 500 pages as a distillation of a world. In Akash Kapur’s India Becoming,” on the other hand, an idea that might be written up in a few sentences is stretched out, through the conceit of an autobiographical narrative, into an entire book.
    In 2003 Kapur returns, after many years in America, to India, the country of his childhood, and finds the sleepy, unmoving world of old dramatically refashioned by new energies — especially the energies of capital — and ambitions. Fascinated by “that sense of newness, of perpetual reinvention and forward momentum that I had felt when I first moved to America,” Kapur beds down in Auroville, a small south Indian town, to take stock of this dramatic historical moment.
    He explores the new India through a variety of conversations with, among others, a landlord who sees the old feudal world falling away around him, a young gay man riding the wave of the IT revolution and an activist in Mumbai fighting for the rights of those who have been marginalized or dispossessed by ruthlessness of the new economy. The Hegelian triad of thesis, antithesis and synthesis slowly emerges from his narration, but only as cliche, reverse cliche and all-encompassing cliche.
    Dazzled in the beginning by the rumbling of a society of a billion people (“India, I felt, had started to dream”), Kapur soon begins to feel disillusionment with the spectacle of rising crime, pollution and poverty, and a “culture of not caring.” Finally he decides that he has been too hasty in both his elation and his despair, and settles for the comfort of realizing that “the central fact . . . of modern India was change” and the mystification “ineluctably, if at times haltingly, a new world was rising.”
    If this were a novel, one might surmise that the writer was deliberately setting the narrator up as a naif. Anyone who reads it as straight-up reportage, though, will probably find the banality and contrivance of this self-indulgent “journey” exasperating. It is not just that Kapur does not take any strong positions (“I welcomed the progress. But all the destruction seemed a heavy price to pay”). What is worse is that his language groans with superfluity (“It was evening, a time between night and day, and the lights of the city were starting to come on”) and lazy allusion (“India, the author Nirad Chaudhuri reportedly once wrote, is a nation of a million exceptions”).
    If Eck’s book reveals the relevance of the local, the unfamiliar and the seemingly obscure to the deep structure of a civilization, Kapur’s proves conversely the great gulf between taking up a relevant subject and writing a relevant book.

              الوكالة الوطنية للمحافظة العقارية والمسح الخرائطية: مباريات توظيف في عدة تخصصات – 150 منصبا، آخر أجل هو 17 يوليوز 2017   

    تعلن الوكالة الوطنية للمحافظة العقارية والمسح الخرائطية عن مباريات توظيف في عدة تخصصات - 150 منصبا، آخر أجل هو 17 يوليوز 2017
    Agence Nationale de la Conservation Foncière du Cadastre et de la Cartographie – ANCFCC:  Concours de recrutement de 150 Cadres et  Agents de maîtrise

    التدوينة الوكالة الوطنية للمحافظة العقارية والمسح الخرائطية: مباريات توظيف في عدة تخصصات – 150 منصبا، آخر أجل هو 17 يوليوز 2017 ظهرت أولاً على Dimajadid Alwadifa مباريات الوظيفة بالمغرب و ولوج المدارس العليا.


               Sol    




     Linda  Imagem né verdade ?







    Olhando assim até parece que esse lindo brilho emitido por uma estrela a centenas de milhares de km de ditância da Terra é pequena.





    ....
     Astronomia uma ciência que estuda os astros_ uma designação comum a todos os corpos celestes, ou seja, tudo que está disperso no universo são corpos celestes, uma simples poeira cosmica, até gigantescas estrelas. Falando em estrelas, corpos compostos por 99% de gases, sendo helio e hidrogênio, e claro que há também fragmentos rochosos.
    O Sol formou-se cerca de 4,57 bilhões (4,567 mil milhões) de anos atrás quando uma nuvem molecular entrou em colapso. Evolução estelar é medida em duas maneiras: através da presente idade da sequência principal do Sol, que é determinada através de modelagens computacionais de evolução estelar; e nucleocosmocronologia. A idade medida através destes procedimentos está de acordo com a idade radiométrica do material mais antigo encontrado no Sistema Solar, que possui 4,567 bilhões (4,567 mil milhões) de anos.
    Em cerca de 5 bilhões (5 mil milhões) de anos, o hidrogênio no núcleo solar esgotará. Quando isto ocorrer, o Sol entrará em contração devido à sua própria gravidade, elevando a temperatura do núcleo solar até 100 milhões de kelvins, suficiente para iniciar a fusão nuclear de hélio, produzindo carbono, entrando na fase do ramo gigante assimptótico.



    O destino da Terra é precário. Como uma gigante vermelha, o Sol terá um raio máximo maior de 250 UA, maior do que a órbita atual da Terra. Porém, quando o Sol tornar-se uma gigante vermelha, a estrela terá perdido cerca de 30% de sua massa atual, devido à massa perdida no vento solar, com os planetas afastando-se gradualmente do Sol, à medida que o Sol perde massa. Este fator por si mesmo provavelmente seria o suficiente para permitir que a Terra não fosse engolida pelo Sol, visto que a Terra afastar-se-ia o suficiente da estrela, mas pesquisas recentes mostram que a Terra será engolida pelo Sol devido à forças de maré.

    Mesmo que a Terra não seja incinerada pelo Sol, a água do planeta evaporará, e a maior parte de sua atmosfera escapará para o espaço. De fato, o Sol gradualmente torna-se mais brilhante com o passar do tempo, mesmo na sequência principal (10% a cada 1 000 000 000 anos), com sua temperatura de superfície gradualmente aumentando com o tempo. O Sol foi no passado menos brilhante, sendo que no início possuía 75% da luminosidade atual, uma possível razão pela qual vida em terra firme somente existiu nos últimos 1 000 000 000 anos. Em outros 1 000 000 000 anos, o aumento da temperatura fará com que a superfície da Terra torne-se quente demais para possibilitar a existência de água líquida, e portanto, impossibilitará vida na Terra em sua forma atual.

    A fusão de hélio sustentará o Sol por cerca de 100 milhões de anos, quando então o hélio no núcleo solar esgotará. O Sol não possui massa o suficiente para converter carbono em oxigênio, e portanto, não explodirá como uma supernova. Ao invés disso, após o término da fusão de hélio, intensas pulsações térmicas farão com que o Sol ejete suas camadas exteriores, formando uma nebulosa planetária. O único objeto que permanecerá após a ejeção será o extremamente quente núcleo solar, que resfriará gradualmente, permanecendo como uma anã branca com metade da massa atual (com o diâmetro da Terra) por bilhões (mil milhões) de anos. Este cenário de evolução estelar é típico de estrelas de massa moderada e baixa.


     é  incrível como uma simples e linda imagem como esta pode parecer que nossa estrela é pequena e está logo " ali", bem próxima de nós, mas é enorme e está a uma distância da Terra de cerca de 150 milhões de km.


    Noi siamo gli ultimi del mondo.
    Ma questo mondo non ci avrà.
    Noi lo distruggeremo a fondo.
    Spezzeremo la società.
    Nelle fabbriche il capitale
    come macchine ci usò.
    Nelle scuole la morale
    di chi comanda ci insegnò.

    Questo pugno che sale
    questo canto che va
    è l’Internazionale
    un’altra umanità.
    Questa lotta che uguale
    l’uomo all’uomo farà,
    è l’Internazionale.
    Fu vinta e vincerà.

    Noi siamo gli ultimi di un tempo
    che nel suo male sparirà.
    Qui l’avvenire è già presente
    chi ha compagni non morirà.
    Al profitto e al suo volere
    tutto l’uomo si tradì,
    ma la Comune avrà il potere.
    Dov’era il no faremo il sì.

    Questo pugno che sale…

    E tra di noi divideremo
    lavoro, amore, libertà.
    E insieme ci riprenderemo
    la parola e la verità.
    Guarda in viso, tienili a memoria
    chi ci uccise, chi mentì.
    Compagni, porta la tua storia
    alla certezza che ci unì.

    Questo pugno che sale…

    Noi non vogliam sperare niente.
    il nostro sogno è la realtà.
    Da continente a continente
    questa terra ci basterà.
    Classi e secoli ci han straziato
    fra chi sfruttava e chi servì:
    compagno, esci dal passato
    verso il compagno che ne uscì.

    Questo pugno che sale…

    _________

    *Unless otherwise indicated, all references are to the essay Maintenant, published by La fabrique, 2017.

      category: 

                1st International Conference of Anarchist Geographies and Geographers (ICAGG) – Geography, social change and antiauthoritarian practices    

      From ICAGG

      1st International Conference of Anarchist Geographies and Geographers (ICAGG) – Geography, social change and antiauthoritarian practices

      Reggio Emilia (Italy) – Centro Studi Cucine del Popolo, via Beethoven 78/e, 21-23 September 2017 – http://www.cucine.arealibertaria.org/

      In the last years, an outstanding international and multilingual rediscovery of anarchist geographers has occurred at the level both of academics and of grassroots movements, drawing at the same time on a renewed interest for historical figures like Pyotr Kropotkin (1842-1921) and Elisée Reclus (1830-1905), and on the contributions of anarchist and antiauthoritarian ideas and practices to present-day struggles for social liberation worldwide. Special issues on anarchism and geography have been published by outstanding international journals, such as Antipode and ACME, leading to a flourishing of recent papers and books on these topics, including the organisation of successful sessions on anarchist geographies at the most widely attended geographic international conferences, such as the RGS-IBG, the AAG and the IGU, and for the international conferences of the Anarchist Studies Network. An international mailing list of anarchist geographies has also been inaugurated.

      In the French-speaking circuits, a flourishing of grassroots initiatives and scholarly research has likewise taken place, leading to the foundation of a network of anarchist geographers (Réseau de géographes libertaires), which organises a number of periodic conferences and workshops in France and Switzerland, and contributes to two important annual festivals targeting the communication between scholars and wider publics in France. The first, Les Reclusiennes, takes place in Sainte-Foy-la-Grande, the town of origin of Elisée Reclus, and the second, the Festival International de la Géographie in Saint-Dié-des-Vosges, includes an anarchist-driven Forum of Critical Geographies. In South America, conferences and public courses on anarchist geographies are periodically organised, mainly in Brazil, by the networks of ReKro-Rede Reclus-Kropotkin de Estudos Libertários and the Anarchist Library Terra Livre, in collaboration with universities like UFRJ and USP. This list could continue, but it is just a sample of the rich and cosmopolite field in which the present-day debates in anarchist geographies are developing.

      In light of the flourishing of anarchist geographies, we propose to organize an independent international conference, to be repeated in different countries every 2 or 3 years, to create a space for scholars and militants interested in these topics to enjoy a deep and fruitful exchange, and present an opportunity for those interested in anarchist geographies and rooted in broader social movements internationally to exchange ideas and make meaningful connections’. The choice of doing the first conference in an Italian small town like Reggio Emilia, where an established local anarchist movement already promoted events and publications on anarchist geographers is instrumental to the capital tasks of continuing a discussion among scholars and militants from different linguistic and cultural areas, and ensuring discussions involve grassroots movements and militant situations outside the academy.

      This conference is not only for “card-carrying” anarchists. We welcome contributions dealing critically with anarchist geographies, histories, concepts, and interventions from grassroots movements, militants, and academics.

      We invite especially, but not exclusively, critical anarchic geographical contributions on:

          • What are anarchist geographies and what are their tasks?

            Which relations between anarchism and the most current critical/theoretical approaches used in geographical scholarship, i.e. postmodernism and post-structuralism, critical modernities, post-colonialism, more-than-human geographies, actor-network theory, non-representational theories, feminism, gender and queer theories, Marxism, critical race theory, intersectionality, qualitative and quantitative methods etc.?

        • Problematizing the relations between anarchism, rationalism, Enlightenment and modernity.

      • Anarchist geographies and counter-cartography. Maps and spaces of liberation.

      • Anarchist geographies and Indigenous movements.

      • Anarchism and the environment: mesology, natural philosophies and the idea of progress.

      • Anarchist geographies in practice: experiences from grassroots movements, local and international struggles, histories and geographies of resistance.

      • Anti-statist, post-statist and not statist geographies: anarchism and the idea of territory.

      • Anarchism, federalism and the concept of geographical scale: cities, regions and the global.

      • Anti-racist, anti-colonial and internationalist geographies.

      • Anarchist geographies, cosmopolitanism and multilingualism: which challenges to nationalist and parochial academies?

      • Anarchism and geographies of war and peace.

      • Anarchism and geographies of violence and non-violence.

      • Anarchist geographies of education and de-schooling.

      • Geographies of secularisation and free-thinking.

      • Anarchist geopolitics.

      • Historical geographies of anarchism.

      • Anarchist geographies and geographers in the history and philosophy of geography.

      • Historical figures of anarchist geographers and their interdisciplinary connections: histories of transnational anarchism, anarchist anthropologies, political theory and political philosophy.

      To attend the conference, please send an abstract of maximum 250 words at the address scientific_committee@icagg.org by February 1st 2017. The preferred conference’s language is English: if you feel especially uncomfortable with presenting in this language, please write to the organisers in order to arrange some specific solution. Further information will be provided by e-mail and through the site www.icagg.org

      Practical information: For information on travel, accommodation and any other practical query (need for childcare, dietary requirements etc.), please write to icagg2017@icagg.org

      Scientific and Promoting Committee:

      Gerónimo Barrera

      Béatrice Collignon

      Amir El-Hakim

      Fabrizio Eva

      Federico Ferretti

      Anthony Ince

      Marcelo Lopes de Souza

      Patrick Minder

      Joanne Norcup

      Philippe Pelletier

      Marcella Schmidt di Friedberg

      Adriano Skoda

      Vanessa Sloan Morgan

      Simon Springer

      Francisco Toro

      Gian Maria Valent

      Richard White

      Patricia Wood

      Local organisation committee:

      Eliana Bartoli

      Arturo Bertoldi

      Lorenzo Coniglione

      Fabio Dolci

      Andrea Ferrari

      Simone Ruini

      Gian Maria Valent

      category: 

                Comment on Calling all cartographers and map-lovers: A request for Massimo Vignelli by Adena Schutzberg   
      He died yesterday. http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-massimo-vignelli-20140528-story.html
                Cartographer   

                Cartographer   

                Administrative Assistant III - HERE Technologies - Berlin   
      HERE is a leader in global maps and location intelligence. Rooted in almost three decades of experience in cartography, its vision is simple and
      Gefunden bei HERE Technologies - Wed, 28 Jun 2017 05:55:17 GMT - Zeige alle Berlin Jobs
                Authentic Models Replica Vaugondy 1745 Globe on stand   

      Sophisticated Decor

      This Authentic Models Vaugondy globe on stand from circa 1795 has a hand turned tabletop, polished wood and bronze. A striking piece of decor, it would look wonderful placed on a desk or bookshelf in a sophisticated gentleman's office.

      Historical Significance

      Gilles Robert de Vaugondy and his son Didier were the leading mapmakers in France during the 1700s. Didier was appointed geographer to King Louis XV in 1760 and published globes of various sizes, the biggest with a diameter of 2.6m! Authentic Models Vaugondy globes are created with the 18th century mapmakers in mind.

      World Leader in Antique Globes

      Authentic Models are a famous leader in antique globes, and no other company in the world offers authentic reproductions of similar quality and affordability. The globes span four centuries, from the Renaissance to the colonial era, and highlight some of the most famous cartographers in the world; Mercator, Hondius and Vaugondy. All globes have been sourced from European archive collection originals, researched by AM for their historical accuracy and visual appeal.

      Price: £30.00 Special Price: £22.50


                Comment on Playground Cartography by benign stomach tumor surgery   
      Uterine Fibroids Signs, Prognosis And Remedy Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) is a non-surgical method that shrinks fibroids with out eradicating them. Tiny plastic particles are injected by means of the catheter into uterine arteries to cut the blood provide to the tumor, inflicting the fibroids to shrink. The embolic agent is released into each the best and left uterine arteries by repositioning the same catheter that was initially inserted. Patients taken with pregnancy after therapy may be thought of for UFE, however solely after cautious consideration of the patient's wants and preferences. Harm to different pelvic organs is feasible and the possibility of different significant issues is lower than 1 percent. About 20% of women with fibroids have extreme signs-usually heavy menstrual bleeding and/or pelvic pain or stress. Comply with-up studies show that after therapy with GnRH agonists is stopped, there is regrowth of both the fibroid tumors and the uterus to near-pretreatment dimension, which is commonly associated with the return of fibroid-associated signs. Most often, both uterine arteries could be treated by means of a single catheter insertion. While the fibroids might cross on their own, a D and C may be wanted to take away the tissue. Arteriography is performed ( Determine 1 ), and tiny particles of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), approximately 500 μm in diameter, are injected in a slurry into the artery ( Figure 2a ). The process is repeated in the right uterine artery. Although not reported publicly we assume she has had no troublesome unwanted side effects and experienced relief from her symptoms. In more than 99 percent of fibroid circumstances, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous). Within the recovery room, your care workforce displays your condition and provides you medicine to control any nausea and ache.
                For sale - 1855 Colton Atlas Map Arctic North Pole Genuine... - Auction   

      Plano TX, United States
      This auction is for the extremely rare and 100% original and authentic antique map of the above region, cartographer and year. This auction is only for the map that is pictured in this listing. This is a 100% genuine original antique map. I do not sell copies, posters, reproductions or fakes so you can buy with total confidence that ...
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                Episode 45.0: "Hawks Can Be Jerks, Man"   
      0:00 Intro and Agenda Review 4:10 Housekeeping: Email us! Follow us on Twitter! We got a Facebook Group! 5:36 Email Time! 33:34 Hot and cold starts: Can we get excited yet? 39:26 Josh Hamilton's shoulder and the post-injury blame game 46:57 Sam Fuld is a totally awesome dude so enjoy it while you can 52:51 Early impressions on some big prospect performances 1:10:34 Special Guest: Mike Curto, broadcast voice of the Triple-A Tacoma Rainiers 1:41:16 Listener Of The Week: Derek . . . The Hawk Trap Guy 2:00:49 Musical Guest: Cartographer 2:02:05 What Are You Drinking (includes live tasting) 2:07:59 Pop Culture Moment: Taxi Driver on Blu-Ray (includes more drinking talk) 2:14:40 Wrapping up and the week ahead
                Canadian Model for Peatlands Version 1.0: a model design document.   
      Un projet de modélisation des tourbières boisées de trois ans, financé par l’Entente sur la forêt boréale canadienne, a été développé en réponse à la nécessité d’estimer les gaz à effet de serre à l’échelle nationale dans les vastes tourbières de la région boisée du Canada. Ce document décrit le plan de conception pour une composante du projet : la version 1.0 du Modèle canadien en matière de tourbières (MCaT). La version 1.0 du MCaT sera développée comme module pour le Modèle du bilan du carbone du secteur forestier canadien (MBC-SFC3), qui est utilisé pour répondre aux exigences nationales et internationales de reddition de compte sur les gaz à effet de serre, mais qui ne représente actuellement que les systèmes forestiers des hautes terres. Le MCaT est destiné à simuler les changements et les émissions de stocks de carbone (C) dans les 100 cm supérieurs de la tourbe, qui sont les plus sensibles aux changements climatiques et édaphiques et les plus sensibles aux perturbations anthropiques et naturelles, pour des périodes contemporaines (de 1990 à aujourd’hui) et futures (de 10 à 100 années à venir). Le MCaT sera compatible avec le cadre le plus récent de modélisation du MBC-SFC3 et est conçu pour une application à plusieurs échelles (de l’échelle d’un site et à l’échelle nationale) et pour des approches de modélisation à référence spatiale (en polygones) et spatialement explicite (raster; ≥ 30 m de résolution). Le MCaT permettra de simuler la croissance annuelle et la décomposition des réservoirs vivants et morts de carbone (provenant d’une couche ligneuse [racines, tiges et feuillage], d’une couche de mousse [plume de mousse et de sphaigne] et d’une couche de carex [racines et feuillage]), qui seront ultérieurement transférées à une couche oxique de tourbe (acrotelme), puis à une couche de tourbe saturée d’eau (catotelme). Le MCaT sera étalonné et testé pour 11 catégories de tourbières, représentant différentes combinaisons de couverts forestiers (tourbières forestière, arborée ou ouverte), et de classification de zones humides (tourbières ombrotrophe, minérotrophe pauvre, minérotrophe riche ou marécage). Ces catégories de tourbières seront cartographiées pour le Canada dans un autre volet du projet afin de permettre des estimations à l’échelle nationale des émissions et des éliminations de carbone dans les tourbières. Les émissions de méthane seront modélisées en tant que proportion du total émis de carbone, qui dépend de la profondeur de la nappe phréatique. La version 1.0 du MCaT, décrite ici, sera construite en supposant une nappe phréatique statique estimée pour chaque combinaison de catégories de tourbière et d’écozone. La version 2.0 du MCaT comprendra un tableau d’eau dynamique modélisé en fonction du code de la sécheresse régionale et comprendra des modificateurs d’humidité et de température rattachés aux fonctions de décomposition et de croissance dans le but de fournir des prévisions pour l’avenir des budgets de carbone dans les tourbières en réponse aux changements climatiques, y compris le dégel du pergélisol. Il comprendra également la modélisation des effets perturbateurs naturels et anthropiques.
                Lua Error, WoW 2.2, Cartographer_Trainers-r49725 - Yeah, it would be great...   
      Yeah, it would be great feature. I saw something like this in another addon, but it's too old. Move mouse pointer on every recipe in AH to see do you alt know this recipe or not is not very comfortable.(Interface: Altoholic | Feature: Lua Error, WoW 2.2, Cartographer_Trainers-r49725)
                Vous êtes ici : super-continent de galaxies Laniakea et le Grand Attracteur   

      Apprenez à découvrir notre nouvelle adresse cosmique : Laniakea et ce qui s'y passe en son sein avec le Grand Attracteur qui attire actuellement à lui, tout ce qui est contenu dans l'espace de Laniakea, soit des milliards de galaxies dont la nôtre et phénomène cosmique qui doit transformer la matière en profondeur et y compris à activer notre ADN sous l'influence des puissantes énergies que nous traversons au cours de notre ascension.

      Des scientifiques ont découvert que la Terre recevait des quantités énormes d'énergies et des particules d'antimatière, dont les positons ou positrons, ce dont ils s'étonnent, n'en comprenant pas l'origine et les qualifiant d'anomalies !

      Il ne s'agit pas d'anomalies mais d'une réaction électrique qui engendre la libération d'énergie ou de Lumière Cosmique !

       

      Article précédent :

      * - Vidéo : Oubliez le Réchauffement climatique. Ascension et déménagement de la Galaxie vers le Grand Attracteur de Laniakea !

       

      Notre nouvelle adresse cosmique

      Nouvelle image.jpg


       

      Vous êtes ici : super-continent de galaxies Laniakea

        Une tranche du Superamas Laniakea dans le plan équatorial supergalactique © Cosmic Flows

      Avec une équipe internationale, l’astrophysicienne-cosmographe Hélène Courtois a découvert le super continent de galaxies dans lequel nous vivons: Laniakea.

      Parmi les nombreux obstacles qu’ont rencontrés Christophe Colomb et les explorateurs de l’Amérique, dessiner des cartes précises ne fut pas le plus facile à contourner. A l’époque des grands navigateurs (XVe et XVIe siècles), la cartographie s’appuyait sur l’exploration : longer les côtes pour dessiner les contours du continent, suivre les cours d’eau pour représenter les terres.

      Quelques centaines d’années plus tard, c’est avec une méthode finalement assez proche que la cosmographe Hélène Courtois, de l’Institut national de physique nucléaire et de physique des particules (Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 / CNRS), et trois confrères d’universités internationales* ont cartographié une vaste zone de notre univers observable. Mais leurs cartes à eux sont en quatre dimensions, et cette quatrième dimension vient bouleverser notre représentation de l’Univers.

      Une nouvelle image de l’Univers

      Dans l’Univers tel que le font apparaître les travaux d’Hélène Courtois et ses confrères, des bateaux (les galaxies) suivent les courants d’une rivière (la matière). Les galaxies sont regroupées en amas ou en superamas et se déplacent en évitant de grandes régions appelées “vides”. Leurs déplacements, provoqués par les concentrations de matière visible ou invisible, les amènent à se séparer ou se rassembler comme en suivant l’eau de la rivière de part et d’autre d’une ligne de partage.

      L’équipe internationale assemblée par Hélène Courtois (une vingtaine de chercheurs en plus des quatre co-auteurs de l’article) ont créé des cartes de l’Univers dont le “champ de vitesse” des galaxies constitue la quatrième dimension. Plutôt que produire un instantané de leur position à un instant donné, les cartes montrent la dynamique de leurs déplacements :

      Leur mouvement nous fournit de précieuses indications de cosmologie, par exemple sur la localisation de la matière noire : les mouvements dépendent de sa masse, or nous savons que la matière noire est la masse la plus importante dans l’Univers. Ils nous permettent aussi de mieux comprendre les lois fondamentales de l’univers comme la gravitation.

      Nos horizons célestes

      Les scientifiques ont connecté patiemment la surface joignant toutes les lignes de partage des flux de galaxies qui nous entourent. Notre continent de galaxies, le superamas dans lequel nous vivons, apparaît en creux : c’est le volume englobé, qui se sépare nettement des autres continents voisins. Notre « continent » mesure 500 millions d’années-lumière de diamètre et contient une masse d’environ 100 millions de milliards de fois celle du Soleil. Les chercheurs lui ont donné le nom hawaiien Laniakea, qui signifie “horizons célestes immenses”. Accepté par l’Union Astronomique Internationale, c’est un hommage à ce pays de navigateurs aux étoiles qui abrite désormais quelques-uns des plus grands télescopes du monde, utilisés pour cette découverte et celles qui suivront.

      Une tranche du Superamas Laniakea dans le plan équatorial supergalactique. Les nuances de couleur représentent des valeurs de densité de matière avec en rouge la haute densité et en bleu les vides. Les galaxies individuelles sont montrées comme des points blancs. On observe en blanc des courants de galaxies se déversant dans le bassin d’attraction du Laniakea, tandis que des courants en bleu foncé s’éloignent de ce bassin local et permettent de séparer notre continent de ceux voisins. Le contour orange inclut les limites extérieures de ces courants. Ce domaine a une mesure de 500 Millions d’années lumière de diamètre et inclut ~1017 M⊙ (100 millions de millards de masses solaires). © Cosmic Flows

      Regarder à travers plusieurs lunettes

      Pour arriver à ces résultats, Hélène Courtois et ses partenaires ont mis au point une nouvelle méthode pour définir les structures à grande échelle à l’aide des courants de galaxies. Ces calculs sont basés sur les observations conduites par Hélène Courtois et les méthodes de visualisation de Daniel Pomarède, chercheur à l’Institut de Recherche sur les Lois Fondamentales de l’Univers, CEA/Saclay.

      Ils ont concentré leurs observations sur un cube de 1,5 milliards d’années-lumière de côté, soit environ 2% de l’Univers observable. Ils ont réussi le tour de force de cartographier intégralement 8 000 des galaxies présentes dans cette zone avec une précision de 10-15% : On mesure des vitesses de l’ordre de 1000 à 15000 kilomètres par seconde. Puis nous enlevons de cette mesure la part due à l’expansion de l’Univers : on parle de coordonnées co-mobiles. Il ne reste plus que la vitesse due uniquement à la masse de la galaxie et la gravité environnante, elle de l’ordre de 400 à 600 kilomètres par seconde ”, précise Hélène Courtois. Pour arriver à une précision aussi fine, il est indispensable de croiser les résultats obtenus par plusieurs techniques d’observation : analyse des supernovae et des “raies d’hydrogène neutre”, par exemple (voir encadré).

      Hydrogène neutre : Cette méthode a été co-inventée en 1977 par R. Brent Tully, qui signe l’article avec Hélène Courtois. Elle consiste à observer les traînées d’hydrogène neutre (H pur) des galaxies à l’aide de radiotélescopes : les photons qu’elles émettent sont toujours à 21 cm de longueur d’onde. En vertu de l’effet Dop

                Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa wins Nobel Prize   
      Born in 1936 in Arequipaog, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa has for years been Peru's most acclaimed writer. In the late 1980s he also gained a reputation as a right-wing maverick when he led a mass movement against a decision to nationalize the country''s banks and later ran for the presidency in 1990 as a free market conservative. "His political position stains his literature" were the words of Argentine writer Luisa Valenzuela. The Nobel Prize committee obviously disagreed and cited Mario Vargas Llosa "for his cartography of structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt, and defeat". A complex figure, we quote Vargas Llosa from a 2002 interview about his latest book at that time, The Feast of the Goat:

      What was the inspiration for The Feast of the Goat?

      In 1975, I went to the Dominican Republic for eight months during the shooting of a film based on my novel Captain Pantoja and the Special Service. It was during this period I heard and read about Trujillo. I had the idea of a novel set with this historical background. It's a long project. I went many times to the Dominican Republic to read the papers, and also to interview many people: victims, neutral people and collaborators of Trujillo.

      To what degree is the book really about Alberto Fujimori?

      Well, I think it's a book about Trujillo, but if you write about a dictator you are writing about all dictators, and about totalitarianism. I was writing not only about Trujillo but about an emblematic figure and something that has been experienced in many other societies.

      Particularly in Latin America.

      When I was at university in the Fifties, Latin America was full of dictators. Trujillo was the emblematic figure because, of course, of his cruelty, corruption, extravagance, and theatricalities. He pushed to the extreme trends which were quite common to most dictators of the time.

      The corruption of power.

      Dictators are not natural catastrophes. That's something I wanted to describe: how dictators are made with the collaboration of many people, and sometimes even with the collaboration of their victims.

      Do you have insights into dictatorship from your political experience?

      My three years in politics was very instructive about the way in which the appetite for political power can destroy a human mind, destroy principles and values and transform people into little monsters.

      This novel is written partly from a woman's point of view. Was that a problem?

      A challenge, not a problem. I wanted a woman to be one of the protagonists, because I think women were the worst victims of Trujillo. To his authoritarianism you have to add machismo. Trujillo used sex not only for pleasure but also as an instrument of power. And in this he went far further than many, many other dictators. He went to bed, for example, with the wives of his collaborators.

      Like a Shakespeare play.

      In a way. Coriolanus is a fantastic play about this subject. - from an interview with Mario Vargas Llosa conducted by Robert McCrum and published in The Observer in 2002.

      1 Urania. Her parents had done her no favor; her name suggested a planet, a mineral, anything but the slender, fine-featured woman with burnished skin and large, dark, rather sad eyes who looked back at her from the mirror. Urania! What an idea for a name. Fortunately nobody called her that anymore; now it was Uri, Miss Cabral, Ms. Cabral, Dr. Cabral. As far as she could remember, after she left Santo Domingo (or Ciudad Trujillo -- when she left they had not yet restored the old name to the capital city), no one in Adrian, or Boston, or Washington, D.C., or New York had called her Urania as they did at home and at the Santo Domingo Academy, where the sisters and her classmates pronounced with absolute correctness the ridiculous name inflicted on her at birth. Was it his idea or hers? Too late to find out, my girl; your mother was in heaven and your father condemned to a living death. You'll never know. Urania! As absurd as insulting old Santo Domingo de Guzman by calling it Ciudad Trujillo. Could that have been her father's idea too?

      She waits for the sea to become visible through the window of her room on the ninth floor of the Hotel Jaragua, and at last she sees it. The darkness fades in a few seconds and the brilliant blue of the horizon quickly intensifies, beginning the spectacle she has been anticipating since she woke at four in spite of the pill she had taken, breaking her rule against sedatives. The dark blue surface of the ocean, marked by streaks of foam, extends to a leaden sky at the remote line of the horizon, while here, at the shore, it breaks in resounding, whitecapped waves against the Sea Walk, the Malecón, where she can make out sections of the broad road through the palms and almond trees that line it. Back then, the Hotel Jaragua faced the Malecón directly. Now it's to the side. Her memory brings back the image -- was that the day? -- of the little girl holding her father's hand as they entered the hotel restaurant so the two of them could have lunch together. They were given a table next to the window, and through the sheer lace curtains Urania could see the spacious garden and the pool with its diving boards and swimmers. In the Patio Espanol, surrounded by glazed tiles and flowerpots filled with carnations, an orchestra was playing merengues. Was that the day? "No" she says aloud. The Jaragua of those days had been torn down and replaced by this massive shocking-pink structure that had surprised her so much when she arrived in Santo Domingo three days ago.

      Were you right to come back? You'll be sorry, Urania. Wasting a week's vacation, when you never had time to visit all the cities, regions, countries you would have liked to see -- the mountain ranges and snow-covered lakes of Alaska, for instance -- returning to the island you swore you'd never set foot on again. A symptom of decline? The sentimentality of age? Curiosity, nothing more. To prove to yourself you can walk along the streets of this city that is no longer yours, travel through this foreign country and not have it provoke sadness, nostalgia, hatred, bitterness, rage in you. Or have you come to confront the ruin of your father? To learn what effect seeing him has on you, after so many years. A shudder runs the length of her body. Urania, Urania! What if after all these years you discover that behind your determined, disciplined mind, impervious to discouragement, behind the fortress admired and envied by others, you have a tender, timid, wounded, sentimental heart? - an excerpt from The Feast of the Goat by Mario Vargas Llosa
                Conférence « L’analytique RH au secours de la cartographie des risques RH »   

      Guillaume Pertinant, fondateur et dirigeant de HAVASU, anime le 17 Février prochain à 18h30 dans les locaux de l’ESSEC EXECUTIVE EDUCATION - CNIT PARIS LA DEFENSE la conférence organisée par Jean-Marie Peretti et Hubert Landier pour le club ESSEC RH, l’IAS et le Club de l’Audit Social :   « L’analytique RH au secours de la cartographie des risques RH » L’entreprise est confrontée […]

      Cet article Conférence « L’analytique RH au secours de la cartographie des risques RH » est apparu en premier sur HAVASU.


                The OD Quest: Part 3 – Rendezvous with L&D   
      "I don’t have an opening in my OD team now. But, you can join our recruitment team and do recruitment in the OD way”, I heard the Senior HR Leader telling a candidate who was hell-bent on joining the OD team. This was my fifth ‘encounter’ with this gentleman (See 'Passion for work and anasakti‘, 'Appropriate metaphors for organizational commitment ‘ ,‘To name or not to name, that is the question’ and ‘A Mathematical approach to HR’for the outcomes of my previous interactions with him).

      I was a bit taken aback by what I just heard. I knew that often these kind of ‘solutions’ will end in tears or worse. However, similar to what had happened during my previous encounters with him, this interaction forced me to think a bit more deeply about the underlying issue - the application of OD(Organization Development) to the various functional areas in HR (Human Resource Management). That, in turn, has prompted me to write this series of posts on 'The OD Quest' where we will look at the possibilities  that arise when OD ventures into other parts of the people management terrain.

      In the first post in this series (see The OD Quest: Part 1- Mapping the terrain) we did a cartography of the Human Resources (HR) and Organization Development (OD) domains to map out the current world (the terrain) inhabited by HR and OD and also the evolving worldviews in HR and OD (ways of looking at the terrain). In the second post (see The OD Quest Part 2 : Doing Recruitment in the OD way) we made a visit to the land of Recruitment and explored the value OD can add to Recruitment. In this post, let’s take our OD Quest to one of OD’s closest neighbors – Learning & Development (L&D) also known as ‘Training’ (though the term ‘Training’ is becoming increasingly unfashionable especially for behavioral training)


      OD and L&D (as opposed to OD and Recruitment) are often considered to be siblings or even twins. In some of the organizations they also live in the same house (function) called 'Learning & OD'. When OD becomes more like OE/Organization Effectiveness that focuses more on the 'structural' dimension (e.g. Organization structure, job design, congruence of structural elements, workforce planning etc.) as opposed to the 'human process' dimension and/or when L&D is clubbed with Technical/Functional Training, they are more likely to live apart, in terms of the boxes and arrows in the organization chart, often with unfortunate consequences!

      When it comes to the nature of work, the boundary between OD and L&;D is not often clearly defined (and it varies significantly across organizations). Typically, individual level capability building is considered to be in the L&;D land and group and organization level capability building is considered to be in the OD land. ‘Coaching’ is a hotly disputed territory between OD and L&D. Territorial disputes also erupt when it comes to  ‘change management’/’mindset/culture change’ kind of training.   

      To me, the separation between OD and L&D is arbitrary and counterproductive. Learning’ is defined as ‘sustainable change in behavior’ and OD is about ‘facilitating change’. So, it is very difficult to determine where one ends and the other begins. This is even more true these days when L&D has moved away from being primarily 'event-driven' and OD has moved away from 'conducting isolated ('hit and run')interventions'. Efforts to force a separation between the two often leads to 'things falling through the cracks'. More importantly, this can adversely affect the mutual value addition.

      Let’s look at an example. One of the serious ‘crimes’ committed in the L&D land is that of ‘Training the victim’ where problems at the strategy/structure/process/culture levels are conveniently misdiagnosed as ‘capability issues’ and employees are sent for remedial training to fix their capability gaps (see ‘Training the victim’for details)!  

      A closer partnership between L&D and OD can improve the quality of the diagnosis/need identification and also help in better change management to sustain the ‘change in behavior’ and ‘transfer of learning’ as the OD function often brings in excellent diagnosis and consulting skills. Also ,OD can help a lot in terms of structuring the 70% (on the job learning) part of the 70:20:10 learning model (see ‘Truths stretched too far’ for more details).  Again, ‘Leadership Training’ often degenerates into some sort of ‘Corporate Rain Dance’  (see 'Leadership Training and Corporate Rain Dance' for details). Partnership with OD can help in addressing this also.

      Similarly, large scale OD interventions often involve a lot of capability building where L&D can help. Again the L&D function often brings in significant program management capability that can be leveraged to enhance the effectiveness of the roll out of change management initiatives.

      A closer partnership between L&D and OD also ensures that high impact domains like ‘coaching’ don’t fall through the cracks and that they are effectively addressed. Another key area where the collaboration between OD and L&D can add a lot of value is in enabling employees to transition from one responsibility level to another responsibility level that requires a different mindset in addition to a different skillset(See ‘Accelerated learning & Rites of passage’ for a related discussion).

      So where does this leave us? OD and L&D can add a lot of value to each other. This works best when their ‘natural affinity’ (in terms of nature of work) is maintained in terms of organization structure. Hence an HR organization structure that combines the L&D and OD functions into ‘Learning &OD’ is much more likely to be impactful. This also facilitates better crosspollination of skillsets and a more integrated perspective!

      Any comments/thoughts before we take our OD quest to the next domain in the HR land?!
                The OD Quest: Part 2 – ‘Doing Recruitment in the OD way’!?    
      "I don’t have an opening in my OD team now. But, you can join our recruitment team and do recruitment in the OD way”, I heard the Senior HR Leader telling a candidate who was hell-bent on joining the OD team. This was my fifth ‘encounter’ with this gentleman (See 'Passion for work and anasakti ‘, 'Appropriate metaphors for organizational commitment ‘ ,‘To name or not to name, that is the question’ and ‘A Mathematical approach to HR’ for the outcomes of my previous interactions with him). I was a bit taken aback by what I just heard. I knew that often these kind of ‘solutions’ will end in tears or worse. However, similar to what had happened during my previous encounters with him, this interaction forced me to think a bit more deeply about the underlying issue - the application of OD(Organization Development) to the various functional areas in HR (Human Resource Management). That, in turn, has prompted me to write this series of posts on 'The OD Quest' where we will look at the possibilities  that arise when OD ventures into other parts of the people management terrain. 


      In the first post in this series (see The OD Quest: Part 1- Mapping the terrain) we did a cartography of the Human Resources (HR) and Organization Development (OD) domains to map out the current world (the terrain) inhabited by HR and OD and also the evolving worldviews in HR and OD (ways of looking at the terrain). Now, let us come back to the statement made by our Senior HR Leader – about ‘doing recruitment in the OD way’.  

      Prima facie, OD and Recruitment appear to be ‘strange bedfellows’. Aren’t they at the opposite ends of the spectrum of HR activities in terms of their nature? Isn’t OD supposed to be much more strategic and evolved as compared to Recruitment? Aren’t the skillsets required for OD and Recruitment dramatically different?  However, when I thought about underlying issues a bit more quite a few possibilities started to emerge in addition to paradoxes! The crux of the issue here is ‘What is meant by the OD way?’.  

      While OD is typically defined as a planned effort to increase organization effectiveness using behavioral-science knowledge, the domains that are typically associated with OD are Culture, Vision, Mission Values, Employee Engagement, Coaching, Collaboration, Diversity and Inclusion, dealing with hidden issues  and biases etc. Also the traditional OD approach has been that of action research (the process of systematically collecting data about an ongoing system relative to some need of that system, feeding thee data back into the system, taking action by altering selected variables within the system and evaluating the results of actions). Similarly, while recruitment can be defined as the process of bringing the right talent into the organization, the domains that are typically associated with recruitment are Attracting/sourcing talent, Selection, Offer, Joining and Onboarding.

      Based on the above descriptions, it can be seen that OD can help in increasing the effectiveness of recruitment in many aspects including the following:

      ·    Increasing the person-organization fit (culture fit) during the selection process by mapping and evaluating fit on the relevant cultural and personality dimensions. Culture can be considered to be the personality of the organization and the fit of the personality of the candidate with that of the organization is something that is better addressed at the hiring stage as personalities (both individual and organizational) tend to be relatively stable (resistant to change)
       
      ·    Facilitating enculturation during the onboarding process (enhancing alignment with the organization values, vision and mission)
       
      ·    Ensuring  greater shared understanding of ‘what good looks like’ and hence avoiding unpleasant surprises

      ·    Helping in the formation and effective management of the psychological contract during the  recruitment process (see ‘Of salary negotiationsand psychological contact : before joining’  for more details)

      ·    Solving problems related to the recruitment process like early attrition  (through the action research process mentioned above and by enabling ‘sense making’)

      ·     Dealing with hidden biases in recruitment and thereby building a more diverse and inclusive organization.

      ·   Crystallizing the Employee Value Proposition (EVP) that embodies the essence of the organization to attract the right candidates and repel the wrong candidates.

      ·   Driving ‘bottom up culture change’ by identifying talent with the right ‘cultural DNA’ to be hired into the organization

      Now, it can be argued that all these are integral parts of any good recruitment process. May be, that is exactly the point. OD is essentially a helping profession that enables individuals and groups to become more effective. At a fundamental level, OD is essentially about ‘process consulting’  - helping a client system to diagnose and solve their own problems. May be, we can just say that the application of OD makes recruitment better just like ‘sugar sweetens milk’ in the famous story* about Parsis.


      Let’s come back to our Senior HR professional. What he was really advocating was to look at recruitment through the OD lens. There is a lot of merit in this. However, the danger in this situation was that the candidate might have interpreted it as a back-door entry into OD or might have inferred that there is a mandate to do a major overhaul of the recruitment process.  

      So, where does this leave us? Can Recruitment be done in the OD way?  Yes, and that is just enlightened recruitment using what is considered to be the OD lens and OD skills! With Recruitment moving from 'being more like Procurement' to 'being more like Sales' to 'being more like Marketing', the relevance of the OD lens and the OD skills in Recruitment has definitely increased!

      *The story goes something like this.: Parsis came to India fleeing from persecution in their Motherland Iran and landed in Gujarat. There they approached the local king Jadi Rana and requested asylum. Jadi Rana motioned to a vessel of milk filled to the very brim to signify that his kingdom was already full and could not accept refugees. In response, one of the Parsi priests added a pinch of sugar to the milk, thus indicating that they would not bring the vessel to overflowing and indeed make the lives of the citizens sweeter. Jadi Rana gave shelter to the emigrants and permitted them to practice their religion and traditions freely. Parsis are still adding “sugar” to our lives!

      Any comments/thoughts?!
                The OD Quest : Part 1 - Mapping the terrain!   
      "I don’t have an opening in my OD team now. But, you can join our recruitment team and do recruitment in the OD way”, I heard the Senior HR Leader telling a candidate who was hell-bent on joining the OD team. This was my fifth ‘encounter’ with this gentleman (See 'Passion for work and anasakti ‘, 'Appropriate metaphors for organizational commitment ‘ ,‘To name or not to name, that is the question’ and ‘A Mathematical approach to HR’ for the outcomes of my previous interactions with him). I was a bit taken aback by what I just heard. I knew that often these kind of ‘solutions’ will end in tears or worse. However, similar to what had happened during my previous encounters with him, this interaction prompted me to think a bit more deeply about the underlying issue - the application of OD(Organization Development) to the various functional areas in HR (Human Resource Management). That, in turn, has promoted me to write this series of posts on 'The OD Quest' where we will look at the possibilities that arise when OD ventures into other parts of the people management terrain. 

      In the first post, we will begin by doing some cartography (that is, mapping out the currently known world inhabited by HR and OD). This cartography is not only of the world (terrain). At a more fundamental level, it a also a cartography of the worldviews (ways of looking at the terrain). So we will look at the various 'countries' in the HR world - like Recruitment, Training, Performance Management, Talent Management, Rewards etc. and see what happens when the OD quest reaches those countries. Of course, OD quest will explore the land of OD also,! But we will reach there towards the end of this journey because, as T S Eliot said, "We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time."  Of course, as soon as we make some progress with the cartography, we will venture out into the land of recruitment (in the next post in this series)!

      To proceed further with our cartography (map making), we need to have some sort of working definitions of HR and OD. This is a difficult task as there are so many definitions. For the purpose of our discussion, we will use the following simplified definitions. Organization Development is a planned effort to increase organization effectiveness using behavioral-science knowledge. OD deals with a total system or with a subsystem in the context of the total system. Human Resource Management is about systems and processes aimed to enable the management of people within an organization so as to maximize employee performance (and engagement) in alignment with the strategic objectives of  the organization (See 'Towards a Philosophy of HR' for a deeper discussion).
      So, there is an obvious overlaps in terms of overall objectives. However, when it came to actual tasks, there wasn't much of an  overlap initially, as HR was primarily focused on the basic processes related to people management (like Recruitment, Training, Performance Management, Career Planning, Compensation and Benefits etc.) whereas OD was focused on more 'ethereal' stuff like inter-team and intra-team collaboration, mission/vision/values, culture building, sensitivity training, action research etc. So, HR was mainly a set of regular activities whereas OD was a set of interventions that happened once in a while. But, this has changed quite a lot now.

      These days, HR functions in most of the companies are gravitating towards some variation of the Dave Ulrich model with HR Business Partners(HRBPs), Centres of Excellence (CoEs), HR Shared Services etc. The overlap with OD happens mainly in the HRBP roles - especially when they are supposed to be 'Strategic HR Business Partners' (though what they actually end up doing varies considerably - see  'In the wonderland of HR Business Partners' for more details). Outsourcing of transactional activities in HR is also meant to prompt HR to be more strategic (though it might not always work out like that - see 'Nature abhors vacuum' for more details)

      OD has also evolved from sensitivity training (in 'stranger groups' outside the organization) to sense-making (in 'intact teams' within the organization). Also, the tradition 'Diagnostic OD' (that used the 'action research' methodology to enable organizations to solve their problems) has been supplemented (not replaced!) by 'Dialogic OD' (that takes the organization reality to be 'socially constructed' and uses 'generative metaphors and images' to shape that reality).

      More importantly, the worldviews (of HR and OD) are also converging with HR taking a more 'systemic view' and OD becoming more sensitive to and accountable for the sustainable value added by the OD interventions (as opposed to 'hit and run' OD interventions). Actually, the term 'intervention' no longer seems appropriate for OD work, as OD  work is currently viewed more as a 'dance involving the consultant and the client' as opposed to being some sort of an 'operation' done on (or done to) the client! 
      Hence, there is a growing overlap between HR and OD. A more fundamental question is whether OD should be a CoE within HR or a separate function reporting directly to the CEO. There is no clear answer to this. Metaphorically speaking, whether OD is 'a country in the HR Union' or it is a 'completely independent entity' is a political question on which a referendum needs to be called for (again and again)! The first (OD being part of HR) is the more common scenario as of now, though it creates quite a few tricky challenges for both HR and OD (see 'OD Managers and Court Jesters'). One easy solution is to hire OD expertise from outside. But the question will come back to haunt us in another way - who will take the decision on hiring OD expertise- the HR Head or the CEO!

      So,how should HR and OD respond to this overlap? Obviously,fighting over the disputed territory (however tempting that might be) is not the most effective solution. To me, one solution is for OD to remain a bit of an 'outsider' so that HR can fully be an 'insider'. Being a bit of an outsider helps the OD professional to be more objective (or at least not to have any vested interests) or even to be a bit provocative when required (see 'OD Managers and Court Jesters'). Being an insider allows HR to be fully part of the solution design and implementation. Of course, this calls for a very high level of mutual trust and respect between HR and OD. Also, remaining as an outsider while being a full member of the organization in all aspects is a very tricky 'tightrope walk' for internal OD consultants! Anyway, OD leveraging its marginality and HR leveraging its centrality to add value to the business seems the best possible solution to me. We must keep in mind that the concept of  'Business-orientation of HR' per se is quite paradoxical!
      The above discussion does not complete our cartography. But we have done enough to start our 'OD quest'. It is important to remember that OD can be defined at many the levels (e.g. underlying philosophy and principles, process, tools/techniques, outcomes, skills etc.) and the quest can be done at any/all of these levels. While the story of this quest has been written from the point of view of OD, I have tried very hard not to take sides (I have done both HR and OD roles and I have the highest degree respect for HR professionals - see 'In praise of HR generalists' for more). The objective of the quest is to explore the various domains in HR with the twin objectives of (a) determining what value (if any) can OD add to the domain and (b) figuring out what OD can learn from the domain. Remember, it is a quest and not a conquest!!!
       Any comments/suggestions at this stage before we start our quest (starting with the land of recruitment in the next post)? Please let me know!

                Free Art to the People: Join the #FAFATL Movement    
      Catlantaredo_resize

      Many Twitter-savvy Atlantans are already on board with a little somethin' called #FAFATL. For the rest of you hashtag-haters, it stands for Free Art Fridays Atlanta and it is a wonderful social media-powered movement to deliver free art to the streets and encourage people to explore their home city. (Big shout out to technology on this one.)

      Here’s how it works. An Atlanta street artist will “hide” his or her handicraft somewhere, snap a pic and upload it to Twitter/Facebook/Flickr etc. with a clue to help you divine its location. And so the race begins! Whoever finds the piece first gets to take it home and love it forever. Or keep the hunt going by hiding it again. Sharing is caring, y’all.

      Pro tip: FAFATL doesn’t only apply on Friday. Because the first rule of FAFATL is there are no rules. The second rule is don’t talk about FAFATL. Just kidding, you can totally talk about it. In fact, you probably should talk about it. And tweet about it. And Instagram about it. Whatever it is you do. NO RULES!

      Now you’re probably thinking, okay this is cool… but who do I follow? May we present a Beginner’s List.

      THE MUST-HAVES


      Catlanta, @cat_lanta
      People will go to great lengths to get their hands on adorable wooden kittens. Especially when they’re painted in adorable outfits with a little heart on the front. (Hello, Wes Anderson litter!) Warning: These cuties are usually snatched up within an hour of being posted. Don’t fret if someone gets to the goods before you do. There’s much more to free art than woodcut cats.


      Maplanta, @Map_lanta
      Basically, if you want success as a FAFATL artist, make sure your name ends with -lanta. Not really. Maplanta is pretty awesome at spreadin’ local, cartographic love across the city, though. Plus, they make pieces for all of the ATL’s eccentric little neighborhoods from VaHi to Cabbagetown. Psst, they’re also on Scoutmob Shoppe, ya know, if you’d rather have your art delivered to your door.


      Blockhead, @blockhead_atl
      Step back, Buckhead. Clearly, Blockhead is where it’s at these days. The artist behind Blockhead gets mad props for bringing tons o’ variety to FAFATL. Each blockhead is painted with a different design before going out into the world. The possibilities are endless!

      THE NEWCOMERS


      Thumbs, @thumbs_atl
      Shockingly, the free art thumbs are not shaped like giant thumbs. They’re normally wooden medallions with a carving of a thumbs up instead. Who couldn’t use a little more positive affirmation in their life?


      Lovelock ATL, @lovelockatl
      The artists of Lovelock just want you to love Atlanta as much as they do. You do, don’t you? That’s what we thought. They leave out plastic heart-shaped keyhole ornaments and lockboxes that you can store memories of the city inside of.


      Clunky, @clunkyrobot
      Clunky is more than a piece of free art. He’s got personality. Just look at that lopsided grin! Not to mention a whole mythos including Clunky Drones and intergalactic archenemies known as Deadnauts. What creeps.

      THE OTP AMBASSADOR


      MariARTa, @MariARTa13
      MariARTa’s mission is to bring that Marietta swag ITP. We think it’s great to see more of the Atlanta area represented in the FAFATL game and we love seeing the heart motif being used by more than one artist. We think it gives it that tight community vibe. And that’s what it’s all about.

      Remember, these aren’t all the FAFATL artists. This is just a few to get you started. Trust us when we say that once you find your first piece, you’re gonna want more for your mini art gallery. Better get to it. Ready, set, HUNT!
                Historical Topographic Map Collection bookmark   

      The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the historical scanned maps in 2011, is to provide a digital repository of USGS topographic maps, available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of printed topographic maps, and prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic printing process. As the USGS continues the release of a new generation of topographic maps (US Topo) in electronic form, the topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, land management planning, and leisure.


                Scanning and georeferencing historical USGS quadrangles   

      The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the Historical Topographic Map Collection in 2011, is to provide access to a digital repository of USGS topographic maps that is available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of traditional topographic maps, and, prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic process. The next generation of topographic maps, US Topo, is being released by the USGS in digital form, and newer technologies make it possible to also deliver historical maps in the same electronic format that is more publicly accessible.


                Westminster College Honors Student Heads to National Collegiate Honors Conference in Atlanta, GA   

      Alina Clough, junior honors student at Westminster College, was accepted into the 2017 National Collegiate Honors Conference to be held in Atlanta, GA later this year. Clough will present her poster entitled “Philanthropic Cartography: Crowdmapping Rural Tanzania with OpenStreetMap (OSM).”

      “I am very much looking forward to heading to Atlanta with Dr. Hicok and hope this project is able to shine a bit of light on the technological aspect of development," said Clough.

      In her research project, Clough uses the Tanzania Development Trust as a case study to examine the effectiveness of crowd-sourced mapping technologies as a development tool. 

      “The [Tanzania Development Trust] combines a global network of volunteer mappers with grassroots teams to work with communities in rural Tanzania,” explained Clough. “Using the maps, the Trust helps girls affected by child marriage and female genital mutilation find escape routes to safe homes where they are then provided with vocational training and family counseling.”

      The theme of the conference is “Just Honors,” and will explore justice both as an academic focus and also the role honors can serve in addressing issues of access, equity, and technology in education according to www.nchchonors.org.

      Clough says the emphasis on research is one of the main reasons she loves Westminster.

      “All of the professors here have given me so much support to explore outside of my major through self-guided research,” added Clough.

      Last year, Clough and her classmate Tyler Heintz attended the Northeast Regional Honors Council and presented their astronomy research. Clough and Heintz built a program to project sky maps over Cambridge, Massachusetts up to one million years into the future.

      In the future, Clough hopes to take advantage of Westminster's Yonsei exchange semester to begin learning Korean, and would like to eventually pursue a master's in international political economy.

      For more information, contact Tom Fields at fieldste@westminster.edu or 724-946-7190


                La boîte à outils de la supply chain   
      vignetteLa boîte à outils de la supply chain [Ouvrage] / A. Perrot ; P. Villemus . - Paris (France) : Dunod, 2016 . - 191 p.. - (La Boite à Outils) .ISBN : 978-2-10-075927-9Langues : Français Résumé : Français
      Mots-clés : Catégories principales16 - TRANSPORT. INFRASTRUCTURE. ENERGIE ; 16.1 - TransportThésaurus IAMMCHAINE D'APPROVISIONNEMENT ; GESTION DE LA CHAINE LOGISTIQUE ; LOGISTIQUE ; CHAINE DE VALEURRéseau d'activités faisant l'objet de concurrence dans une industrie donnée et qui contribuent à créer de la valeur pour le client (cf. Porter, avantage concurrentiel des nations, 1993) ; GESTION DE L'ENTREPRISE ; APPROVISIONNEMENT ; DISTRIBUTION ECONOMIQUEDistribution de bien à travers un réseau de vente, pour la répartition naturelle des plantes et animaux, utiliser DISTRIBUTION GEOGRAPHIQUE ; INFRASTRUCTUREServices, équipement et installations nécessaires pour la croissance et le fonctionnement d'un pays, etc... employer un terme plus spécifique si possible
      Résumé : Comment élaborer et exécuter une stratégie Supply Chain ? Comment améliorer la distribution physique ? Comment optimiser la planification opérationnelle ? Comment fiabiliser les prévisions de vente ? Comment mieux servir les clients tout en réduisant les coûts ? Comment bien choisir ses partenaires ? Comment mieux piloter l’entreprise et améliorer ses performances ? Comment gagner du temps ? Découvrez les 63 outils et méthodes indispensables pour aborder toutes les dimensions de la Supply Chain. Traité de façon synthétique et pratique, chaque outil est décrit sur 2 ou 4 pages, comprenant l’essentiel en français et en anglais, les objectifs spécifiques, le contexte d’utilisation, les étapes de mise en oeuvre, les avantages et les précautions à prendre, ainsi que des conseils méthodologiques. Des vidéos, accessibles par QR codes, présentent quelques outils en situation.
      Note de contenu : • Les stratégies Supply Chain (7 outils dont le diagnostic Supply Chain, la cartographie des acteurs...). • Les infrastructures Supply Chain (9 outils dont la décision Make or Buy, les cycles du cash, la gestion des Master Data...). • La distribution physique (7 outils dont la gestion du transport, la logistique inversée, le Cost to serve...). • La planification opérationnelle (9 outils dont la prévision des ventes, la gestion des stocks, le MRP et le plan d'approvisionnement...). • La collaboration Supply Chain (9 outils dont le Value Stream Mapping, les outils collaboratifs de planification, l'ECR...). • Le S&OP (7 outils dont la gestion de la demande, la réunion S&OP, la mise en place d'un S&OP...). • L'excellence Supply Chain (8 outils dont la clockspeed Supply Chain, le Go-to-market management, la Supply Chain Lean, la Supply Chain verte...). • La performance Supply Chain (7 outils dont les profils Supply Chain, la gestion d'un projet Supply Chain, les indicateurs de performance Supply Chain...).
      Cote : L1-PER-2016

                One Word Substitution with Meaning for SSC CGL and Other Competitive Exams   
      One Word Substitution with Meaning for SSC CGL and Other Competitive Exams1. Audience – a number of people listening to a lecture  
      2. Altruist – one, who considers the happiness and well-being of others first
      3. Atheist – a person who does not believe in God
      4. Anthropologist – one, who studies the evolution of mankind
      5. Autocracy – government by one person
      6. Autobiography – the life history of a person written by himself
      7. Amputate – to cut off a part of a person's body which is infected
      8. Arsenal – a place for ammunition and weapons
      9. Archives – a place where government or public records are kept
      10. Amateur – a man who does a thing for pleasure and not as a profession
      11. Aristocracy – government by the nobles
      12. Aquatic – animals/plants ere which live in water
      13. Amphibian – animals which live both on land and sea
      14. Ambidexter – one, who can use either hand with ease
      15. Alimony – allowance paid to wife on legal separation
      16. Anthology – a collection of poems
      17. Abdication – voluntary giving up of throne in favour of someone
      18. Arbitrator – a person, appointed by two parties to solve a dispute
      19. Astronomer – a person, who studies stars, planets and other heavenly bodies
      20. Astrologer – a person who studies the influence of heavenly bodies on human beings
      21. Anthology – a collection of poems
      22. Axiom – a statement which is accepted as true without proof
      23. Agenda – a list of headings of the business to be transacted at a meeting
      24. Anarchist – one, who is out to destroy all governance, law and order
      25. Almanac – an annual calender with positions of stars
      26. Bigamy – the practice of having two wives or husbands at a time
      27. Bibliophile – a lover and collector of books
      28. Bouquet – a collection of flowers
      29. Bureaucracy – government by the officials
      30. Belligerent – a person, nation that is involved in war
      31. Biennial – an event which happens once in two years
      32. Blasphemy – the act of speaking disrespectfully about sacred things
      33. Creche – a nursery where children are cared for while their parents are at work
      34. Cosmopolitan – a person who regards whole world as his country
      35. Chauffeur – one, who is employed to drive a motor car
      36. Curator – a person incharge of a museum
      37. Carnivorous – one, who lives on flesh
      38. Cannibal – one, who feeds on human flesh
      39. Contemporaries – belonging to or living at the same time
      40. Cloak room – a place for luggage at railway station
      41. Cynosure – centre of attraction
      42. Connoisseur – a critical judge of any art and craft
      43. Crusade – a religious war
      44. Choreographer – one, who teaches dancing
      45. Cacographist – a person, who is bad in spellings
      46. Calligraphist – a person, who writes beautiful handwriting
      47. Cynic – one, who sneers at the aims and beliefs of his fellow men
      48. Convalescent – one, who is recovering health
      49. Cavalry – soldiers, who fight on horse back
      50. Cardiologist – a person, who is specialist in heart diseases
      51. Cartographer – one, who draws maps
      52. Dormitory – the sleeping rooms with several beds especially in a college or institution
      53. Drawn – a game that results neither in victory nor in defeat
      54. Elegy – a poem of lamentation
      55. Epitaph – words which are inscribed on the grave or the tomb in the memory of the buried
      56. Ephemeral – lasting one day
      57. Effeminate – a person who is womanish
      58. Emigrant – a person who leaves his own country and goes to live in another
      59. Edible – fit to be eaten
      60. Egotism – practice of talking too much about oneself
      61. Encyclopaedia – a book that contains information on various subjects
      62. Epicure – one, who is devoted to the pleasure of eating and drinking
      63. Florist – one, who deals-in flowers
      64. Fastidious – one, who is very -selective in one's taste
      65. Fanatic or Bigot – one, who is filled with excessive and mistaken enthusiasm in religious matters
      66. Fatal – causing death
      67. Fatalist – one, who believes in fate
      68. Facsimile – an exact copy of handwriting, printing etc
      69. Fauna – the animals of a certain region
      70. Flora – the plants of a particular region
      71. Fratricide – murder of brother
      72. Fugitive – one, who runs away from justice or the law
      73. Fragile – easily broken
      74. Feminist – one, who works for the welfare of the women
      75. Granary – a place for grains
      76. Genocide – murder of race
      77. Gregarious – animals which live in flocks
      78. Hangar – a place for housing aeroplanes
      79. Hive – a place for bees
      80. Horticulture – the art of cultivating and managing gardens
      81. Homicide – murder of man
      82. Hearse – a vehicle which is used to carry a dead body
      83. Hedonist – one, who believes that pleasure is the chief good (sensual)
      84. Horizon – a line at which the earth and the sky seem to meet
      85. Honorary – holding office without any remuneration
      86. Heretic – one, who acts against religion
      87. Herbivorous – one, who lives on herbs
      88. Insolvent/Bankrupt – a person who is unable to pay his debts
      89. Inaudible – a sound that cannot be heard
      90. Inaccessible – that cannot be easily approached
      91. Incorrigible – incapable of being corrected
      92. Irreparable – incapable of being repaired
      93. Illegible – incapable of being read
      94. Inevitable – incapable of being avoided
      95. Impracticable – incapable of being practised
      96. Immigrant – a person who comes to one country from another in order to settle there
      97. Invincible – one, too strong to be overcome
      98. Indelible – that cannot be erased
      99. Incognito – travelling under another name than one's own
      100. Indefatigable – one, who does not tire easily
      101. Infallible – one, who is free from all mistakes and failures
      102. Invigilator – one, who supervises in the examination hall
      103. Itinerant – one, who journeys from place to place
      104. Infirmary – a home or room used for ill or injured people
      105. Infanticide – murder of an infant
      106. Infantry – soldiers, who fight on foot
      107. Inflammable – liable to catch fire easily
      108. Interregnum – a period of interval between two reigns or governments
      109. Kennel – a place for dogs
      110. Lunatic asylum – a home for lunatics
      111. Lexicographer – one, who compiles a dictionary
      112. Loquacious – one, who talks continuously
      113. Linguist – one, who is skilled in foreign languages
      114. Lapidist – one, who cuts precious stones
      115. Misanthrope – a hater of mankind
      116. Misogamist – one, who hates marriage
      117. Mortuary – a place, where dead bodies are kept for post mortem
      118. Mercenery – working only for the sake of money
      119. Matricide – murder of mother
      120. Martyr – one, who dies for a noble cause
      121. Maiden speech – the first speech delivered by a person
      122. Mint – a place where coins are made
      123. Misogynist – a hater of womankind
      124. Morgue – a place, where dead bodies are kept for identification
      125. Mammals – animals which give milk
      126. Monogamy – the practice of marrying one at a time
      127. Missionary – a person, who is sent to propagate religion
      128. Numismatics – the study of coins
      129. Namesake – a person having same name as another
      130. Nostalgia – a strong desire to return home, home sickness
      131. Novice or Tyro – one, new to anything, inexperienced
      132. Narcotic – a medicine for producing sleep
      133. Optimist – a person who looks at the brighter side of things
      134. Orphan – one, who has lost parents
      135. Omnipresent – one, who is present everywhere
      136. Omnipotent – one, who is all powerful
      137. Omniscient – one, who knows everything
      138. Opaque – that which cannot be seen through
      139. Obituary – an account in the newspaper of the funeral of the one deceased
      140. Orphanage – a home for orphans
      141. Obstetrician – one, who is skilled in midwifery
      142. Ostler – one, who looks after horses at an inn
      143. Omnivorous – one, who eats everything
      144. Pessimist – a person who looks at the darker side of things
      145. Potable – fit to drink
      146. Post mortem – an examination of dead body
      147. Philanthropist – a lover of mankind
      148. Patricide – murder of father
      149. Philatelist – one, who collects stamps
      150. Plagiarism – literary theft or passing off an author's original work as one's own
      151. Polygamy – the practice of marrying more than one wife at a time
      152. Polyandry – the practice of marrying more than one husband at a time
      153. Philogynist – a lover of womankind
      154. Plebiscite – (a decision made by) votes of all qualified citizens
      155. Philanderer – one, who amuses himself by love making
      156. Philistine – one who does not care for art and literature
      157. Plutocracy – government by the rich
      158. Pseudonym – an imaginary name assumed by an author for disguise
      159. Posthumous – a child born after the death of his father or the book published after the death of the writer
      160. Panacea – a remedy for all diseases
      161. Paediatrician – a person, who is specialist in child diseases
      162. Platitude – ordinary remarks often repeated
      163. Pedant – one, who makes a vain display of his knowledge
      164. Polyglot – one, who speaks many languages
      165. Paleography – the study of ancient writing
      166. Posse – a number of policemen called to quell a riot
      167. Parole – pledge given by a prisoner for temporary release, not to escape
      168. Pedestrian – one, who goes on foot
      169. Portable – that can be carried easily
      170. Quarantine – an act of separation from other persons to avoid infection
      171. Rhetoric – the art of elegant speech or writing
      172. Regicide – murder of King or Queen
      173. Sacrilege – violating or profaning religious things/places
      174. Sculptor – one, who cuts in stones
      175. Suicide – murder of oneself
      176. Stable – a place for horses
      177. Somnambulist – a person, who walks in sleep
      178. Somniloquist – a person, who talks in sleep
      179. Souvenir – a thing kept as a reminder of a person, place or event
      180. Swan song – the last work (literary) of a writer
      181. Sot, Toper – one, who is a habitual drunkard
      182. Sinecure – a job with high salary but little responsibility
      183. Stoic – a person, who is indifferent to pleasure and pain and has control over his passions
      184. Sanatorium – a place for the sick to recover health
      185. Sororicide – murder of sister
      186. Triennial – an event which happens once in three years
      187. Truant – a person/student who absents himself from class or duty without permission
      188. Teetotaller – one, who does not take any intoxicating drink
      189. Transparent – that which can be seen through
      190. Theocracy – government by religious principles
      191. Uxorious – one extremely fond of one's wife
      192. Utopia – an imaginary perfect social and political system
      193. Uxoricide – murder of wife
      194. Verbatim – repetition of speech or writing word for word
      195. Volunteer – one, who offers one's services
      196. Virgin – a woman who has no sexual experience
      197. Versatile – interested in and clever at many different things
      198. Veteran – one, who has a long experience of any occupation
      199. Venial – a fault that may be forgiven
      200. Wardrobe – a place for clothes 



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