[VIDEO] Hinchas haitianos emocionaron a todos con esta notable reacción por triunfo de Chile   
Jean Beausejour es su ídolo. La comunidad haitiana es una de los grupos de inmigrantes que más crecimiento ha tenido en nuestro país, por lo que ya se sienten como uno más de Chile y vibraron con el paso de la Roja a la final de la Copa Confederaciones. Y se sienten tan hinchas del […]
          Contribution des activités touristiques au développement territorial : une étude cas de la commune de Port-Salut.   
par Charly Camilien VICTOR Universite d'Etat d'Haiti 2016
          Ci vuole calma?   

https://haitianbarbiek.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/thinking-guy.jpg

E' vero che quando ci sono delle trattative non bisogna perdere la calma, però non ci si deve neanche prendere per i fondelli.

Sabato scorso ho modificato la nuova offerta così come avevo anticipato telefonicamente il martedì prima. Di quell'offerta non è stata cambiata la data, per cui oggi scadono i termini. Ad oggi nessuno si è fatto vivo in un modo o nell'altro.

"Dovremmo spostare un po' i tempi" diceva la ragazza dell'agenzia, ma ai miei dubbi aveva risposto "giovedì contatterò la proprietà e ti farò sapere. Ebbene non si è fatto vivo nessuno. Anzi qualcuno si è fatto vivo: la casa alternativa a questa è stata venduta, me l'ha comunicato la proprietaria lasciandomi in in mare di tristezza. Sapere di avere un'alternativa valida mi rendeva felice e invece.

Ora non so che fare: probabilmente in tarda mattinata contatterò l'agenzia visto che hanno un mio assegno in mano e chiederò loro che intenzioni hanno.

Intanto la prossima settimana siamo a luglio e io non ho ancora quagliato

Amoon depresso


          Karl Racine '89, First Elected Attorney General for the District of Columbia, Discusses His Career Path   
Streaming Audio Audio icon 16_02_19_racine.mp3

District of Columbia Attorney General Karl A. Racine discusses his path into public office as a first-generation Haitian immigrant whose legal career spans work as a public defender and White House attorney to managing partner of a large D.C. firm.


          Gildan Releases Its 2016 CSR Report    

(Marketwire) Gildan Activewear Inc. (GIL; TSX and NYSE) has released its 2016 corporate, social and environmental responsibility (CSR) report on the Company’s dedicated CSR website genuinegildan.com. The report is aligned with the new Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standards, offering a comprehensive online review on the progress of Gildan’s commitments to its people, communities, the environment and products. 

“As one of the world’s largest manufacturers of apparel and socks, we understand that operating responsibly and integrating sustainable solutions drives our success and enables our future growth,” said Glenn Chamandy, President and CEO, Gildan. “Providing good working conditions for our employees, improving the communities where we operate and pursuing continuous improvements to reduce our impacts on future generations is at the foundation of our commitment.”

Making Apparel Better™

As a large scale vertically-integrated manufacturer, Gildan is able to maintain strict control over the conditions under which its products are manufactured. Close to 90% of Gildan’s revenues are derived from products that are manufactured in Company-owned and operated facilities. “Gildan was founded on the vision that owning its factories, investing in technology and pursuing continuous improvements was the best way to operate and to make better products,” said Glenn Chamandy. “Our continued investments in our vertical integration are at the foundation of our business strategy and the key to our ability to positively influence every part of the overall production process including all activities across our four CSR pillars: People, Environment, Community and Product,” he added.

Navigating the road towards Gildan’s 2020 environmental goals

In 2016, Gildan demonstrated good progress towards its 2020 environmental goals which call for a 10% reduction in energy, water, GHG emissions and landfill waste intensity, per kg of product, from owned operations, when compared to the 2015 baseline year.

In 2016, Gildan’s efficiency initiatives resulted in a reduction of its energy intensity by 10% and water intensity by 5%. The Company increased its industrial and domestic recycling programs globally to now recycle or repurpose 86% of total waste. Additionally, the Company powered 32% of its energy needs by renewable resources.

The Company is continuing to integrate manufacturing capacity from recent acquisitions and is firmly committed to meeting its 2020 GHG goal, by pursuing various initiatives including increasing its use of renewable resources such as biomass. The Company has a number of projects in research and development that hold promise to help meet its 2020 goals, and propel it along the next phase of its environmental journey.

Investments in Local Communities

As part of its commitment to Making Apparel BetterTM, Gildan has contributed close to $2 million towards projects in local communities in the U.S., Canada and Latin America in 2016. Some of these projects include:

  • The construction of a new infant ward for the Mario Catarino Rivas Hospital in Honduras which provides care and services to more than 3,000 infants annually. The newly expanded ward will not only reduce overcrowding at the hospital, but also help to lower mortality rates.

  • A partnership with World Vision Honduras for the “Building Safe and Healthy Environments for Children” program. In addition, Gildan made a commitment with the Ministry of Education to fully sponsor renovation projects for 10 schools in the Sula Valley, improving the school conditions for approximately 4,000 children.

  • Over 450 scholarships awarded to Gildan employees and community members to attend professional and vocational schools in Canada, the U.S. and Latin America.

  • Relief to communities in need due to several weather-related disasters that created difficult situations for residents:

    • Gildan donated to UNICEF and Americares for the relief efforts in Haiti following Hurricane Matthew, as well as provided food and water kits to the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.
    • During the Fort McMurray, Alberta wildfires, the Company donated clothing items, including sweatshirts, t-shirts, underwear and socks to the over 88,000 evacuees. 
    • Gildan responded to the call for basic necessities for the families displaced by the Louisiana, USA floods, with the distribution of products including t-shirts, socks and underwear though the St. Vincent of Paul Society.

Recognition and Awards

In recognition of Gildan’s efforts to distinguish itself in the apparel industry through its CSR efforts, Gildan was again included on the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index (DJSI World Index) for the fourth consecutive year.  The Company remains the only North American company in the Textiles, Apparel and Luxury Goods industry group listed in the DJSI World Index. 

In Latin America, Gildan was recognized with a Distintivo ESR 2016 award for the first time, presented by the Mexican Center for Philanthropy (Cemefi) and the Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility (Aliarse).  This award is presented to companies that are considered leaders in their corporate social responsibility efforts.   

Contacts:
Investor inquiries:
Sophie Argiriou
Vice President, Investor Communications
(514) 343-8815
sargiriou@gildan.com

Media inquiries:
Garry Bell
Vice President, Corporate Marketing and Communications
(514) 744-8600
gbell@gildan.com
www.gildancorp.com


          Fugitive Arraigned In 2011 Double Murder   
Jean Weevens Janvier was arrested in Haiti earlier this month. He was brought back to Boston to face two counts of first-degree murder.
          World Slavery: The Haitian Revolution and the Rise of American Music, with musician Ray Kamalay   

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month!

A Discussion & Musical Performance with Ray Kamalay

read more


          APAP concluye mes del medio ambiente con documental “Muerte por mil cortes”   

Con el documental “Muerte por mil cortes”, la Asociación Popular de Ahorros y Préstamos (APAP) cerró el ciclo de actividades dedicadas al mes del medio ambiente, realizado para crear conciencia sobre el uso responsable y eficiente de los recursos naturales.

Jake Kheel, líder en desarrollo sostenible y vicepresidente de la Fundación Grupo Puntacana, compartió su experiencia como productor y co director del documental, que aborda la producción de carbón vegetal en bosques de la frontera domínico-haitiana, uno de los principales conflictos socioeconómicos y ambientales del país.

La entrada APAP concluye mes del medio ambiente con documental “Muerte por mil cortes” aparece primero en Argentarium.


          Noteworthy News Article (esp read the bottom!)   
http://www.examiner.com/x-17373-Phoenix-Si
gns-of-the-Times-Examiner~y2010m1d26-H
elping-Haiti-Give-generously-but-wisely

This is very interesting. It will help you to appreciate how different Jehovah's organization is from the others.
          La ONU llevó el cólera a Haití y no ha podido controlar el brote   

Aproximadamente 10.000 haitianos han muerto y cerca de un millón han enfermado desde que integrantes nepalíes de las fuerzas del mantenimiento de paz de las Naciones Unidas, que estaban infectados, introdujeron la bacteria al país caribeño en 2010. Los estudios mostraron que la bacteria del cólera provino de instalaciones sanitarias descuidadas usadas por los integrantes de la misión de la ONU.

etiquetas: onu, colera, haiti, brote, enfermedad, mortal, naciones, unidas

» noticia original (www.nytimes.com)


          Ciera Foster on becoming Livewire, Ninjak Vs, and the Future (Toylab Exclusive Interview)   

Please Share and Follow us on Twitter!





Toylab bloggers have made no secret that they are excited about the direction of Valiant Entertainment. With the launch of X-O Manowar comic, the upcoming Secret Weapons series and of course the upcoming live action Ninjak vs the Valiant Universe. We are thrilled to bring you an interview with one of the star's from Ninjak vs. the Valiant Universe, Ciera Foster. Ciera Foster is playing one of my favorite Valiant characters, Livewire. When casting for Ninjak vs was going on I openly wondered if they would find an actress who could portray the mixture of intelligence and bad assness that is Livewire and with Ciera they just flat out nailed it. She is intelligent, beautiful, and a good person as well. On top of all that she brings a legit athletic and martial arts resume to the table. Toylab's Marvel Matt sought out Ciera on questions about playing Livewire and she kindly answered.

If you love Valiant, if you are curious about Ninjak vs. The Valiant Universe then you need to read this interview. Ciera has an infectious enthusiasm for playing Livewire that has pushed my excitement for seeing her in action to 11.
Divinity #0 - Ciera Foster - Livewire Cover

As part of highlighting the Ninjak vs film Valiant is releasing a series of variant covers featuring the actors.  The Ciera Foster - Livewire cover will come out with Divinity #0.  It looks amazing!




Please Follow Ciera Foster on Twitter and Instagram:


Ciera we are very excited to see you play Livewire in Ninjak vs. the Valiant Universe.  What was the first thing that excited you as an actress about playing Livewire?

Firstly, thank you and the enthusiasm is certainly mutual!!! Thinking how to respond to that question is a bit tricky because it's a loaded answer. - The first thing that comes to mind is hands down the simple fact that I am a comic book, cartoon, video game fan. Yes, ME!!! I grew up with my older brother Nick and my guy cousins Keion and Cedric and we practically lived (and still do I might add) all things superhero,... seriously! But that's just the tip of the iceberg. I love playing Livewire not only because of what she is "a superhero" but because of WHO she is. Livewire is a natural leader with boundless compassion yet yields uncompromising strength. She's both admired and respected and hates wrongdoing particularly at the cost of the defenseless. Daily I'm blown away at the blessing of playing this character whose values are so aligned with my own. She continues to amaze me. With my background in athletics and my previous and current endeavors in the humanitarian field I couldn't have written a better character for me to play, which is a credit to the founding creators and the current exceptional team of writers working for and with Valiant.


 Speaking of Valiant I legitimately cannot answer this question without acknowledging how thrilled I am (Not to mention damn proud) to be a part of the Valiant Universe. I know I could easily sound biased but the fact is the more anyone delves into Valiant the more apparent it will be that there is no other major super universe with as much diversity in character, craftsmanship, and artistry plus overall badassness. From Harbinger, to Faith, to Bloodshot to one of my favorites Britannia (Just to name a few). I mean seriously it doesn't get more diverse than that! No slight on other comic universes but Valiant isn't creating a league of its own, it already is one. People are just seeing it on a larger scale and that makes me pretty damn excited to be your Livewire.


Livewire is the star of a comic series coming out called Secret Weapons have you been able to get a preview of that?

Valiant does a phenomenal job of providing us plenty of material. But it's no secret as Valiant continues to get bigger and bigger that our CEO Dinesh Shamdasani and VP of marketing Hunter Gorinson have made secrecy Valiant's "Secret Weapon" (See what I did there...) - I have a bit of a preview on the way from H.Q. but the hard hitting stuff I get to read with everyone else, which is cool with me. I get to share the journey as a fan and with the fans. I think that's important as an artist especially when playing a comic book character to be along for the ride at the same pace. Otherwise it's easy to project stuff onto to the scene or character that hasn't happened. Which I feel does everyone an injustice. - I've certainly done my research and since the book is about the emergence of the Harbinger program, I'm just as excited as the Valiant fans.

Livewire may seem like the star but I believe my character has the honor of being somewhat of a guiding force for some incredible new characters that will be introduced. I personally love that. It is my understanding Secret Weapons conceptually challenges the notion of being a "misfit". I believe the world could use a little more of that these days.

The Bat and the Sun is producing the series how did you meet them and get the part as Livewire?
Ciera Foster playing Livewire in Ninjak vs the Valiant Universe

Pure hustle. I went to audition almost two years ago for a role I submitted myself for. It was an extremely small, low budget, independent project. I have managers and agents of course but I like to search out new creative challenges for myself (Maybe that is the artist/athlete in me) because the role was pretty controversial and the project as I stated didn't pay much. I'd just gotten back from holiday, when I received the callback and I was pretty tired but I love what I do and I don't miss auditions so I went happily and did my thing. - I didn't get the part lol!

Apparently, I just wasn't right for the role, but the director liked my energy and work. He looked at my resume and said, "I gotta ask you about your martial arts and athletic background..." I filled him and the assistant CD in. Per usual I started geeking out over my love for superheroes. He told he might have a referral for me. I left and that was that. I had no expectations. I actually forgot until months later I got a phone call from Aaron Schoenke to play Storm for Bat in the Sun's Wonder Woman vs. Wolverine. After about 5 minutes of me talking about Ororo Munroe's history a little Street Fighter, Dragon Ball Z, Sailor Moon and a dash of Mortal Kombat I got the part. Almost a year later I got another phone call out of the blue from Aaron, I remember his exact words.

"Are you available next month to work? ... There is a thing...Its cool....really cool....you'll like it...I can't tell anything else but if you interested I think you should audition for it....that's all I can say.  I'll be in touch."

Yep, it was at that moment for exactly 17 seconds I thought I'd finally got the call to be a real life spy LOL. Auditioning for Livewire was actually not too far off. A week later I got another call then another with limited info. I was sent audition sides (1-2 pages of material) I was told to send them back the same day as soon as possible. Reading the small bit of information I was given about the character (Still almost nothing not even a mention of Valiant) I had to make choices based off of a combination of training and instinct. I even overrode some of the direction I was given. As I worked on it with my older brother Nick we let our knowledge and passion of superheroes guide us. We had so little info we worked on it all over about three hours straight (discussing it constantly) until it felt right. I sent in my taped audition to Aaron and Sean at Bat in the Sun. After that Bat in the Sun sent it to Valiant in New York. About ten minutes later Aaron texted me I got the part - No better feeling. I know I didn't know someone, there were no favors, just my hard work paying off step by step. The best woman got the job. I was (am) Livewire.

The Valiant Universe is full of bad asses and Livewire is one of the biggest bad asses of them all, what was it like to film action sequences in Ninjak vs. The Valiant Universe? 


What a fun question. It's literally a dream come true. As long as I can remember I've pretended to be a superhero, ninja, secret agent, etc. This is a lot cooler because its for real! I LIVE for this stuff! As you mentioned being such a powerful character one of the most powerful in the entire Valiant Universe especially as a woman is beyond exhilarating. When we film the fight scenes in particular I enter into a whole other zone. It's like a shark when they smell blood ...Was that too crazy LOL. I spent ample time on set not only on Livewire as a character but her characteristics in combat which is a huge part of the storytelling. As an artist but above all as a fan, I can tell a lot about character by the way they fight. I think a lot of comic hero heads would agree.

I fused my knowledge of the character with martial arts, artistry, and comics together to give Livewire an action personality that is so dynamic. I truly hope our fans and viewers enjoy watching it as much as I enjoyed portraying it. Ultimately, a large part of Livewire is her fighting because that’s when you see how powerful she is when it all becomes unleashed. It gives me chills just thinking about it!

None of it would be possible without the involvement of the Valiant heads Dinish Shamdasani (CEO) and Joshua Johns (Dir. of Digital Media / Development) giving me the freedom to be an artist and working so collaboratively with Bat in the Sun. All of the fights in Ninjak Vs would be a nothing without the full cast and crew (Seriously you've seen our cast, athletes for days.) Credit is especially due to our director Aaron Schenoke he was born to create epic fight and action sequences. The direction let alone the vision of Aaron and his father Sean Schenoke combined is priceless. Lastly, but certainly not least our special affects composer Nikolay Zamkovoy is just a beast and creative genius that kills it every time.

You were an NCAA athlete and have trained heavily in martial arts.  Can you go into you're training in martial arts and did that help you land this role.


My dad is a 7th degree black belt and Tang Soo Do master. He was also sparring partners with the legendary Chuck Norris. My father trained me in his dojo where I had to attend classes until I was about eleven. We also trained at the park outside of class. After a break my mother kept me involved in Taekwondo and Karate. When I was twelve I was recruited to play basketball. I traded theater club at the time for basketball practice in hopes of earning a scholarship. I played basketball for eleven years straight including competitive national and international summer leagues. As my skills developed I began to only play "up" on teams with athletes older than me. The same happened in high school by the end of my freshmen year I was on varsity already and playing in regional finals. Club or school ball I was always on regional, sectional, or state championship teams. I also played competitive softball two years, track and field for three years (undefeated), and was recruited to play volleyball at the collegiate level. More often than not I was the captain on many of my teams especially through college. I was a COAA California State Championship finalist. From there I was recruited to SoCal where I became an NCAA athlete and received a scholarship to play basketball.

Afterwards I returned to martial arts mainly Taekwondo testing for my black belt, while also pursuing my acting career. During both regular school and acting school I also attended two film fighting schools. I attended Theatrical Academy of Combat under the instruction of Dan and Jan Spreaker who choreographed the films Hook and Master and Commander. There I learned my film fighting foundation and weapons technique. My best weapons are the broad sword, quarter staff, and the cutlass. After that I attended Film Fighting LA under the instruction of Robert Goodwin who helped train Robert Downey Jr. in Iron Man. There was a big emphasis of the three points of Shaolin Kung Fu Martial Arts Method which I fell in love with. The school incorporated several art forms of camera fighting, stunt work, wrestling and firearms.   I've also had to do various training for a variety of roles and I still take classes and workshops. I will never stop learning and improving, I love this expression of the body and I'm blessed with the physicality to do something dynamic with it.

What does it feel like to join the ranks of Super Heroes? Playing Livewire makes you into a role model how does that change your mindset?

Playing Livewire doesn't change my mindset in regard to being a role model its quite the opposite, it affirms it. I've always had something inside of me pushing me to help others and to inspire. Its simple really, acting is my passion but helping others is my purpose. As I reflect on my career and life up to this point it adds up to this moment, this platform. When I was in college I was a paid activist for the CAA California Teachers Association I fought for educational rights, teacher rights and fair tuition costs. I was one of three student activist ambassadors hired by the CAA to represent SQE Students for Quality Education in which I was trained on activism techniques and school reform. My job was to bridge the gap between legislation and student rights.

In athletics as an NCAA athlete I was the captain and placed in charge of the team community service out reach programs. As an artist I've been to Haiti as an ambassador to Artists for Peace and Justice founded by writer/director Paul Haggis. I'm also an ambassador for the Water Underground Project and supporter of Children International. Now more than ever I feel these experiences have been part of a greater purpose which supersedes fame and popularity and has everything to do with passion. 
I say all this only to make the point that now I am Livewire,  I am just getting started. Be it a student athlete captain, activist, ambassador, acting class, or even growing up at home I've always been held to a higher standard. Livewire just raised the bar. I'm apart of something much bigger than myself.   As you stated I realize that makes me a role model, especially for little girls and young women. Challenge Accepted.

There have not been many black female super heroes in live action media?  Halle Berry comes to mind as Storm in X-Men but mind is drawing blanks on others.  At any rate it is a very small club of actresses that you are joining, does that add meaning to portrayal of Livewire.

I know what this means and I don't take it for granted. I'm humbled and honored, I think about it daily. People write me and post things about me regarding that very point. It's a blessing and a privilege. I always wanted to be a superhero but besides Storm there were no other heroes in all of the great universes that looked like me. It was a bit disheartening as a kid. Naturally, I assumed I'd play Storm if there ever were a Strom Origins film developed. This was my goal. By the way Alexandra Shipp is killing that role. But I realize now I was only thinking at the level of what I was shown possible. In the emerging age of the female lead heroine / superhero and with me as Livewire as a lead female superhero of color I take great pride and happiness in knowing that girls and boys of all races and backgrounds will see me and other upcoming heroes, and know that anything is possible. The best part is one day it won't even be a thought and the word "Black" or "Female" hero won't be a big deal. We will all just be superheroes from all walks of life representing everyone. That said let me clearly say in this moment in time I'm extremely proud to hold the torch for both female heroines and heroes of color until the goal of visibility amongst both is reached.

What is the future of Livewire?  We know that Valiant has a variety of film projects in the future.  Will Ninjak vs. The Valiant Universe lead to role in those projects?

All I can say is that I'm blessed to be a part of something very special. I'm the face of Livewire for the first time, ever. To be so well received playing a character that was seemingly physically designed for me and virtually my whole life has been preparing me to play is pure joy. I'm certainly enjoying every minute of it. Since my character reveal and trailer premier/panel discussion at NYC Comic Con reception and the over all presence of this remarkable character continuing to expand. As you noted for the first time since the dawn of Valiant a series highlighting Livewire is being released now in Secret Weapons. That's major. Additionally, you mentioned its no secret Valiant is developing films. Eric Heisserer the Oscar nominated screen writer for Arrival not only wrote Secret Weapons but is writing the Harbinger film as well. To me what that says for not only the future of my character but the future of Valiant Comics and comics period is not lost on me. Playing Livewire as an artist (Especially a woman) being considered a fan-favorite character and being a fan myself means the world to me. I would love to play Livewire in the Harbinger films. I am Livewire. I was born to do this. I also look forward to continue to expanding and growing with the fans. We have the best fans hands down, period. I feel we are in this journey together and I mean that with everything in me. - Ninjak is something special, the Valiant Universe is special. The fans are beyond special. Valiant Entertainment / Valiant Digital are doing amazing things in both entertainment and comics. Valiant is so creative they plan things out far in advance. I think we will just have to stay tuned to see what unfolds.

What is the coolest moment you have had at a Convention since becoming Livewire?

When Bobby Leet a father of two recognized me walking around Comic Con NYC during my press day. The trailer and character reveal were not until the following day but he was such a big Valiant fan that he already knew who I was and asked for a picture. That memory sticks out to me as clear as day. He was the first one, we still follow each other on Instagram. By far to me the most impactful moment was the next day at the trailer premier and panel discussion. A guy (granted he was dressed as Armstrong lol) came up to me with tears in his eyes. He said he'd grown up reading the original Valiant Comics when he was a kid. He was so overwhelmed he could barely talk. He said Livewire was one of his favorite characters and he was emotional because I was everything he'd imagined her to be and more. The man said my being Livewire and the entire Ninjak Vs. experience was overwhelming and surreal for him. He assured me his tears were that of joy. I could feel his emotion then and now. I gave him a hug and thanked him. I still have the picture we took. I have many incredible moments with Valiant fans but that one will always be in my heart. It was at that moment that I truly realized what it meant to be and "Stay Valiant".


As you can Ciera is already a real hero and doing great things with this role I recommend checking her out on social media and her website.  Also look for her at Cons as I expect her to be going to a few.

Learn more about Ciera Foster:

Please follow Ciera on her Twitter and Instagram 

           Available July 8 - July 15: Lido Della Nizioni, Emilia-Romagna, 1 BD / 1 BA / Sleeps: 6 ----- Thaiti G/42    

Lido Della Nizioni   Emilia-Romagna    Details    Small semi-detached house, about 800m from the beach and from the centre of Lido delle Nazioni. The vertically spreading accommodation has private entrance and garden. Barbecue, parking in a small squ...

          World: General Assembly Approves Appropriation of $6.8 Billion for 14 Peacekeeping Operations in 2017/18   
Source: UN General Assembly
Country: Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Western Sahara, World

GENERAL ASSEMBLY PLENARY
SEVENTY-FIRST, 89TH MEETING (AM)
GA/11927 30 JUNE 2017

Approving the appropriation of $6.80 billion for 14 peacekeeping operations for the 2017/18 fiscal period, the General Assembly today adopted 21 resolutions and one decision contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary). (See Press Release GA/AB/4239.)

Appropriating funds for peacekeeping operations from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, the Assembly adopted resolutions on missions in Abyei, Central African Republic, Côte d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Darfur, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Golan, Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, South Sudan and Western Sahara.

All texts were adopted without a vote, with the exception of the resolution setting out budgetary arrangements for the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), which it adopted by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States) with no abstentions.

The Assembly also adopted related drafts on the support account for peacekeeping operations, and financing for the account; on the triennial review of the rates and standards for reimbursement to Member States for contingent-owned equipment; and on the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, and Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda.

As well, it adopted a resolution on special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and abuse, by which it requested the Secretary-General to immediately inform Member States concerned of allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, and called upon Member States — including those deploying non-United Nations forces authorized by a Security Council mandate — to investigate such cases, hold perpetrators accountable and repatriate units where there was credible evidence of widespread or systemic sexual exploitation and abuse.

Also adopted was a text on the United Nations financial reports and audited financial statements on peacekeeping missions, as well as the Board of Auditors’ reports on them.

Finally, the Assembly adopted a draft decision by which it deferred, until the second part of its resumed seventy-second session, consideration of reports from the Secretary-General, and related reports from the Advisory Committee, regarding closed peacekeeping missions.

Action on Draft Resolutions

The Assembly took action on the draft resolutions contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), which were introduced by Committee Rapporteur Diana Lee (Singapore).

First, it adopted a resolution contained in the budget Committee’s report on financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors (document A/71/702/Add.1), accepting the financial report and audited financial statements of United Nations peacekeeping operations for the period ending 30 June 2016. It endorsed the recommendations in the corresponding reports of the Board and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), and asked the Secretary-General to ensure their full implementation. It went on to ask the Secretary-General to indicate an expected time frame for implementation, and to give, in his next report, a full explanation for delays in implementation of the Board’s outstanding recommendations, the root causes of recurring issues and measures to be taken.

It then turned to the report on administrative and budgetary aspects of financing peacekeeping operations (document A/71/708/Add.1), adopting five resolutions contained therein.

First, it adopted resolution I on the financing of the Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda, by which it approved the amount of $33 million for the maintenance of the Centre for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

Then it adopted resolution II on the financing of the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, by which the Assembly would approve the cost estimates for the Base in the amount of $81 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

Next, it adopted resolution III on the support account for peacekeeping operations. By its terms, the Assembly decided to approve the support account requirements of $325.80 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $25.04 million for the enterprise resource planning project, $821,500 for information and systems security and $868,500 for the global service delivery model. It also approved the requirement of 1,357 continuing and 3 new temporary posts, as well as the abolishment, redeployment, reassignment and reclassification of posts, as set out in annex I of the text; and 77 continuing and 3 new general temporary assistance positions and 59 person-months, as set out in annex II, as well as related post and non-post requirements.

The Assembly went on to adopt resolution IV on the triennial review of the rates and standards for reimbursement to Member States for contingent-owned equipment. By doing so, it took note of the report of the 2017 Working Group on Contingent-Owned Equipment and the report of the Secretary-General. It also endorsed the conclusions and recommendations contained in the report of the ACABQ.

Finally, it adopted resolution V on special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse. By its terms, the Assembly welcomed the Secretary-General’s determination to fully implement the United Nations policy of zero tolerance for sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as his determination to fully enforce the newly promulgated policy of whistle-blower protection. It requested that he immediately inform Member States concerned of allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, and called upon Member States — including those deploying non-United Nations forces authorized by a Security Council mandate — to investigate such cases, hold perpetrators accountable and repatriate units where there was credible evidence of widespread or systemic sexual exploitation and abuse.

Turning to reports on peacekeeping missions, the Assembly first adopted a text on financing of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) (document A/71/945), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNISFA the amount of $285.12 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $266.70 million for the maintenance of the Force, $13.49 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $3.38 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $1.56 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Turning to a report on financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) (document A/71/946), the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Mission $943.77 million from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $882.80 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $44.65 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $11.16 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $5.16 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted a text on financing of the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI) (document A/71/715/Add.1). By its terms, the Assembly, recalling Security Council resolution 2284 (2016) extending the mission mandate for a final period until 30 June 2017, decided that, for Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Operation, shall be credited with their respective share of $65.22 million, comprising the unencumbered balance of $48.68 million and $16.54 million of other revenue in respect of the financial period ending 30 June 2016.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) (document A/71/947). By its terms, it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNFICYP $57.41 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, inclusive of $54.00 million for the maintenance of the Force, $2.73 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $682,900 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Next, it adopted a report on financing of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) (document A/71/948), appropriating to the Special Account for MONUSCO $1.22 billion for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, inclusive of $1.14 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $57.74 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $14.44 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.67 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted a resolution contained in the Committee’s report on financing of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) (document A/71/933) by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for that Mission $5.69 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 31 December 2017, including $4.55 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.14 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Next, the Assembly adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) (document A/71/950), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNMIK $40.29 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $37.90 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $1.92 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $479,200 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) (document A/71/951). By its terms, it appropriated to the Special Account for UNMIL $116.95 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $110.00 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $5.56 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.91 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

The Assembly also adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) (document A/71/952), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for MINUSMA $1.12 billion for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $1.05 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $53.00 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $13.25 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.12 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Under its agenda item on financing of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East, the Assembly took action on resolutions contained in two reports.

It first adopted a draft on the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) (document A/71/953), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Force the amount of $61.30 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $57.65 million for the maintenance of UNDOF, $2.92 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $729,100 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

The representative of Syria said his delegation had joined consensus on the resolutions on United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East. However, it believed that it was Israel’s responsibility to pay for those Missions.

The Assembly then turned to a resolution contained in the report on the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) (document A/71/954).

By a recorded vote of 85 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States) with 53 abstentions, the Assembly adopted preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 13.

Taking action on the draft resolution as a whole, the Assembly adopted it by a recorded vote of 137 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States) with no abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNIFIL the amount of $513.53 million, for the period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, inclusive of $483.00 million for the maintenance of the Force, $24.43 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $6.11 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Also by the draft, the Assembly expressed deep concern that Israel had not complied with previous resolutions on UNIFIL, and requested that the Secretary-General take the measures necessary to ensure the full implementation of their relevant paragraphs.

The Assembly then adopted a resolution on financing of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) (document A/71/955), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNMISS $1.14 billion for the period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $1.07 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $54.16 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $13.54 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.26 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted the resolution in the report on financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) (document A/71/956), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for MINURSO $55.59 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $52.00 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $2.63 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $657,600 for the United Nations Logistics Base and $303,800 for the Regional Service Centre.

It then adopted a resolution on financing of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) (document A/71/957), by which it appropriated to the Special Account for UNAMID $33.56 million for the period of 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $24.58 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $6.15 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $2.84 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Taking up the report on financing of the activities arising from Security Council resolution 1863 (2009) (document A/71/958), the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the United Nations Support Office for the African Union Mission in Somalia (UNSOA) $622.19 million for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, including $582.00 million for the maintenance of the Office, $29.43 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $7.36 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $3.40 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Finally, acting on the Committee’s report on review of the efficiency of the administration and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/71/717/Add.2), the Assembly deferred until the second part of its resumed seventy-second session consideration of the reports of the Secretary-General and the ACABQ on closed peacekeeping missions.


          World: Global Weather Hazards Summary, June 30 - July 6, 2017   
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Togo, Uganda, World

Heavy rainfall continues over Central America

Africa Weather Hazards

  1. Below-average rainfall since mid-May has led to abnormal dryness across eastern Uganda and southwestern Kenya. Moisture deficits are likely to negatively impact cropping and Pastoral activities.

          BIG OIL BEHIND HAITI QUAKE?   
News Item...
          Miles de haitianos abandonados a su suerte deambulan hambrientos en calles de Tijuana    
La situación de los migrantes haitianos varados en Tijuana, Baja California, no ha cambiado. A un año de su llegada siguen padeciendo escasez de alimentos, falta de servicios de salud, de alojamiento, y han sido víctimas de abusos sexuales. Autoridades como el Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM) no han resuelto la situación y no les brindan el apoyo necesario, denunció Wilner Metelus, del Comité Ciudadano en Defensa de los Naturalizados y Afromexicanos.
          DJ JUMPOFF AFTER WORK JUMPOFF MIX 11-9   
itunes pic
Uncle Murda f. Future - Right Now Dae Dae - Spend It DJ Khaled feat. Jay Z and Future - I Got the Keys Dre Murro Feat Young Dolph - Know You Know Fly Ty feat.Offset [Migos] - Large Bag feat.Offset [Migos] Prod.Murrille 23:44 Jim Jones ft Rich Homie, ASAP Ferg, Desiigner - Finesse - Jim Jones ft Rich Homie, ASAP Ferg, Desiigner - Finesse Jim Jones ft Rich Homie, ASAP Ferg, Desiigner - Finesse - Jim Jones ft Rich Homie, ASAP Ferg, Desiigner - Finesse Kevin Gates ft August Alsina - I Dont Get Tired Lajan Slim - Haitians Lil Durk - Money Walk - Logic ft Pusha T - Wrist Mulla Murda feat. Kidd Kidd - Narco Phresher ft 50 Cent - Wait A Minute (Remix) PnB Rock Ft Fetty Wap - Run It Up Rick Ross - Blowing Money Fast Rowdy Rebel Feat Bobby Shmurda - Computers [Clean] 42:53 Chris Brown Ft Wizkid, Trey Songz & French Montana - Shabba Dre Murro - Know U Know (ft. Young Dolph) Eskeerdo - Weekend Behavior Mishon - Hella Good Love Shonte Renee ft T Pain - Rock With You Fetty Wap - Make You Feel Good Fetty Wap - Make You Feel Good B. Smyth ft Rick Ross - Gold Wrappers Ray J - Be With You Troy Ave - Troy Ave - Chuck Norris (Hoes & Gangstas) SNS - Bag Talk
          UNstoppable: How Advocates Persevered in the Fight for Justice for Haitian Cholera Victims   

Adam Houston

In 2016, December 1st—already an occasion to highlight the importance of health and human rights as World AIDS Day—took on new significance as a landmark in one of the highest-profile health and human rights cases of the 21st century. This was the day that UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon finally issued an apology on [...]

          Cienfueguero Moncada encabeza el juego de las Futuras Estrellas   

La furia de los aficionados de los Medias Blancas se ha convertido en la alegría de los de Miami. La inexplicable demora de Chicago por ascender al mejor prospecto de las Grandes Ligas permitirá que Yoan Moncada venga a La Pequeña Habana para el Juego de las Estrellas del Futuro. Foto: Lenny Ignelzi AP


Read more here: http://www.elnuevoherald.com/deportes/beisbol/article158898189.html#storylink=cpy

          Ballet Hispanico to Perform at Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival This July   

Ballet Hispánico will perform at Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival at the Ted Shawn Theater, 358 George Carter Road, Becket, MA 01223, from July 26-30, 2017.

Ballet Hispanico brings captivating style, crisp technique, and charismatic bravado to the Ted Shawn Theatre.

Ballet Hispanico offers the thrilling diversity of Latino culture-a fusion of classical, Latin, and contemporary dance. The program features the Pillow-commissioned and flamenco-inspired Línea Recta by Colombian-Belgian choreographer Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, set to Spanish guitar by Eric Vaarzon Morel. Other works include Eduardo Vilaro's Danzón, which features a contemporary take on the national dance of Cuba, and El Beso by award-winning Spanish choreographer Gustavo Ramírez Sansano.

Performances play Wednesday-Saturday at 8pm; Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2pm. Tickets are $45-78 and are available at www.jacobspillow.org/events/ballet-hispanico.


PROGRAM:

Línea Recta (2016)
Choreography by Annabelle Lopez Ochoa

From one of today's most sought-after choreographers comes a powerful and resonant work that explores an intriguing aspect of flamenco dance: the conspicuous absence of physical partnering. While maintaining the integrity and hallmark passion of the genre, Annabelle Lopez Ochoa imagines an original and explosive movement language premised upon the theme of partnership and performed to live flamenco guitar by Eric Vaarzon Morel. Línea Recta came to fruition through Ballet Hispánico's Instituto Coreográfico, an innovative choreography lab program for Latino dance makers. Línea Rectais Annabelle Lopez Ochoa's third original work for Ballet Hispánico under Eduardo Vilaro; the Company previously commissioned and performed audience favorites Mad'moiselle (2010) and Sombrerísimo (2013). BalletHispánico also acquired and performed Lopez Ochoa's Before After (2002), Nube Blanco (2008) and Locked Up Laura (2009).

Danzón (2012)
Choreography by Eduardo Vilaro

Danzón has been called the official dance of Cuba. Having evolved from the Haitian contradance, its history is steeped in the fusion of cultures. But danzón is also used throughout Latin America as a term of celebration, a coming together of community and a way of maintaining identity. Fusing Afro-Cuban social dance movements with contemporary and classical dance forms, Eduardo Vilaro has taken this traditional and quintessentially Cuban dance form and reinvented it as a joyous celebration of music and movement. Mr. Vilaro is the Artistic Director and Chief Executive Officer of Ballet Hispánico.

El Beso (2014)
Choreography by Gustavo Ramírez Sansano

Award-winning Spanish choreographer Gustavo Ramírez Sansano (a Dance Magazine "25 to Watch" pick) premiered his first commission for BalletHispanico in 2014. , a tongue-in-cheek look at the iconic nature of a kiss with original costumes by Venezuelan fashion designer Angel Sanchez.


ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

ANNABELLE LOPEZ OCHOA (Choreographer) is a sought-after Belgo-Colombian choreographer that since 2003 has created works for more than 40 companies around the world such as Scapino Ballet, Dutch National Ballet, Djazzex, GenEva Ballet, Royal Ballet of Flanders, Gothenburg Ballet, Pennsylvania Ballet, BalletX, BJM-Danse Montreal, Luna Negra Dance Theater, Ballet National de Marseille, Saarbrucken Ballet, Jacoby & Pronk, Chemnitzer Ballet, Ballet Hispánico, Morphoses Wheeldon Company, Whim W'Him, IncolBallet de Colombia, Finnish National Ballet, Compania Nacional de Danza Madrid, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Scottish Ballet, The Washington Ballet, Ballet Nacional Dominicano, Ballet Saarbrucken, Augsburg Ballet, Ballet Austin, Atlanta Ballet, Grand Rapids Ballet, Ballet Moscow, BalletNacional de Cuba, West Australian Ballet, Danza Contemporanea de Cuba, Ballet Nacional Chileno, Ballet Staatstheater am Gartnerplatz Munchen, BalletManila, Daniil Simkin Intensio Project, Cincinnati Ballet, Silicon Valley Ballet, Joffrey Ballet, English National Ballet and New York City Ballet. In the fall of 2007 she was selected to participate with the prestigious New York Choreographic Institute. Dance Magazine named her work Cylindrical Shadows, performed by Pacific Northwest Ballet, as one of the highlights of 2012. Her full-length narrative ballet A Streetcar Named Desire has been awarded with 'Best Classical Choreography' by the Circle of Critics of the National Dance Award UK, the South Bank Sky Arts Awards for "Best New Production" and has been nominated for an Olivier Award 2012.

GUSTAVO RAMIREZ SANSANO (Choreographer) was Artistic Director of Luna Negra Dance Theater from 2009-2013, after directing proyectoTITOYAYA in Valencia, Spain for four years. Sansano has been the recipient of numerous awards for his choreography, including first prizes at the Ricard Moragas competition in Barcelona, the Dom Perignon choreographic competition in Hamburg, and at Las Artes Escénicas de la Comunidad Valenciana. He has been commissioned to create works for Compania Nacional de Danza, the Hamburg Ballet, TanzTheaterMünchen, Budapest Dance Theater, National Dance Company Wales, Norrdans, Gyori Ballet, Balletto dell'Esperia, BalletMet, IT dansa, Ballet Junior de Genève, and Nederlands Dans Theater, among others. As a dancer, Sansano performed works by Jacopo Godani, Hans Van Manen, Ji?í Kylián, Ohad Naharin, Johan Inger, Paul Lightfoot, Victor Ullate and many more, working for the BalletJoven de Alicante, Ballet Contemporaneo de Barcelona, Ballet de la Comunidad de Madrid, Nederlands Dans Theater II and Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. Gustavo was chosen by the magazine POR LA DANZA for its 15th anniversary as one of the 'Fifteen Choreographers to Watch.' Dance Magazine featured Luna Negra's artistic director, Gustavo Ramírez Sansano, in its annual '25 to Watch' list 2012, and was named 'Chicagoan of the Year in Arts & Entertainment' by the Chicago Tribune.

Eduardo Vilaro (Choreographer) joined Ballet Hispánico as Artistic Director in August 2009, becoming only the second person to head the company since it was founded in 1970. In 2015, Mr. Vilaro took on the additional role of Chief Executive Officer of Ballet Hispánico. He has been part of the Ballet Hispánico family since 1985 as a principal dancer and educator, after which he began a ten-year record of achievement as Founder and Artistic Director of Luna Negra Dance Theater in Chicago. Mr. Vilaro has infused Ballet Hispánico's legacy with a bold and eclectic brand of contemporary dance that reflects America's changing cultural landscape. Born in Cuba and raised in New York from the age of six, he is a frequent speaker on the merits of cultural diversity and dance education.

Mr. Vilaro's own choreography is devoted to capturing the spiritual, sensual and historical essence of the Latino cultures. He created over 20 ballets for Luna Negra and has received commissions from the Ravinia Festival, the Chicago Sinfonietta, the Grant Park Festival, the Lexington Ballet and the Chicago Symphony. In 2001, he was a recipient of a Ruth Page Award for choreography, and in 2003, he was honored for his choreographic work at Panama's II International Festival of Ballet. In 2016, he was inducted into the Bronx Walk of Fame.


Jacob's Pillow, celebrating its 85th Festival in 2017, is a National Historic Landmark, recipient of the National Medal of Arts, and home to America's longest-running international dance festival. Each Festival includes more than 50 national and international dance companies and 350 free and ticketed performances, talks, tours, classes, exhibits, and events. The School at Jacob's Pillow, one of the most prestigious professional dance training centers in the U.S., encompasses the diverse disciplines of Ballet, Cultural Traditions, Contemporary, and Musical Theatre Dance, as well as an Intern Program in various disciplines of arts administration, design, video, and production. The Pillow's extensive Archives, open year-round to the public, chronicle more than a century of dance in photographs, programs, books, costumes, audiotapes, and videos. Notable artists who have created or premiered dances at the Pillow include choreographers Antony Tudor, Agnes De Mille, Alvin Ailey, Donald McKayle, Kevin Mckenzie, Twyla Tharp, Ralph Lemon, Susan Marshall, Trisha Brown, Ronald K. Brown, Wally Cardona, Andrea Miller, and Trey McIntyre; performed by artists such as Mikhail Baryshnikov, Carmen De Lavallade, Mark Morris, Dame Margot Fonteyn, Edward Villella, Rasta Thomas, and hundreds of others. On March 2, 2011, President Barack Obama honored Jacob's Pillow with a National Medal of Arts, the highest arts award given by the United States Government, making the Pillow the first dance presenting organization to receive this prestigious award. For more information, visit www.jacobspillow.org.


          HAITI Kettenanhänger aus massiv 585 Gelbgold mit Halskette   
339,90 EUR
Halskette Panzer 1,2 mm - 50 cm lang - mit Kettenanh?nger aus der Form der Haiti Landkarte aus massiv 585 Gelbgold!Der Anh?nger ist mit einer gro?en ?se versehen, sodass dieser auch mit einer etwas dickeren Halskette getragen werden kann.Die Anh?nger werden in einer traditionsreichen deutschen Goldschmiede aus massivem Material hergestellt und selbstverst?ndlich 585 gestempelt!Landkarte: HaitiMaterial: massiv 585 GelbgoldGr??e: ca. 23 mm und 1mm dickGewicht: ca. 4,3 gOberfl?che: Vorderseite handpoliert und R?ckseite matt geb?rstetHalskette: 50 cm lang, Panzer 1,2 mm mit Federring-VerschlussSonderanfertigungen, wie z.B. ein anderes Land, gr??er oder aus einem anderen Material k?nnen auf Wunsch f?r Sie hergestellt werden. Fragen Sie uns einfach danach! Wir werden Ihnen sicherlich weiter helfen k?nnen!Alle Kettenanh?nger werden direkt nach Ihrer Bestellung von einer traditionsreichen deutschen Goldschmiede extra f?r Sie angefertigt.Die Abbildungen sind nicht in Originalgr??e - Bitte entnehmen Sie die Gr??e der jeweiligen Produktbeschreibung!

          Watch Episode #5 of THIS WEEK IN CARIBBEAN TECH LIVE Broadcast   
Watch Episode#5 of This Week in Caribbean Tech Live Broadcast, hosted weekly, every Thursday by Ingrid Riley on Facebook. In this Episode: Haiti Tech Summit, Ben Horowitz; Artificial Intelligence and BPO Jobs in Jamaica; The cost of Internet Service in the Caribbean; Ganjagram Startup; four Caribbean Tech events coming and a funny social media trend...
          L'effet Haïku, Lire et écrire des poèmes courts agrandit notre vie, Lire et écrire des poèmes courts agrandit notre vie Par l'auteur PASCALE SENK   
lumière sur la place en haut des arbres tous les reflets des feuilles
Pascale Senk

Véritable voie de méditation et d'épanouissement, les haïkus, poèmes courts d'inspiration japonaise, invitent à développer son attention au monde et à la nature, à exprimer sa vie intérieure et ses émotions, et à saisir les instants précieux de la vie…

Dans ce livre, découvrez les plus beaux haïkus des maîtres japonais et des haïkistes contemporains, puis apprenez les secrets pour créer et écrire vos propres poèmes courts. Que vous soyez novice ou expert, que vous souhaitiez écrire dans la solitude ou en groupe, dans un cadre personnel, scolaire ou professionnel, partez pour cette promenade dans le monde des haïkus. Vous sentirez la magie opérer, car lire et composer des haïkus intensifie le sentiment d'exister.

«Voici donc la force de cet ouvrage: nous donner envie de vivre encore plus intensément, plus légèrement, plus pleinement. Et, aussi, de composer ses propres haïkus…»

Dominique Loreau, auteur de L'art de la simplicité

Téléchargez le supplément de «L'effet Haïku».

ISBN : 9782890448957
Prix : 20,99 $
Date de parution : Mai 2017
          L'effet Haïku, Lire et écrire des poèmes courts agrandit notre vie, Lire et écrire des poèmes courts agrandit notre vie Par l'auteur Pascale Senk   
lumière sur la place en haut des arbres tous les reflets des feuilles
Pascale Senk

Véritable voie de méditation et d'épanouissement, les haïkus, poèmes courts d'inspiration japonaise, invitent à développer son attention au monde et à la nature, à exprimer sa vie intérieure et ses émotions, et à saisir les instants précieux de la vie…

Dans ce livre, découvrez les plus beaux haïkus des maîtres japonais et des haïkistes contemporains, puis apprenez les secrets pour créer et écrire vos propres poèmes courts. Que vous soyez novice ou expert, que vous souhaitiez écrire dans la solitude ou en groupe, dans un cadre personnel, scolaire ou professionnel, partez pour cette promenade dans le monde des haïkus. Vous sentirez la magie opérer, car lire et composer des haïkus intensifie le sentiment d'exister.

«Voici donc la force de cet ouvrage: nous donner envie de vivre encore plus intensément, plus légèrement, plus pleinement. Et, aussi, de composer ses propres haïkus…»

Dominique Loreau, auteur de L'art de la simplicité

Téléchargez le supplément de «L'effet Haïku».
Extrait pdf du livre (pdf)

ISBN : 9782890448940
Prix : 27,95 $
Date de parution : Mars 2017
          A Pan-African agenda for the 21st century   
Sub-Title: 
Notes on the opening session of the 2nd Kwame Nkrumah Cultural and Intellectual Festival

On Monday 26 June 2017, a most important event for the future of the Global African family took place on African soil at the University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.  It was a gathering of Africans and pan-Africanists, academics, activists, political leaders, students and youth from all over the world at the opening ceremony of the 2nd Kwame Nkrumah Pan-African Intellectual and Cultural Festival. 

In a day characterised by seriousness of purpose, commonality of ideas and sense of mission, the foundation of the meeting was set by Kwame Nkrumah Chair of African Studies Professor Horace Campbell who, in welcoming the participants, provided what can only be described as a masterful “update” of the state of the black condition globally. Prof Campbell achieved the simultaneous goal of updating participants on the specific struggles in specific regions but also demonstrated to all and sundry how their struggles are interlinked.

In what was described, by Joseph Engwenyu, a historian from Uganda, as the most powerful opening ceremony to any global conference that he has ever attended, nowhere was left untouched and analysed in Campbell’s welcome: from the struggles against neo-liberalism in Latin America and the deliberate overthrow of the ordered states of Libya, Iraq and Syria and North Africa and the Middle East, significantly worsening the lives of black citizens in these countries, but more importantly, reversing the possibilities of the economic and material advancement of the pan-African project which was being led by Libya.

In his roll call, Campbell noted the physical absence of Haiti, but was moved to invoke their presence in spirit, since he affirmed that it is impossible to hold a gathering of this nature without acknowledging Haiti, for its sacrifices in igniting the flame of African liberation globally.

Significantly, too, Campbell highlighted the fact of the re-articulation of renewed imperialist aggression by the United States against people of colour, both within and outside its borders. Arising out of this assessment, Campbell emphasised that the ultimate aim of the conference was to establish modes of deepening African unity and to identify concrete practical steps for charting the way forward as an agenda for pan-Africanism in the twenty-first century.

This theme of the need for unity was sustained and reinforced by strong solidarity messages, the most symbolic being delivered by Samia Nkrumah, the daughter of Ghana’s founding president and eminent pan-Africanist Kwame Nkrumah, who insisted on the need to re-affirm Nkrumah’s message of continental unity: one economy, one currency, one army, one foreign policy and one government.  Given the convening of a conference called under the name of Kwame Nkrumah, it was a significant wake-up call, which placed the ultimate vision of Nkrumah squarely at the centre of the consciousness of the participants.

The opening ceremony was presided over by the Vice Chancellor of the University of Ghana Professor Ebenezer Owusu. After the welcome statement by the Director of the Institute of African Studies Professor Dzodzi Tsikata, there were solidarity messages from Barbados, the former Prime Minister of Namibia, Nahas Nangula, representative of the Polisario liberation forces of Western Sahara, Mr M. M. Buyema and Samia Nkrumah, the daughter of Kwame Nkrumah. The President of Ghana was represented by Professor Kwesi Yankah, Deputy Minister of Education.

The highlight of the gathering of this opening ceremony of more than 400 persons in the Great Hall of the University of Ghana was the feature address, delivered by the Vice Chancellor of the University of the West Indies, Sir Hilary Beckles, whose contribution set the analytical and a programmatic guideline for the way forward for pan-Africanism to the mid-twenty-first century.

On reflecting upon the African condition in the context of the Western world’s claim to fighting a war on terror, Prof Beckles noted that no part of the world has had a more brutal experience of terrorism than the Caribbean under European slavery. Having established this fact, Beckles therefore set the stage for reflecting on a future pan-African project.

His proposed program was framed within a recounting of the stance taken by the major African states at the UN Durban World Conference Against Racism in which, according to his recounting, the formal leaders of Africa abandoned the Caribbean delegations in their call for reparations.  The powerful symbol left by Beckles was that of a mother (Africa) abandoning her scattered children (the Caribbean). He insisted that something had been broken and needed to be repaired. 

Beckles framed his argument on the basis that the Caribbean had “done its part” for Africa, from its intellectual, moral and organisational contribution to the struggles against colonialism and independence through the work of pan-Africanists like George Padmore, to the struggle against apartheid as seen in the work of reggae artistes like Bob Marley, to the military contribution of Cuba in Southern Africa. According to Beckles’s narrative, the children had never walked away from the mother, and that Africa, by turning her back on her children in their hour of need, had inflicted a deep wound in the relationship that needed to be healed.  Beckles therefore suggested that before any further forward movement could occur, the African mother would have to reach out to her children in global Africa, as part of the process of healing.

Symbolism aside, this call for the African mother to reach out to her children set the scene for the offering of practical and programmatic agenda which would emerge in the conference. This not only included the role of Africa in supporting the call to spearhead a reparations movement, but it forced upon the conference the need to think about the kind of agenda around which a program of reaching out between Africa and the Caribbean could be built.  This represents the first framework for a future pan-African agenda.

The second inference by Beckles, which created a framework for a future program of action for pan-Africanism, was his own recognition of a split between African states and African civil society, which was symbolised in Durban with the support for reparations from African civil society but a rejection of the call for reparations by the states. This recognition of the split over reparations was seen as symptomatic of a deeper crisis of the post-colonial independent state, in which elites have been cut off from the aspirations of the people.

This set the tone for a second major agenda issue of the conference: the need to re-examine the failures of an elite-led independence project and, relatedly, the failures of an elite-led pan-African project. Indeed, this has, at the time of writing, constituted a major aspect of the theoretical and practical aspects of the conference, with many of the papers focussing on re-examining the ideas of Walter Rodney, CLR James, George Padmore, WEB Dubois, Amilcar Cabral, Frantz Fanon, Kwame Nkrumah and others.

In addition, the question of overcoming many of the specific aspects of the failure and reversal of the independence and Pan-Africanism have been placed on the agenda. Thus, issues of education, land reform, an African currency, economic sovereignty, integration, indeed, a re-examining of every major aspect of the ongoing failures of post-colonial experience, was inspired by the recognition of the split between civil society and states.

Finally, above all else, the conference theme was “Global Africa 2063: Education for Reconstruction and Transformation”. The conference, and opening ceremony, created an excellent platform for future links between education institutions between Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and North America, and the rethinking of the substance of education into a future pan-African project, towards meeting the African Union’s goal of a unified Africa by the year 2063.

Given the energy of the conference, the crisis of global capitalism, the sense of mission, and the feeling of the urgency of moment, Professor Campbell was moved to warn that African unity will come before 2063.  We await the formal release of the Accra Declaration of Action, as a way forward towards pan-Africanism into the twenty-first Century.

* TENNYSON S.D. JOSEPH teaches in the Department of Government, Sociology & Social Work at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill. He is a prolific writer who pens a weekly column in the Nation. He is the author of Decolonization in St. Lucia: Politics and Global Neoliberalism, 1945–2010, University Press of Mississippi, 2011.

* THE VIEWS OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHOR AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE PAMBAZUKA NEWS EDITORIAL TEAM

* BROUGHT TO YOU BY PAMBAZUKA NEWS

* Please do not take Pambazuka for granted! Become a Friend of Pambazuka and make a donation NOW to help keep Pambazuka FREE and INDEPENDENT!

* Please send comments to [email=editor@pambazuka.org]editor[at]pambazuka[dot]org[/email] or comment online at Pambazuka News.

Issue Number: 
Article Image Caption | Source: 
File

          CARICOM deals a blow to US plans for regime change in Venezuela    

Venezuela’s Foreign Minister, Delcy Rodriguez, recently tweeted that the “US State Department deployed its ambassadors in the region to attack Venezuela. We come with renewed vigor to defeat them at the OAS.”

So said, so done. The US Ambassador to Guyana, Perry Holloway, spewed the US false narrative regarding Venezuela in our local newspapers. US ambassadors in a number of other Caribbean countries did the same. It was a coordinated attempt to mislead the people of Guyana and the region about what is really happening in Venezuela, and to apply pressure on members of CARICOM (Caribbean Community) and the OAS (Organization of American States) to succumb to US calls for intervention, with the aim of overthrowing the democratically elected government of President Nicolas Maduro.

US diplomats in Guyana, and for that matter throughout the Global South, are not diplomats in the strict sense of the word, and can be better described as political activists. They are constantly meddling in the internal affairs of the country they are stationed in, giving directives to the compliant neo-colonial regimes and actively undermining and destabilizing independent and anti-imperialist governments, such as the government in Venezuela.

This latest US psych-ops came just after the May 31st meeting of the OAS in Washington DC and just prior to the June 19th OAS meeting in Cancun, Mexico, where CARICOM member states took a firm and united anti-interventionist position in relation to the current situation in Venezuela, delivering a resounding defeat to the interventionist approach advocated by the US, Mexico, Peru and Panama,

Following the June 19th OAS meeting, Venezuela’s Foreign Minister, Delcy Rodriguez, said: “Today we come with the strength of our people who took to the streets to denounce the interventionism of the Organization of American States, we come with the force of the rain of our commander Hugo Chavez. Independence and sovereignty triumphed today over the United States of America, with its brutal pressure, with its gross extortion, with its maneuvers…”

She added that the call for intervention encourages the “most violent, anti-democratic factions in our country,” and she thanked the Caribbean nations for their “deeply principled stand.”
In his letter and articles, US ambassador, Perry Holloway, had the temerity to lecture Guyana and other member-states of the OAS about their obligation to democracy and human rights. He stated that: “The diverse family of nations in the Americas recognizes democracy is a part of our collective DNA. Sixteen years ago in Peru, we underscored this principle with the adoption of the Inter-American Democratic Charter, affirming the right of the peoples of the Americas to democracy and obligating our governments to defend that right.”

I suggest that before US diplomats in the Caribbean and the Americas offer any criticism or advice to Venezuela or any member-state of the OAS on issues of democracy and human rights, they should first examine the behavior of their own government in relation to their undemocratic practices and policies, both internally and around the world, and their endless list of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Trump lays bare sham democracy

The only positive aspect of Trump’s presidency is that it is exposing, once and for all, the sham that parades as US democracy and concern for human rights. The entirely undemocratic nature of US internal and foreign policy is clear to all in 2017. Even that minority of citizens on this planet who still held out some hope that the US resembled anything close to a democracy, have now seen through the façade. American political philosopher, Sheldon S. Wolin, in his brilliant work, Democracy Incorporated: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism, renders a devastating critique of US democracy and is a vital read for anyone who wishes to understand the latent fascism that underpins the politics of this Empire.

Former US Attorney-General, Ramsay Clark, had this to say: “We’re not a democracy. It’s a terrible misunderstanding and a slander to the idea of democracy to call us that. In reality, we’re a plutocracy, a government by the wealthy.” He compared President George W. Bush to Adolf Hitler, and is on record as saying at the outset of the US invasion of Iraq, that it “will be genocide again,” adding that “the greatest crime since World War Two has been US foreign policy.”

As I watch the hue and cry over Trump’s actions, it reminds me of Adolph Hitler’s response to Europe’s criticism of his policies. He told them: “I am only doing out in the open what you have been doing behind closed doors for centuries.”

A meme that was circulated at the end of Obama’s presidency said it best: “Only in shallow, self-absorbed, privileged America could a leader drop 26,000 bombs on seven countries in a single year, and have citizens mourn the end of his term because he looked and sounded classy while doing it.”

The illusion highlighted in this meme picks up on the public relations stunt that has become a hallmark of the US establishment, and which Sheldon Wolin identifies as a major feature of the “inverted totalitarianism” that exists in the US today. He describes “inverted totalitarianism” as a state of affairs where a small ruling elite (the 1%) have established an authoritarian society which benefits them exclusively. In this society, corporations have corrupted and subverted democracy, and natural resources and labor are seen as mere commodities to be exploited for huge profits.

This status quo is maintained by a sophisticated propaganda machine that lulls the majority of people into apathy. Central to reinforcing this hegemon is a tightly controlled corporatized media, a mouthpiece for the establishment, that is constantly spinning fake news and false narratives, and emphasizing rabid consumerism, individualism and the politics of personality and sensationalism. Wolin, like Clark, compares modern day USA to Nazi Germany, pointing out that the form is different but the essence, that is, fascism, is the same.

Friendly fascism

Tirty-seven years ago, political scientist, Bertram Gross, coined the term “friendly fascism” and predicted the Orwellian reality we are witnessing today in the US. His thesis converges with the conclusions reached by Wolin, Clark and others.

In his farewell address at the end of his presidency in 1961, Republican Dwight Eisenhower, warned the American people about the dangers of the “Military Industrial Complex”, the control it exerted and its ability to, in his words, “weaken or destroy the very institutions and principles it was designed to protect.” This has surely come to pass.

So, before US diplomats such as Perry Holloway attempt to discredit the Bolivarian Revolution in Venezuela, initiated by one of the most revered freedom fighters in the Americas, the late Hugo Chavez, and led today by President Nicolas Maduro and the United Socialist Party of Venezuela with the support of the majority of the people of Venezuela, they would do well to take a long and hard look at the crisis of democracy in their own country.

Let Mr. Holloway explain to Guyanese and the citizenry of all member-states of the OAS why, in 2017, Africans in the US continue to be gunned down in the streets on a regular basis.
Let him explain to us why the US has the largest number of persons imprisoned per capita in the world, and why the prisoners are disproportionately made up of Africans, Indigenous and other people of color, before he points the finger at a revolution that has lifted African and Indigenous Venezuelans out of debilitating discrimination and poverty.

Let Mr. Holloway address the situation of US political prisoners like Mumia Abu-Jamal, Jamil Al-Amin (formerly Rap Brown), Leonard Peltier and so many others who are languishing in US prisons before he speaks of Venezuela’s human rights record.

Let the US Ambassador focus on the shocking poverty and illiteracy statistics emerging from his own country, before he points the finger at the Bolivarian revolution which has made unprecedented gains in eradicating poverty and illiteracy amongst the masses of Venezuela’s poor. Anyone who visited oil rich Venezuela prior to the Bolivarian revolution can testify to the abhorrent conditions and the repressive measures used to subjugate the majority of Venezuelans, and in particular, African and Indigenous Venezuelans.

Does the Ambassador truly believe that his letters and articles, full of the usual delusional and empty rhetoric, would convince any of us that his government is concerned about democracy and human rights in Venezuela, or anywhere in the world for that matter, after we have witnessed the apocalyptic events in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Syria and the list goes on?

Does Mr. Holloway think we have forgotten our own history in the Americas and the Caribbean, including the US orchestrated coups that overthrew the democratically elected governments of President Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, President Salvador Allende in Chile, Prime Minister Maurice Bishop in Grenada, President Manuel Zelaya in Honduras and the constitutional coup against President Dilma Rousseff in Brazil? What about the removal at gunpoint of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide by US military personnel in Haiti?

There is not the space in a single article to even list the US crimes in our region. Just to chronicle them warrants a book. If we were to list US crimes against the whole of humanity, we are looking at a library of books. The US Empire and the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Empires that preceded it, have been without doubt the worst examples of terrorism in all of human history.

In his letter and article, Mr. Holloway advises that “when a government breaks with democracy, we must act in solidarity with its people, not through intervention or interference, but with diplomacy and mediation among all parties to help find a peaceful, democratic, and comprehensive solution.” Tell us Mr. Holloway: Are the examples listed above your idea of diplomacy and mediation?

These governments were not removed because of their lack of democracy or abuse of human rights. They were removed, like countless others throughout the Global South, because they were attempting to free their country from the clutches of the Empire, and liberate their wealth and resources so that they might benefit the masses of their people. Our own founding fathers in Guyana, Cheddi Jagan and Forbes Burnham, were subjected to the same destabilization tactics at the hands of the US government and its CIA.

Empire loses its grip

The US and its diplomats need to understand that with the advent of the internet and the availability of information in this day and age, the Empire has lost all credibility. There is no one left on earth who can be misled by their hollow and hypocritical rhetoric. Do not be fooled by those who dare not speak openly -- they are afraid of losing their visas and even worse reprisals. Regardless of their cowardice and silence, everyone knows that the Emperor is naked. Behind closed doors, even those satraps who publicly profess their allegiance, such as the Saudis, snigger and jeer at the hideous state of affairs in the United States of America.

As the US Empire crumbles, its vampires, who have sucked the blood of the sufferers for so long, are in panic mode because, despite their descent into blatant authoritarianism and fascism, they continue to lose their grip on the terrifying world they have created, as it spins more and more out of control. The ugly death squads such as Al Qaeda and ISIS, the very Frankensteins of their own making, are turning right back on them. As Malcom X observed so long ago, the chickens must come home to roost. One cannot keep up with the number of attacks in the US and Europe.

One of the vampires, largely credited with creating Al Qaeda, a former US National Security Advisor, and founder of the Rockefeller-controlled Trilateral Commission, Zbigniew Brzezinski, in a speech to British elites at Chatham House in 2008, spoke volumes when he said:

“…new and old major powers face still yet another novel reality, in some respects unprecedented, and it is that while the lethality of their power is greater than ever, their capacity to impose control over the politically awakened masses of the world is at an historical low…I once put it rather pungently, and I was flattered that the British Foreign Secretary repeated this… namely, in earlier times, it was easier to control a million people than physically to kill a million people. Today, it is infinitely easier to kill a million people than to control a million people.”

The majority of CARICOM countries are governed by neo-colonial political outfits and even they voted against US plans for regime change in Venezuela.”
The current US administration, like its predecessors, whether Democrat or Republican, is involved in just that, killing millions of people all over the world in its bid to control, and trying desperately to convince us of the absurd notion that that they are doing this in the name of democracy and human rights. Trouble is, no one is buying it? The majority of CARICOM countries are governed by neo-colonial political outfits and even they voted against US plans for regime change in Venezuela. The playbook is old and tired. Donald Trump just tied up an arms deal worth 350 billion US dollars with the corrupt and entirely undemocratic regime of Saudi Arabia, a regime that is without doubt the main proliferator of the ideology of Wahhabism and the movements intent on imposing this ideology worldwide, such as Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Nusra Front and ISIS. All these weapons to a government that is funding terrorism worldwide and committing genocide in Yemen.

And, when the power struggle between the Saudis and the Qataris surfaced, Trump paid lip service to the manufactured war on terror by publicly condemning Qatar’s support for terrorism, and days later sold the Qataris US military hardware worth 12 billion dollars. In light of this hypocrisy and blatant disregard for the victims of these rogue states and their global terrorist network, can you really expect us to believe that your concern with Venezuela is about lack of democracy and human rights?

No shame
Finally, to Mr. Holloway and his cohorts throughout the region, your expressed shock and horror about the so-called spillover from Venezuela’s current predicament was perhaps the most shameful part of your missive: “The spillover effects from Venezuela’s crisis are serious and growing, whether it is irregular migrant flows to countries in our region or the increasing flow of arms and criminal activity that affect the Caribbean in particular.”

This is rich coming from the people who illegally invaded Libya, murdered the Libyan leader and freedom fighter, Muammar Qaddafi in the street, and in so doing, destroyed the most prosperous and democratic nation on the African continent, causing a migration crisis of a magnitude never seen before. Your government handed over the nation of Libya to a conglomerate of thugs, criminals, terrorists and reactionary warlords, and this spillover continues to wreak havoc throughout Africa and the Arab Region six years on. Before you concern yourself with any spillover in the Caribbean, please deal with the spillover from your criminal invasion of Libya, a spillover that only this month reached Manchester, England.

In Guyana, the Americas and throughout the Global South, the masses of people are sick and tired of the same old playbook -- the one that is in fact the cause of the current situation in Venezuela. But then, that is part of the devil’s own script, cause the problem and then come to us as savior, with a solution. It plays like this: the US, through its infamous web of security agencies, NGOs, Aid Agencies, think-tanks and other Trojan horses, destabilize, sow confusion and do everything in their power to overthrow any government and subjugate any people that refuse to obey Empire. Recently, more than 300,000 Venezuelans took to the streets in support of President Nicolas Maduro and the Bolivarian Revolution.

The opposition held a demonstration that attracted 50,000. Of course, in your United States, the corporate media is reporting just the opposite. By the admission of your own president they are the purveyors of fake news and this is just another example of your country’s lack of democracy. The bottom line is this Mr. Holloway: your country and its government is no way fit to point the finger at anyone when it comes to infringement of democracy, democratic values and human rights.

In your letters and articles you ask: “If these things were happening in our own countries, would we not want the rest of our American family of nations to speak out, and reach out, to help restore fundamental democratic freedoms and respect for constitutional institutions?”

In your own words you proclaim that: “The Organization of American States has for decades provided a forum to discuss our greatest challenges and take action together to address them. The challenge before us today is the death spiral of democracy in Venezuela.”

What you say in the two quotes above is correct except for one thing, the challenge before us today is not the death spiral of democracy in Venezuela, it is the death spiral of democracy in the United States and an evil Empire spinning out of control.

You are right -- the OAS should take immediate action to prevent further terrorism and turmoil because the spillover worldwide from the crisis in the United States is serious and growing.

* GERALD A. PERREIRA is chairperson of the Guyanese organizations Black Consciousness Movement Guyana (BCMG) and Organization for the Victory of the People (OVP) and an executive member of the Caribbean Chapter of the Network in Defense of Humanity. He lived in Libya for many years, served in the Green March, an international battalion for the defense of the Al Fatah Revolution, and was an executive member of the World Mathaba based in Libya. This article previously appeared in Black Agenda Report.

* THE VIEWS OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHOR AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE PAMBAZUKA NEWS EDITORIAL TEAM

* BROUGHT TO YOU BY PAMBAZUKA NEWS

* Please do not take Pambazuka for granted! Become a Friend of Pambazuka and make a donation NOW to help keep Pambazuka FREE and INDEPENDENT!

* Please send comments to [email=editor@pambazuka.org]editor[at]pambazuka[dot]org[/email] or comment online at Pambazuka News.

Issue Number: 
Article Image Caption | Source: 
AVN

          Canadian PM Trudeau is not a friend of all God’s children   

Trudeau’s first cabinet was Africanless. Africans in Canada, from the continent and here questioned this move.  Many felt that the younger Trudeau took us for granted because his father Pierre Elliott Trudeau (October 18, 1919 – September 28, 2000) “opened” the doors for immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa. Eventually he did appoint Somali Toronto MP Ahmed Hussen to the federal cabinet as immigration minister.

Trudeau did appoint Indian-born Sikh Harjit Sajjan, MP for Vancouver South, minister of defence. Sikhs have a significantly different history in Canada than Africans.  The Sikh community is represented in all professional fields: medical, legal, technological, academic. Africans came kicking and screaming to the Western Hemisphere. Recently he has been questioned about “fibbing” about being the leader of a battle in Afghanistan. Sajjan said yearly defence spending will swell by more than 70 per cent, from $18.9 billion in 2016-17 to $32.7 billion in 2026-27. He promised $62.3 billion in new spending over 20 years.

Bardish Chagger is another India- born Canadian politician who is the current Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism.  Chagger was elected as a Liberal member of the House of Commons of Canada in 2015.  She is the first female Leader of the Government in the House of Commons by Trudeau.

Amarjeet Sohi is an Indian-Canadian politician, currently the Member of Parliament for Edmonton and the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities in the federal cabinet. He narrowly beat out strong community advocate Nigerian-born Chinwe Okelu.

Maryam Monsef is an Afghan Canadian politician, a Liberal member the House of Commons in 2015. She was previously the Minister of Democratic Institutions and president of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada until January 10, 2017.

Monsef has not had an easy ride. According to Wikipedia: “Monsef has been criticized for stating that she was born in Afghanistan, when in fact she was born in Iran. When this was revealed in September 2016, some commentators pointed out that this could lead to revocation of her Canadian citizenship and potential deportation, while others have criticized the absurdity of the present law or decried the importation of birtherism into Canadian politics. In an interview at that time, former MP Dean Del Mastro said that political workers in the 2014 municipal and 2015 federal campaigns knew she was not born in Afghanistan, but chose not to make an issue of it.”

Navdeep Singh Bains, the new minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is a Canadian born Indian.

Canada’s role in Haiti should never be forgotten. Back in the day I discussed Haiti on the Black Commentator in an article: “Canada's Crimes Against Haiti” in   the October 27, 2005 issue. After reading Yves Engler and Anthony Fenton’s  volumeCanada in Haiti’, I pointed out: “The chapter ‘Responsibility to Protect or A Made in Ottawa Coup?’ points out the coup against Aristide was actually planned on Canadian soil. From January 31-February 1, 2003, Canada’s Secretary of State for Latin America and La Francophonie, Denis Paradis, played host to a high-level roundtable meeting dubbed, The Ottawa Initiative on Haiti. Surprise, surprise, no representative of Haiti’s elected government was invited. However, Otto Reich, then President George W. Bush’s appointee as Assistant Secretary State for the Western Hemisphere, was in attendance. Paradis leaked the fact that this meeting took place to journalist Michael Vastel, who reported the meeting in the March 15, 2003 edition of L’Actualite magazine. Another chapter, ‘Using NGOs to Destroy Democracy and the Canadian Military Connection’ exposes the shameful role played by many Canadian NGOs.”

Trudeau is a self-proclaimed “feminist”. The court is still out on this matter. A recent article in the British based Guardian newspaper questioned the Canadian Prime Minister: “A slight note of exasperation crept into Justin Trudeau’s voice, suggesting that this was a topic he had broached many times before. ‘I’m going to keep saying loud and clearly that I am a feminist until it is met with a shrug,’ he declared to an audience at the United Nations in New York.”

His words sparked delight around the world. But one year on, Trudeau’s heady promises have run into the realities of government, prompting the question: has electing a self-described feminist to helm of the country translated into real change for Canadian women?

Canada’s prime minister is moving the Great White North further to the right on foreign affairs. Trudeau’s father Pierre Elliot Trudeau opened the doors to draft resisters including myself who refused to fight against the Vietnamese people. I saw Africans in America and the Vietnamese as colonial subjects. Africans in the United States were colonized by Uncle Sam and the Vietnamese by the French. Wiki pointed out: “While Canada had previously participated in military action against Iraq  in the Gulf War of 1991, it refused to declare war against Iraq without United Nations approval.

The Iraq War began with the United States-led 2003 invasion. The Government of Canada did not at any time formally declare war against Iraq, and the level and nature of this participation, which changed over time, was controversial.

Prime Minister Jean Chrétien said on 10 October 2002 that Canada would, in fact, be part of a military coalition to invade Iraq if it were sanctioned by the United Nations. However, when the United States and the United Kingdom subsequently withdrew their diplomatic efforts to gain that UN sanction, Jean Chrétien announced in Parliament on 17 March 2003 that Canada would not participate in the pending invasion.”

However, this is not the full story. The “Big White Folks” as Paul Robeson called them speak with forked tongues. “Nevertheless, he offered the US and its soldiers his moral support. However, according to classified U.S. documents released by Wikileaks, a high-ranking Canadian official may have secretly promised to clandestinely support the invasion. Two days earlier, a quarter million people in Montreal had marched against the impending war. Major anti-war demonstrations had taken place in several other Canadian cities.” Chrétien’s moves had more to do with the growing opposition to the invasion than his political morality.  

The not so great white north has a checkered history in the African continent. Canada joined the imperialists and played with the white checkers. They played a significant role in the assassinations of Patrice Lumumba, Maurice Mpolo, and Joseph Okito on January 21, 1961. Ottawa came up on the wrong side of history on the question of the Congo. Yves Engler author of the illuminating volume, Canada in Africa: 300 years of aid and exploitation, pointed out: “Siding with Washington, Ottawa promoted ONUC) and UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold’s controversial anti-Lumumba position. ONUC was established in July 1960 to ensure the withdrawal of Belgian forces. 1,900 Canadian troops participated in the UN mission between 1960 and 1964, making this country’s military one of its more active members. There were almost always more Canadian officers at ONUC headquarters than those of any other nationality and the Canadians were concentrated in militarily important logistical positions including chief operations officer and chief signals officer.”

Canada opposed anticolonial struggles in Africa, supported apartheid South Africa and Idi Amin’s coup against Milton Obote (December 28 1925- October 10, 2005) who had led Uganda to independence in 1962 from British colonialism. He was overthrown by Amin in 1971. Canada played a role in the ousting of Lumumba in the Congo by the CIA, Belgium and Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu Wa Za Banga aka Joseph Mobutu and Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah.

The Great White North pressed African states to follow neoliberal policies, which have benefitted Canadian corporations. The Canadian International Development Perform points out: “Canada is a global mining giant and a leading player in Africa’s mining sector. 70% of the equity capital raised globally by the mining industry was raised on the Toronto (TSX) and Venture (TSXV) exchanges. Of the $10.3 billion in equity raised for mining on the TSX and TSXV in 2012 $1.9 billion or 18.5% was for projects in Latin America while another $1.7 billion or 16.5% was for projects in Africa.”   Canada played a role in the violence the Congo, Rwanda and Somali.  

Canada does have a Black Radical Tradition. However, we cannot expect Corporate Canada or the Black Misleadership Class to tell the story. That is on us on the Black Left.

* THE VIEWS OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHOR AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE PAMBAZUKA NEWS EDITORIAL TEAM

* BROUGHT TO YOU BY PAMBAZUKA NEWS

* Please do not take Pambazuka for granted! Become a Friend of Pambazuka and make a donation NOW to help keep Pambazuka FREE and INDEPENDENT!

* Please send comments to [email=editor@pambazuka.org]editor[at]pambazuka[dot]org[/email] or comment online at Pambazuka News.

Issue Number: 
Article Image Caption | Source: 
File

          Housekeeping - Crowne Plaza Hotel - New York, NY   
I woked in la colombe hotel about 2 years ago for housekeeping in Haiti. New York, NY.... $15 an hour
From Indeed - Thu, 22 Jun 2017 00:33:25 GMT - View all New York, NY jobs
          Haiti’s Troubled Healthcare System   

The World Bank suggests that what Haiti’s healthcare system needs is not just more resources, but a reallocation that focuses on primary care.

The post Haiti’s Troubled Healthcare System appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.


          Sarodj Bertin es la nueva Reina Hispanoamericana de Belleza   

La joven haitiana Sarodj Bertin, de 26 años, fue elegida la noche de hoy como la Reina Hispanoamericana 2012 en la quinta edición de este concurso de belleza celebrado entre 22 aspirantes en la ciudad boliviana de Santa Cruz.

Bertin, que ganó previamente el título de "Mejor Silueta", se destacó ante el jurado con su respuesta a una pregunta sobre las dificultades de ser mujer hoy en día....

          Ulule-Nord Sud   
L’origine du projet Nord-Sud est un projet de livre illustré d’Elsa Mroziewicz et de Saba Niknam, illustratrices et de Cécile Palusinski, écrivain. Nous avions déjà collaboré  en 2010 à l’édition d’un album-CD « L’épopée de Noé »  et nous souhaitions partager une nouvelle aventure humaine et artistique. Voici donc plusieurs années que le projet d’édition NORD SUD fait son […]
          Why the Jews Are Losing the War on College Campuses   

Reprinted from the Times of Israel

According to a recent study conducted by the “Brand Israel Group,” support for Israel among Jewish college students has dropped 27% in the last 6 years. This mirrors a smaller but still significant drop in support among Americans generally, from 76% to 62%. According to Fern Oppenheim, the founder of the Brand Israel Group that conducted the survey, the source of this drop is the perceived lack of shared values between college students and the Jewish state. The same study found that 1 in 3 Jewish students reported anti-Semitic incidents on their campuses. Of these, 59% said that the incidents were related to anti-Israel attitudes. To explain this, Oppenheim blamed a political “atmosphere” on campus that divides the world into oppressor groups and victims, Israel being a symbol of the former.

“We are allowing Israel to be defined by its detractors,” Oppenheim warned, which is unfortunately true. But her proposed remedy to step up efforts to brand Israel as not only a tolerant society but, in fact, the helper of victims, even of its enemies is flawed. To support her strategy, Oppenheim offers the case of Ismail Haniyeh, a leader of Hamas, the terrorist organization sworn to destroy Israel and exterminate its Jews. Oppenheim observes that Haniyeh sent his ill granddaughter to Israel to receive medical treatment because he knew “Israel is too decent to turn her away,” and says: “People need to know this.”

Perhaps they do. But this is clearly not the solution to the problem. If it were, Ismail Haniyeh would have left Hamas and joined Israel’s supporters. Re-branding Israel alone is not the answer to a propaganda war, based on genocidal lies, whose goal is Israel’s destruction. The only viable solution is to do what Jewish organizations have so far refused to do: brand the American supporters of Hamas and the campus promoters of its lies as terrorist enablers and allies.

The strategy of merely promoting Israel’s good deeds, while pretending that Hamas’s American supporters are merely misinformed, is failing for a simple reason: If you are accused of stealing other people’s land, imprisoning them in Gaza-size ghettos, and segregating them by race, the fact that you are sending humanitarian missions to Haiti and other needy cases or providing medical care to your mortal enemies is not going to exculpate you in the eyes of people who have been seduced by Palestinian lies. In their eyes, you are still the oppressor and these good deeds are merely efforts to obscure that evil fact. That is why lesbian leftists at the “Dyke March” in Chicago banned rainbow flags with the Jewish star – even though Israel is the only country in the Middle East where a gay pride parade can be held. They see Israel’s acceptance of gays as “pinkwashing” – a fig leaf provided by one victim group to cover up its crimes against another. The left even has a term for this: “intersectionality.”

The only way to counter such malicious attacks is to brand the campus allies of Hamas for what they are: supporters of genocidal lies and a terrorist war to obliterate the state of Israel and kill its Jews. These American allies of Hamas terrorism include Students for Justice in Palestine, the Muslim Students Association, Jewish Voice for Peace, and assorted leftwing groups who support them.

Students for Justice in Palestine, the leader of this anti-Israel, pro-Hamas coalition was founded in 2001 by Hatem Bazian, a Fatah activist at the time. He created it as an ancillary support for the suicide bombing Second Intifada, launched in that year. The chief funder of SJP and orchestrator of its campaigns is a well-established Hamas front, American Muslims for Palestine. Hatem Bazian is the chairman of the AMP board. Since Hamas is a terrorist organization, Students for Justice in Palestine and its campus coalition are clearly instruments of its terrorist campaigns. They do not themselves plant bombs but they support the terrorists who do and spread their political propaganda, much the way the Irish political party Sinn Fein was a working partner of the terrorist Irish Republican Army.

Stigmatizing the campus supporters of terrorists would effectively neutralize the attacks on Israel. It would provide the basis for a campaign to pressure American universities to withdraw their recognition and funding from these groups. It would discredit the lies that fuel their campus campaigns and inspire the anti-Semitic attacks that have reached epidemic proportions.

The David Horowitz Freedom Center has conducted campaigns that employ this branding principle for ten years at over 100 campuses. But ours has been a lonely voice. At virtually every campus where we have organized events, our efforts have been undermined by Hillel and Students for Israel groups who smear us as “Islamophobic” and “racist,” though we are neither, and who come to the defense of Students for Justice in Palestine as though they were victims and not aggressors. In other words, these Jewish groups prefer to join hands with an organization supporting a genocidal war against Jews, in condemning (in my case) a Jew who doesn’t mince words in opposing our enemies. If Hillel and groups that care about Israel’s survival would instead turn their guns around and brand Israel’s enemies for what they are, the tide of anti-Semitic hatred on campus would begin to reverse itself, and support for the Jewish state would surely grow.


          Haitian apparel workers continue strike, defying threats and violence   
Despite machinations by union leaders, thousands of Haitians continue to demand an increase in the country’s minimum wage.
          Denuncian que persisten engaños a haitianos que llegan al aeropuerto de Pudahuel   
La comunidad haitiana en Chile denuncio el intento de engaño que habría sufrido un compatriota al llegar al Aeropuerto de Pudahuel. Esta situación no sería un hecho aislado, ya que según han denunciando existen hombres que se harían pasar por taxistas para subir a los vehículos a los ciudadanos haitianos que llegan a Chile, quienes … Continua leyendo "Denuncian que persisten engaños a haitianos que llegan al aeropuerto de Pudahuel"
          La Misère au Sein des Richesses (Delorme)   
La Misère au Sein des Richesses: Réflexions Diverses sur Haiti (in French; Paris: E. Dentu, 1873), by D. Delorme (page images at Florida)
          How the US Came to Take an Active Role in War and Torture in Latin America   

Proxy War and Surrogate Terror: How the US Came to Take an Active Role in War and Torture in Latin America

Thursday, June 29, 2017 By John W. Dower, Haymarket Books | Book Excerpt 
Soldiers conduct a static line jump in the Colombian National Training Center on Fort Tolemaida, August 31, 2011. (Photo: The US Army)Soldiers conduct a static line jump in the Colombian National Training Center on Fort Tolemaida, August 31, 2011. (Photo: The US Army)
Although US involvement in torture focused on the Iraq War in the last decade, the United States has had a long involvement by proxy with torture and the killing of peasants and Indigenous peoples in Latin America. In this excerpt from his book, Dower describes the US role in facilitating death and destruction in Latin and South America over the past few decades.
The long and generally shameful history of US overt and covert interventions in South and Central America traces back to the turn of the twentieth century. Before World War II, these incursions, commonly in defense of US business interests, even involved protracted military occupations of Nicaragua (1912-33) and Haiti (1915-34). During the Cold War, intervention was more covert, but just as unrelenting. John Coatsworth, a distinguished scholar of Latin American economic and international history, calculates that between 1948 and 1990 the US government "secured the overthrow of at least twenty-four governments in Latin America, four by direct use of US military forces, three by means of CIA-managed revolts or assassinations, and seventeen by encouraging local military and political forces to intervene without direct US participation, usually through military coups d'état."
Notorious among these postwar intrusions was the overthrow of democratically elected governments in Guatemala (1954), Brazil (1964), and Chile (1973). Nothing, however, obsessed North Americans looking south more than the political event Washington was unable to manipulate: the Cuban revolution that deposed the dictator Fulgencio Batista in the opening days of 1959. This Marxist revolution in the Caribbean was compounded by the alarming nuclear missile crisis of 1962, when the United States discovered Soviet missiles being installed in Cuba. From then on, planners in Washington and their right-wing allies throughout Latin America used the rationale of "preventing another Cuba" to justify clamping down on dissident domestic movements across the board, from militant Marxist agitators to socialists and liberals to anyone critical of the status quo or engaged in working to alleviate misery among the rural and urban poor.
A mid-1960s US congressional investigation reported having "found concrete evidence of at least eight plots involving the CIA to assassinate [Cuban leader] Fidel Castro from 1960 to 1965." This was grist for cloak-and-dagger media reports. More difficult to grasp, or even see, was the sustained manner in which police states south of the border secretly coordinated their crackdowns on critics of all stripes, invariably in the name of anticommunism and invariably with the support of the United States.
A decisive step in this support took place in 1963, when the administration of President John F. Kennedy tasked the army's School of the Americas (SOA), established in 1946 and initially located in Panama under a different name, with training South and Central American military officers and police in counterintelligence and counterinsurgency. The SOA's classes were conducted mostly in Spanish. By the end of the century, the school had trained around fifty-five thousand officers plus roughly four thousand police and civilians from some twenty-two or twenty-three countries. A striking number of its graduates were to become prominent leaders in the "dirty wars" that would ravage Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Peru, El Salvador, Ecuador, Honduras, Panama, and Nicaragua. Along the way, the SOA acquired such derisive sobriquets as School of Assassins, School of Dictators, School of Coups.
Taking sides in dirty wars was typical of the proxy conflicts that engaged the United States and Soviet Union worldwide and shredded the so-called Long Peace of the Cold War. In Latin America, this mostly involved the United States extending funding, training, organizational and operational advice, weapons, logistical intelligence, and the like to authoritarian regimes engaged in "counter-subversive" activities, as well as to right-wing movements dedicated to subverting reformist and left-wing governments. Washington thus found itself supporting state terror on the one hand and violence and terror against the state on the other.
The top-secret South American transnational campaign of state-sponsored terror known as Operation Condor was a beneficiary of covert US support of the former sort. Dating from the late 1960s and formally consolidated in 1975, Condor involved collaborative cross-border intelligence, apprehension, abduction, rendition, interrogation, torture, assassination, and extrajudiciary execution operations among dictatorial regimes in the "Southern Cone" nations of Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia, later joined by Ecuador and Peru. Upwards of fifty thousand to sixty thousand individuals appear to have been killed or "disappeared" in Condor-directed actions in the 1970s and 1980s, with countless thousands imprisoned and, in many cases, tortured. More than a few victims were exiles who had fled their native countries and were engaging in human rights campaigns as refugees.
The targets of this collaborative state terror extended beyond armed militants and avowed Marxists to include anyone associated with criticizing the existing right-wing regimes or advocating social justice. This was spelled out not just in the back rooms of ruling juntas, but also in training provided by the CIA and SOA. We have a clearer picture of this tutelage from instructional materials disclosed over the course of the 1980s and 1990s that became collectively identified in the media as "torture manuals." In these dense manuals, many of them translated into Spanish, "insurgent" and "guerrilla" were the words commonly used to stigmatize critics or dissidents. Terrorism and the Urban Guerrilla, a teaching guide introduced to SOA classes in Spanish in 1987, expresses this succinctly: "Examples of hostile organizations or groups are paramilitary groups, labor unions, and dissident groups." Another SOA manual, Handling of Sources, is even more expansive: "The CI [counterintelligence] agent should consider all organizations as possible guerrilla sympathizers. ... By infiltrating informants in the diverse youth, workers, political, business, social and charitable organizations, we can identify the organizations that include guerrillas among their members." Elsewhere in the instructional guides the identification of explicit targets is extended to refugees, political parties, peasant organizations, intellectuals, teachers and students, universities, priests and nuns, and so on. One appalling quotation translated from a torture manual identifies target groups as "religious workers, labor organizers, student groups, and others in sympathy with the cause of the poor."
Upon assuming power in 1981, the Reagan administration stepped into this violent world with unrestrained ardor and callous indifference to actual conditions on the ground. Despite much evidence to the contrary, the enemy was reaffirmed to be monolithic communism, directed from Moscow and spearheaded by its Cuban apprentice. As 1980s policymakers saw it, the threat was especially dire in Central America. Guatemala, where brutal repression had taken place ever since the CIA coup in 1954, was subjected to continued special attention. El Salvador and Nicaragua also became targets of fervent counterinsurgency -- and insurgency -- campaigns. In El Salvador, the "anticommunist" agenda involved supporting a dictatorial regime against any and all opponents. In Nicaragua, the situation was reversed. There, the Reagan administration devoted almost evangelical energy to nurturing and supporting the Contras, a terrorist "guerrilla" campaign against the left-wing Sandinista government that in 1979, with considerable popular support, had overthrown the brutal, US-supported Somoza family dictatorship that dated back to 1936.
Disclosure of classified texts and other disturbing information pertinent to covert US activity in Central America took place sporadically but frequently between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s. Much of this focused on the sensational (and farcical) Reagan-era "Iran-Contra" scandal that broke open in 1986 and involved a convoluted plot to obtain funds for the right-wing insurgents in Nicaragua by using Israel as an intermediary to sell weapons to fundamentalist and anti-American Iran for use in its war with Iraq (to which the United States was also providing support). The less remembered CIA and SOA written materials that surfaced during these years existed at a low level in the hierarchy of covert activity and were not policy documents, but for good reason they also caused a stir. They provide a glimpse into the mindset behind anticommunist covert activities, and a graphic case study of what "exporting Americanism" in this last decade of the Cold War involved at ground level.
The first significant instructional manual to come to public attention was a guide in Spanish prepared by the CIA for the Contras. Titled Psychological Operations in Guerrilla Warfare in the original English draft, this eighty-nine-page text was greeted with shock in the United States when exposed by journalists in 1984. After introducing it as "a primer on insurgency, a how-to book in the struggle for hearts and minds," for example, Time magazine went on to observe: "Some of the 'techniques of persuasion' are benign: helping the peasants harvest crops, learn to read, improve hygiene. Others are decidedly brutal: assassination, kidnaping, blackmail, mob violence. It could be a manual for the Viet Cong or the Cuban-backed rebels in El Salvador. If it were, the Administration would likely be waving it as proof of the thesis about the sources of insidious world terrorism."
Complementing Psychological Operations and also exposed in 1984 was another CIA Spanish-language project: a cartoon booklet airdropped into Nicaragua. Titled (in the English translation) The Freedom Fighter's Manual, this was as crude and pedestrian as Psychological Operations was vicious, but still disturbing in its own way as an exercise in low-level terrorist activity. It instructed citizens in scores of acts of vandalism (cutting cables, sabotaging machinery, putting dirt or water in gasoline tanks, setting fires, freeing farm animals, and so on) that might help bring the left-wing Sandinista government to its knees.
The torture manuals, which came to belated public attention in the 1990s, consisted of seven Spanish-language SOA texts, totaling 1,169 pages. These were distributed to military officers in eleven South and Central American countries between 1987 and 1991 and also used by instructors in School of the Americas classes. The manuals reflected teaching materials used since 1982, when the Reagan administration dismissed the human rights concerns tentatively initiated during the Carter presidency. These SOA resources were complemented by two CIA "counterintelligence" manuals -- one recycled from 1963, and one dated 1983 that essentially replicated this.

TRUTHOUT PROGRESSIVE PICK


The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II
How has the United States shaped the face of modern warfare?

Click here now to get the book!


While the torture manuals open a small window onto Washington's pervasive disregard for democracy, human rights, and the rule of law when it came to covert activities, they also cast light in other directions. One is the care taken to ensure a measure of plausible deniability about what was really being promoted. Rhetorically, this was done with euphemisms and genuflections to propriety: death squads were referred to as "Freedom Commandos" and "Freedom Fighters," for example, and slogans like fighting for "God, Homeland, and Democracy" were promoted. Procedurally, a measure of plausible deniability was obtained by directing CIA and SOA activity largely to pedagogy rather than actual hands-on violence -- without calling attention to the fact that this involved teaching right-wing military, paramilitary, and police forces how to most efficiently engage in infiltration, interrogation, torture, terror, and "neutralization" of perceived enemies.
Once these various manuals became public, Washington's predictable machinery of "public diplomacy" went into motion. The SOA teaching guides were declared "inconsistent with U.S. policy." The school's course offerings also were said to include respect for human rights. "Objectionable and questionable" passages amounted to no more than two dozen -- and in any case were nothing more than a "mistake" made by some misguided junior officer working from "outdated intelligence materials." Problematic statements had "escaped oversight." "A few bad apples" were involved in promoting, or practicing, torture. And in any case, excesses had been "corrected."
This was, as all spin is, disingenuous. The manuals were indeed wordy -- they are numbing to read -- but what SOA teachers emphasized and their students found most engaging was precisely what caused these materials to be called torture manuals. This was confirmed by Major Joseph Blair, a covert operative who (like remorseful members of the nuclear priesthood and repentant tell-all CIA agents) ultimately came in from the cold. Blair had held a responsible position administering the CIA-led Phoenix assassination program during the Vietnam War, and in the early 1980s had moved on to the SOA, where he assisted the creator of the controversial manuals in the classroom. Interviewed in 1997, after having retired in 1989, he described "primarily using manuals which we used during the Vietnam War in our intelligence-gathering techniques. The techniques included murder, assassination, torture, extortion, false imprisonment."
Turning to the argument that objectionable passages were but a minuscule part of the 1,100-plus pages of SOA instructional materials, Blair pointed out that "the officers who ran the intelligence courses used lesson plans that included the worst materials contained in the seven manuals. Now they say that there were only eighteen to twenty passages in those manuals in clear violations of US law. In fact, those same passages were at the heart of the intelligence instruction." As for the claim that SOA instructors took care to teach human rights, he noted that this amounted to a few hours and was roundly regarded by instructors and students alike as a joke.
Copyright (2017) of John W. Dower. Not to be reprinted without permission of the publisher, Haymarket Books.

JOHN W. DOWER

John W. Dower is professor emeritus of history at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His many books include War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War and Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War Two, which have won numerous prizes including the Pulitzer, the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle award.  His latest book, The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War Two(Dispatch Books), has just been published.


              Heaven.Can.Wait   

    February's Playlist





    We'll Be A Dream
    We The Kings feat. Demi Lovato


    awesome



    Today Was A Fairytale
    Taylor Swift







    Blah Blah Blah
    Ke$ha Featuring 3OH!3






    Hallelujah
    Justin Timberlake & Matt Morris Featuring Charlie Sexton




    If We Ever Meet Again
    Timbaland feat Katy Perry

    awesome



    Redemption Song
    Rihanna






    I Got You
    Leona Lewis






    Our Kind Of Love
    Lady Antebellum






    Lady GaGa
    Alejandro

    awesome



    Who I Am
    Nick Jonas and the Administration






    Stranded (Haiti Mon Amour)
    Jay-Z, Bono, The Edge & Rihanna






    Rock That Body
    Black Eyed Peas


    awesome



    Shots
    LMFAO Feat. Lil Jon

    awesome



    Follow Me Down
    3OH!3 Feat. Neon Hitch





    Alice
    Avril Lavigne



    Ketika Cinta Bertasbih
    Melly Goeslaw



    Drama King
    Meet Uncle Hussein/Black

    awesome



    Cari Jodoh
    Wali




    空位
    Anson 胡彦斌





    切歌
    Sam 李圣杰





    外面的世界
    Karen 莫文蔚





    玩乐
    方大同

    awesome



    WISH
    Janice 卫兰




    生理时钟
    罗志祥


    awesome



    热辣辣
    Jacky 张学友




    超级白
    HE有激人

    awesome



    大日子
    My Astro 大合唱

              V/a - Vodou Drums In Haiti 2: The Living Gods Of Haiti 21st Century Ritual Drums & Spirit Possession - Uk2lp - Sjrlp 371 - Soul Jazz Records   
    none
                 
    US Pressure: UN Agrees on Deep Cuts to Peacekeeping
    AFP, United Nations

    A deal on cutting nearly $600 million from the UN peacekeeping budget was reached Wednesday following weeks of negotiations over US demands for sharp cost reductions, UN diplomats said.

    Under the deal reached by a General Assembly budget committee, the United Nations will spend $7.3 billion on peacekeeping in the coming year, down from the current $7.87 billion -- roughly a seven percent cut -- according to diplomats familiar with the negotiations.

    The United States, the biggest financial contributor to peacekeeping, had sought a nearly $1 billion cut to the bill and the European Union had also pushed for savings to bring costs down to $7.3 billion.

    US Ambassador Nikki Haley claimed victory in a statement, saying "just five months into our time here, we've already been able to cut over half a billion dollars from the UN peacekeeping budget and we're only getting started."

    Hardest hit by the cuts will be the UN missions in Sudan's troubled region of Darfur and in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the two costliest operations with budgets that run over $1 billion.

    A Security Council diplomat who spoke on condition of anonymity said however there will be "cuts across the board" in the 13 peacekeeping missions as a result of US pressure.

    Washington pays 28.5 percent of the peacekeeping budget and 22 percent of the UN's core budget of $5.4 billion.

    French Ambassador Francois Delattre said the deal will allow UN missions to "fully implement their mandate while being more efficient."

    "The savings proposed in this budget have been carefully targeted," said Delattre.

    The deal falls short of the request from UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who had asked for $7.97 billion for the annual budget which runs from July 1 to June 30 of next year.

    It also is less than what African countries had proposed: they wanted $7.7 billion for the UN missions.

    The deal is expected to be approved by the UN General Assembly on Friday.

    The Security Council is expected to vote as early as today on significant cuts to the 17,000-strong joint African Union-UN mission in Darfur known as UNAMID.

    Britain on Wednesday circulated a draft resolution that provides for a two-stage drawdown over the next 12 months, in line with the recommendations of a joint AU-UN report released last month.

    The measure would cut UNAMID force levels to reach 8,735 troops and 2,500 police by June 2018, a 44 percent cut in military personnel and nearly 30 percent in police, according to the draft text obtained by AFP.

    The drawdown could be reviewed if the Sudanese government fails to ensure protection in those areas from where the peacekeepers will withdraw.

    Under the proposed measure, Guterres will report to the council after six months on whether "conditions on the ground remain conducive to further reductions."

    The draft resolution welcomes a "reduction in military confrontations between government forces and rebel groups," but rights groups maintain that the conflict in Darfur is far from over.

    Human Rights Watch has criticized the proposed cuts as "misguided," saying civilians in Darfur still need protection.

    Darfur has been engulfed in conflict since 2003, when ethnic minority insurgents mounted a rebellion against President Omar al-Bashir, complaining that his Arab-dominated government was marginalizing the region.

    The United Nations has shut down its mission in Ivory Coast and is planning to pull its peacekeepers out of Haiti in the coming months.

    France late Wednesday circulated a draft resolution on renewing the UN mission in Mali, known as MINUSMA, but no cuts are planned.

    The mission would continue to operate with 13,289 troops and 1,920 police, according to the draft resolution seen by AFP.

    A vote on renewing the Mali mission could take place today.

              David Horowitz on Genocidal, Campus Anti-Semitism   
    Re-posted by Nicholas Stix


    Why the Jews are Losing the War on College Campuses

    A failure to brand the American accomplices of terrorism

    By David Horowitz
    Reprinted from the Times of Israel.

    According to a recent study conducted by the “Brand Israel Group,” support for Israel among Jewish college students has dropped 27% in the last 6 years. This mirrors a smaller but still significant drop in support among Americans generally, from 76% to 62%. According to Fern Oppenheim, the founder of the Brand Israel Group that conducted the survey, the source of this drop is the perceived lack of shared values between college students and the Jewish state. The same study found that 1 in 3 Jewish students reported anti-Semitic incidents on their campuses. Of these, 59% said that the incidents were related to anti-Israel attitudes. To explain this, Oppenheim blamed a political “atmosphere” on campus that divides the world into oppressor groups and victims, Israel being a symbol of the former.

    “We are allowing Israel to be defined by its detractors,” Oppenheim warned, which is unfortunately true. But her proposed remedy to step up efforts to brand Israel as not only a tolerant society but, in fact, the helper of victims, even of its enemies is flawed. To support her strategy, Oppenheim offers the case of Ismail Haniyeh, a leader of Hamas, the terrorist organization sworn to destroy Israel and exterminate its Jews. Oppenheim observes that Haniyeh sent his ill granddaughter to Israel to receive medical treatment because he knew “Israel is too decent to turn her away,” and says: “People need to know this.”

    Perhaps they do. But this is clearly not the solution to the problem. If it were, Ismail Haniyeh would have left Hamas and joined Israel’s supporters. Re-branding Israel alone is not the answer to a propaganda war, based on genocidal lies, whose goal is Israel’s destruction. The only viable solution is to do what Jewish organizations have so far refused to do: brand the American supporters of Hamas and the campus promoters of its lies as terrorist enablers and allies.

    The strategy of merely promoting Israel’s good deeds, while pretending that Hamas’s American supporters are merely misinformed, is failing for a simple reason: If you are accused of stealing other people’s land, imprisoning them in Gaza-size ghettos, and segregating them by race, the fact that you are sending humanitarian missions to Haiti and other needy cases or providing medical care to your mortal enemies is not going to exculpate you in the eyes of people who have been seduced by Palestinian lies. In their eyes, you are still the oppressor and these good deeds are merely efforts to obscure that evil fact. That is why lesbian leftists at the “Dyke March” in Chicago banned rainbow flags with the Jewish star – even though Israel is the only country in the Middle East where a gay pride parade can be held. They see Israel’s acceptance of gays as “pinkwashing” – a fig leaf provided by one victim group to cover up its crimes against another. The left even has a term for this: “intersectionality.”

    The only way to counter such malicious attacks is to brand the campus allies of Hamas for what they are: supporters of genocidal lies and a terrorist war to obliterate the state of Israel and kill its Jews. These American allies of Hamas terrorism include Students for Justice in Palestine, the Muslim Students Association, Jewish Voice for Peace, and assorted leftwing groups who support them.

    [N.S.: “[B]rand the campus allies of Hamas for what they are: supporters of genocidal lies…” Is David Horowitz wimping out from calling out genocidal anti-Semites by name, or am I being pedantic?]

    Students for Justice in Palestine, the leader of this anti-Israel, pro-Hamas coalition was founded in 2001 by Hatem Bazian, a Fatah activist at the time. He created it as an ancillary support for the suicide bombing Second Intifada, launched in that year. The chief funder of SJP and orchestrator of its campaigns is a well-established Hamas front, American Muslims for Palestine. Hatem Bazian is the chairman of the AMP board. Since Hamas is a terrorist organization, Students for Justice in Palestine and its campus coalition are clearly instruments of its terrorist campaigns. They do not themselves plant bombs but they support the terrorists who do and spread their political propaganda, much the way the Irish political party Sinn Fein was a working partner of the terrorist Irish Republican Army.

    Stigmatizing the campus supporters of terrorists would effectively neutralize the attacks on Israel. It would provide the basis for a campaign to pressure American universities to withdraw their recognition and funding from these groups. It would discredit the lies that fuel their campus campaigns and inspire the anti-Semitic attacks that have reached epidemic proportions.

    The David Horowitz Freedom Center has conducted campaigns that employ this branding principle for ten years at over 100 campuses. But ours has been a lonely voice. At virtually every campus where we have organized events, our efforts have been undermined by Hillel and Students for Israel groups who smear us as “Islamophobic” and “racist,” though we are neither, and who come to the defense of Students for Justice in Palestine as though they were victims and not aggressors. In other words, these Jewish groups prefer to join hands with an organization supporting a genocidal war against Jews, in condemning (in my case) a Jew who doesn’t mince words in opposing our enemies. If Hillel and groups that care about Israel’s survival would instead turn their guns around and brand Israel’s enemies for what they are, the tide of anti-Semitic hatred on campus would begin to reverse itself, and support for the Jewish state would surely grow.


              A Few ASOS Bikini Models Have Stretch Marks, but Is That Enough?   

    As we head into a holiday weekend that celebrates our independence from the UK, we want to take a moment and tip our hats to the Brits for giving us a major boost of body positivity. As Twitter has noticed, ASOS didn't edit out its beautiful model's stretch marks.

    Take a look for yourself.




    Girl looks great, right? There you have it - everyone: you, me, ASOS models, even Chrissy Teigen has stretch marks and it's really NBD. Just in case you need any more proof that people are responding to this massive win, you can check Twitter.

    Of course, while the photos are a step in the right direction, some noted that this is by no means representative of all women's bodies.

    Don't forget that ASOS has come under fire before for categorizing a model with a 29-inch waist as plus-size. The site has also been accused of cultural appropriation by retailing a hair clip that bore resemblance to a South Asian tikka without explaining its symbolic importance (the brand later apologized).

    Regardless, work your dang bikini this weekend and know that we're a smidge closer to better representation.


              Países que já foram governados por ditadores   

    ® Alemanha (1933-1945)

    ® Argélia (1965-1994)

    ® Argentina (1976-1983)

    ® Áustria (1933-1938), (1938-1945)

    ® Bangladesh (1975-1979) , (1982-1990) e (1997)

    ® Bolívia (1971-1985)

    ® Brasil (1937-1945) e (1964-1985)

    ® Burkina Faso (1966-1991)

    ® Burundi (1966-1993)

    ® República Centro-Africana (1966-1993) e (2003-2005)

    ® Chile (1973-1989)

    ® China (1916-1927 ou 1920-1922)

    ® Colômbia (1953-1957)

    ® Cuba (1933-1959) e (1959-presente)

    ® República do Congo (1968-1992)

    ® República Democrática do Congo (1965-1997)

    ® República Dominicana (1889-1899) e (1930-1961)

    ® El Salvador (1931-1979)

    ® Equador (1972-1979)

    ® Espanha (1923-1930) e (1939-1975)

    ® Etiópia (1974-1991)

    ® Filipinas (1972-1981)

    ® França (1799-1814) e (1814-1815)

    ® Guatemala (1970-1985)

    ® Guiné (1984-1991)

    ® Guiné Equatorial (1968-1982)

    ® Haiti (1957-1990)

    ® Honduras (1963-1974)

    ® Indonésia (1967-1998)

    ® Iraque (1958-1968)

    ® Itália (1922-1943)

    ® Japão (1932-1945)

    ® Libéria (1980-1990)

    ® Madagáscar (1972-1975)

    ® Mauritânia (1978-1992) e (2005-2007)

    ® México (1853-1855) e (1876-1910)

    ® Nicarágua (1967-1979)

    ®

              If House Really Wants Role on Juvenile Justice Reform, It Has Options   
    A subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing yesterday entitled “Juvenile Justice Reform in the Modern Era.” They heard from juvenile justice officials in Georgia (Joe Vignati), Indiana (Devon McDonald), Liz Ryan of Youth First and Jim SaintGermain, a young man from Haiti who entered New ...
              Censura 2008   
    “Come ogni anno, Nuovi Mondi si occupa di informazione e giornalismo. Lo fa con “Censura 2008. Le 25 notizie più censurate”, l’annuario curato da Peter Phillips e Project Censored sulle notizie che avrebbero dovuto occupare le prime pagine dei giornali del mondo e che invece sono state del tutto ignorate.

    Eccone alcune:
    • Nel dicembre 2006 i soldati della Missione di Stabilizzazione delle Nazioni Unite a Haiti hanno commesso uccisioni indiscriminate nella comunità di Cité Soleil, il quartiere più povero di Haiti, dove vivono in miseria circa 200.000 persone. L’azione era una vera e propria rappresaglia a seguito delle manifestazioni in cui circa 10.000 persone chiedevano il ritorno del presidente Aristide e condannavano l’occupazione militare del loro paese.

    • Gli Usa importano molto più petrolio dall’Africa che dall’Arabia Saudita. A settembre 2008, l’Amministrazione americana aprirà l’AFRICOM, un nuovo centro di comando del Pentagono per prevenire la guerra al terrore nel continente africano. In realtà, tra gli scopi occulti di questa missione, vi è il tentativo di frenare la penetrazione cinese: le implicazioni politiche di una crescita economica africana in stretta alleanza con la Cina potrebbe sfociare in una nuova guerra fredda in cui l’AFRICOM giocherà un ruolo chiave.

    • Il simbolo della ricostruzione irachena, l’ambasciata americana a Baghdad, è stata affidata a dei contractor kuwaitiani che, sotto ordine statunitense, stanno sfruttando quasi esclusivamente lavoratori del sud-est asiatico. Centinaia di uomini sono stai ingannati, condotti di nascosto in una sorta di campi di concentramento e obbligati a mesi di lavoro forzato. È stato loro confiscato il passaporto e sono stati costretti a risarcire ai datori di lavoro le spese per il reclutamento, indebitandosi per mesi o addirittura anni prima di riscattare la propria posizione.

    • Che la Blackwater sia la più grande compagnia di mercenari al mondo e che in Iraq i suoi uomini non siano soggetti ad alcuna legge, è cosa ormai tristemente nota. Quello che non è stato diffuso è che la missione irachena ha fruttato al fondatore della compagnia, Erik Prince, oltre 800 milioni di dollari in contratti, permettendogli così di creare un vero e proprio esercito privato il cui scopo è la difesa cristiana in tutto il mondo rispetto all’avanzare islamico

    Inoltre, in aggiunta alle informazioni la cui conoscenza cambierebbe la percezione degli eventi e le idee della gente, Project Censored passa in rassegna anche le notizie frivole che hanno occupato i media di tutto il mondo sottraendo tempo e spazio alle VERE notizie. Qualche esempio?

    • La saga di Britney Spears, tra alcool, droghe e rehab.
    • La morte di Anna Nicole Smith e l’attribuzione della paternità di sua figlia.
    • La nascita della figlia di Brad Pitt e Angelina Jolie e la loro nuova adozione.
    • Il divorzio di Paul McCartney.
    • L’adozione da parte di Madonna di un bimbo africano.

    Per trent’anni Project Censored ha raccolto notizie importanti che i principali gruppi mediatici hanno ampiamente ignorato, dando spazio anche alle più piccole e frammentarie informazioni.

    Anche quest’anno, Censura ci ricorda che la missione imprescindibile di un giornalista in un paese democratico non cambia e non deve cambiare: il controllo delle istituzioni al potere. Ma “l’informazione come cane da guardia del potere” appare sempre più spesso, purtroppo, un precetto astratto. Chiunque lavori – o abbia lavorato – all’interno del sistema dei media, sa bene che questo si fonda su un modello di premi e punizioni volto a garantire che la maggioranza rispetti linee di condotta predeterminate e standardizzate.

    Secondo l’analisi di Project Censored, gli elementi che concorrono a limitare la missione dei giornalisti sono varie, tra cui: forzature ideologiche, la struttura degli organi d’informazione, il potere degli inserzionisti e la cosiddetta pratica del giornalismo “obiettivo” che, paradossalmente, intralcia i media proprio nella ricerca delle verità fondamentali.
              Encuentran mujer muerta dentro de un saco en Las Matas de Santa Cruz   
    Montecristi-. Una joven de nacionalidad haitiana fue encontrada muerta y con los pies atados, en el interior de un saco tirado en unos matorrales en el municipio de Las Matas de Santa Cruz. 

    El cuerpo sin vida de la extranjera Rosany Lochat, de 24 años de edad, fue encontrado en avanzado estado de descomposición, dentro de un saco, en la calle Gaspar Polanco de esa población. 

    Como no se pudo determinar las causas de la muerte, el cadáver fue enviado al Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Forenses de la ciudad de Santiago para fines de autopsia. 

    Sharitaba Lochat, hermana de la hoy occisa, dijo a la Policía que la misma estaba desaparecida desde el pasado domingo, luego de sostener una discusión con su pareja sentimental Edrin Yan, el cual desde entonces se marchó del lugar con destino desconocido.

              Miles de haitianos están expuestos a la deportación   
    Miles de nacionales haitianos y otros extranjeros beneficiados en el Grupo A del Plan Nacional de Regularización de Extranjeros (PNRE) en situación migratoria irregular en la República Dominicana están expuestos a ser deportados del país debido a que en la primera quincena de este mes venció el último plazo del Ministerio de Interior y Policía para que regularizaran su estatus migratorio.

    De los 238,000 extranjeros haitianos que se acogieron al plan de regularización, en el último plazo otorgado en 2015 sólo esos 143,000 tenían el carnet que se vencía el 17 de julio.

    Sin embargo, ante la Junta Central Electoral (JCE) solo inscribieron unos 53,000 nacionales haitianos que se acogieron al PNRE, pero de esos la JCE solamente ha podido identificar a 15,000.

    En el Grupo B, ante la JCE se registraron unas 8,000 personas a fin de poder naturalizarse, y de esos solo 4,500 reunieron todos los requisitos.

    Es de recordar que el PNRE es un régimen especial para dotar de documento de identidad y permiso de residencia a nacionales extranjeros que no estaban residiendo legalmente en la República Dominicana.

    Actualmente hay una gran cantidad de migrantes que no se le ha expedido el carnet, ya que algunos no completaron el expediente en el plazo establecido por el decreto 327, mientras a otros se les ha comunicado que, a pesar de que aplicaron de forma correcta, sus documentos se han extraviado y esas personas no han podido adquirirlos en original.
    Otro grupo al que se le expidieron carnets no ha podido ser ubicado por las autoridades, mientras otros solo tienen un sello en sus pasaportes, cuyo plazo de vigencia vence entre junio y julio.

    Es el caso de Julio Wilson Tiburcio, Cleotilde Seuberán, residentes en el Pequeño Haití, en la ciudad de Santo Domingo, quienes no esconden su temor de qué pasará con ellos. Y lo mismo externaron otros residentes en el sector, donde la mayoría de los trabajadores informales son haitianos.

    De acuerdo con la abogada de derechos humanos Evarista Rodríguez, los problemas surgidos con este grupo se debe a que el Estado erró en la forma en cómo se aplicó el plan, ya que los requisitos que impuso eran casi imposibles para los migrantes, como son la parte económica, que algunos no calificaban y no podían cumplir.

    En este aspecto coincide con Genaro Rincón, abogado de Juliana Deguis y las niñas Dilcia Oliven Yean y Violeta Bosico Cof, quien observa que el Estado no hizo un empadronamiento de los trabajadores migrantes haitianos región por región, es decir, ir casa por casa para empadronar a todos los grupos, y así hubiera sido más efectivo, ya que las informaciones se procesarían por región y se harían en las gobernaciones para gestionar sus carnets.

    Grupo B

    En el caso del Grupo B los abogados Rodríguez y Rincón observan que el Estado está entrampado en cómo resolver la situación migratoria de los hijos de haitianos o extranjeros nacidos en el país.

    En el régimen especial creado para el Grupo B, que son hijos de haitianos nacidos en territorio dominicano e inscritos irregularmente en el Registro Civil, aplicaron unas 8,000 personas a fin de poder naturalizarse, y de esos solo 4,500 reunieron todos los requisitos, lo que coloca en situación de vulnerabilidad a los restantes 3,500.

    Otros pertenecientes a este grupo, de acuerdo con la Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos (CNDH) sencillamente se resisten a inscribirse en el libro de Extranjería de la JCE debido a que entienden que eso significa negarse a ellos mismos la condición de dominicanos por nacimiento.

    El Estado entrampado

    Para Genaro Rincón, el entrampamiento del Estado dominicano con respecto al Grupo B radica en que una vez se reconozca los derechos de los cañeros hay que reconocer la legitimidad de sus descendientes, por un lado, y por el otro en que ya debe entregar los documentos definitivos a los que se acogieron a este régimen especial.

    “Si el Estado aplica los convenios de contratación resuelve el problema de documentación del grupo A, porque confirma de que los padres son regulares, ya que los acuerdos tienen rango constitucional; y resuelven el problema del Grupo B, porque se demuestra que nacieron aquí y son dominicanos nacidos legalmente”, apunta.

    Recuerda que “los cañeros llegaron de forma regular y han permanecido regular, y que esos convenios establecen que el Estado los dotaría de un permiso de residencia y una cédula para extranjeros, así como un carnet migratorio”.

    Pone como ejemplo de esto que en septiembre de 2014 elevó ante el Tribunal Superior Administrativo una acción de amparo a favor de 2,709 trabajadores haitianos que llegaron bajo los convenios citados, lo que provocó que el entonces director general de Migración, general Rubén Paulino Sem, emitiera la resolución DGM-042015, otorgando la residencia dominicana a esos trabajadores.

    Por el otro lado están las personas que se les expidieron sus carnets como migrantes regularizados, entre ellos los del Grupo B.

    Los extranjeros regularizados están en la etapa de adquirir la cédula para extranjeros para luego naturalizarse, pero esto choca con la Ley de Naturalización, que no prevé la naturalización para un conglomerado, sino que lo hace para personas, y tiene sus propios requisitos.

    “Uno de los requisitos es tener un pasaporte del país donde es originario, y el Estado dominicano no se lo da porque dice que son extranjeros. El Estado tiene el tranque de que para nacionalizarlos a ellos deben tener un pasaporte de donde nacieron, y el Estado no sabe cómo enganchar a este grupo con la ley ordinaria. En ese sentido, esta situación coloca a esos inmigrantes en condición de apatridia, porque el Estado dominicano le niega el pasaporte y el haitiano también”, precisa.

    Extender el plazo

    Para los abogados Genaro Rincón y Evarista Rodríguez ante el vencimiento del último plazo, y debido a los errores en que ha caído el Estado en la aplicación del PNRE, lo recomendable es que se extienda el periodo.

    Las extensiones de los plazos vencen este mes

    Atendiendo al pedido de instituciones nacionales e internacionales, el viernes 31 de octubre de 2015 el Presidente Medina promulgó la Ley 520-14, que extiende el plazo para que las personas descendientes de padres extranjeros en condición migratoria irregular, que habiendo nacido en el territorio nacional no figuran inscritos en el Registro Civil, puedan solicitar el registro y regularización migratoria contemplados en la Ley y su Reglamento de Aplicación. Igualmente pasó un año después, y el martes 12 de julio de 2016, el Gobierno extendió por un año el permiso de permanencia en el país a los inmigrantes que se acogieron al Plan Nacional de Regularización de Extranjeros, que fueron carnetizados y que por diversos motivos no pudieron completar la documentación. Los plazos vencen este mes.

    Expertos

    El plan de regularización no es acorde con la ley de naturalizaación vigente y eso tiene al gobierno entrampado”
    Genaro Rincón
    Abogado

    La regularización no ha cumplido con lo esperado, y se hace necesario la extensión de un nuevo plazo”
    Evarista Rodríguez
    Abogada
    (Fuente: elcaribe.com.do)

              Jean Beausejour, la madurez del orgullo haitiano de la Roja   
    El exjugador de América se ha convertido en un baluarte en la generación dorada de Chile.
              Fashion, Parenting, Politics, & More   
    The May 2017 issue of Word&Way includes many photos and stories about living faithfully in and out of church. Here are the pieces I wrote for the issue:
    • My editorial, Prayers of a Preschool Parent, on learning about faith from my five-year-old son. 
    • An article, MBC Breaks Single-Alignment Rules, on hypocrisy by the Missouri Baptist Convention.
    • An article, Unethical Church Clothes? [not online], on an effort by Baptist World Aid Australia to grade the ethics of clothing companies.
    • An article, Supreme Court Justices Hear Church-State Case from Missouri [not online], on teh oral arguments in the Trinity Lutheran case.
    • A Q&A interview with Missouri Lt. Governor Mike Parson.
    Other pieces in the issue include:
    Get your subscription now (for only $17.50 a year) so you don't miss out!


    (it's nice seeing copies of the magazine out in the wild; took this at Grace Baptist Church in Kansas City, Mo.)

              More News   
    https://urbanintellectuals.com/2015/08/31/can-you-believe-a-black-man-was-stopped-ticketed-for-making-direct-eye-contact-with-police-officer/#.WVEiq0opCEd

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/04/red-cross-haiti-report_n_7511080.html

    https://www.freedomunited.org/

    http://therealnews.com/t2/story:19413:Hersh%3A-Trump-Ignored-Intel-Before-Bombing-Syria
              Director Of Operations, Haiti   
    experience; Experience managing the finances for large USAID-funded contracts; Experience with donor- or government-funded...
              Director Of Operations, Haiti   
    experience; Experience managing the finances for large USAID-funded contracts; Experience with donor- or government-funded...
              Ban Ki-moon's UN legacy clouded by cholera   

    Nearly a month after UN officials announced the idea of a special $400 million package to deal with cholera in Haiti, almost no donors have agreed to fund assistance for its victims. UN peacekeepers imported the disease from Nepal to the Caribbean nation in October 2010. Cholera has since killed 9,100 Haitians and the UN has only recently started to acknowledge its responsibility.

    The idea of a package of "material assistance" for victims and survivors was floated by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon after the publication of a searing report on the crisis by a human rights advisor. Philip Alston, a professor of Law at New York University and the UN’s special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, called the organisation’s years of denials that it brought cholera to Haiti "a disgrace”.

    However the aid package itself is not off to a promising start: "It is really hard to advance this plan for material assistance without having some certainty that there will be money," said Ban’s Haiti cholera point man David Nabarro. "At the same time it is hard to have certainty that there will be money without clarity on what the actual material assistance might look like."

    After Alston’s report was leaked to The New York Times in August, Ban’s office for the first time conceded that the UN had a "moral responsibility" to provide "material assistance" in response to the cholera outbreak, but stopped short of admitting responsibility or apologising.

    Citing existing mechanisms for the UN to settle claims of negligence while maintaining its immunity, Alston said the "new policy remains critically incomplete" without a formal confession and apology. Ban is losing time to make amends before he leaves the job at the end of the year.

    A tarnished legacy

    "Ban's failings in Haiti are one of the worst stains on his legacy, and the clock is running down on his chance to make it right," said Beatrice Lindstrom, staff attorney at IJDH, a legal group that has filed claims on behalf of cholera victims. "Ban must issue a public apology to the people of Haiti, and follow through on his promise of a ‘new response’ with real action."

    Alston wrote in his report, "the lamentably self-serving legal contortions devised to escape any form of legal responsibility still remain in place… Unless the new process also involves a reconsideration in this regard, the [UN’s] ability to salvage its moral, let alone its legal, credibility and authority will be gravely undermined."

    The office of the secretary-general did not respond when asked if Ban would apologise and take legal responsibility in a speech to the General Assembly on 1 December.

    Nabarro, appointed to oversee cholera relief operations in Haiti, says the terms and breakdown of funding of the “material assistance” plan are still being determined. Nabarro, who headed the UN’s Ebola response in West Africa, has met extensively with member states, but says the overall response to multiple Haiti appeals is lacklustre. Hurricane Matthew, which struck on 4 October, has increased humanitarian needs and sparked a rise in cholera cases.

    As of late October, UN member states have pledged to contribute just 18 percent of a $2.1 billion national plan to eliminate cholera up until 2022; the more general 2016 Humanitarian Response Plan for Haiti is only 33 percent funded; and a $119.9 million flash appeal in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, which Nabarro says is currently the most pressing need, is also less than half funded.

    A two-track plan

    The new package is expected to be split into two $200 million "tracks" – one aimed at eradicating cholera and funding sanitation improvements, and another to provide what has been termed "material assistance" for victims or communities, though the specifics are still hazy (Nabarro said he did not want to raise expectations in Haiti by offering hypothetical details).

    UN officials have taken pains to avoid characterising this tranche of funding as compensation – something critics and lawyers for victims say only adds another layer to the UN’s convoluted handling of its legal position on the crisis.

    Nabarro said that just one member state had agreed to earmark donations towards material assistance specifically. Other donors are more willing to fund the overall cholera response, or track one, but appear to be steering clear of the more politicised second tranche.

    "There’s quite a lot of pressure on us officials to have a concept for the material support package... with sufficient clarity for us to engage with member states so that they can decide how they want to deal with it," Nabarro said in an interview with IRIN.

    One scenario, Nabarro surmised, could be to fund the material assistance through assessed contributions (UN member states’ obligatory dues). But some countries have balked at that, concerned they could be on the hook for other serious negligence attributed to the UN. Critics, including Alston, say that fear is either misguided or, should such claims exist, is something the UN needs to bring out into the open.

    "This is the moment of truth for the UN's leadership, but it's also a moment of truth for the UN's member states," said Lindstrom of IJDH, which filed claims with the UN on behalf of 5,000  cholera victims, as well as a class action lawsuit against the UN in the US federal court. "If they're not ultimately willing to step forward and invest in a just response, then the promise of a more accountable UN rings hollow."

    In August, a US federal appeals court upheld that the UN was not subject to lawsuits in the US. Lindstrom said that this week an extension had been granted allowing the plaintiffs in the case until 17 January to file with the US Supreme Court. In the meantime, she said they would continue pressuring the UN to act on its own.

    (TOP PHOTO: Aid workers on a cholera response mission, Haiti, 2013. Nancy Palus/IRIN)

    so/bp/ag

     

     

    Aid workers with ACTED cross a river during a cholera response mission. Les Cayes, Haiti. (November 2013) Analysis Aid and Policy Health Ban Ki-moon's UN legacy clouded by cholera Samuel Oakford IRIN NEW YORK Americas Haiti Nepal
              When disaster strikes, should China do more?   

    Sixty-two Chinese rescuers and six sniffer dogs were the first global team on the ground in Nepal the day after a massive earthquake devastated the country just over a year ago.

    The quick deployment was a sign of China’s growing role in emergencies, but critics say its humanitarian contributions are still paltry compared to its economic and diplomatic clout. With the world's second-largest economy and largest standing army, China's contributions do not match official pronouncements about its growing international role.

    “We are trying to play a bigger role in the existing international order,” Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said at a press conference in March. 

    “The world is so big and faces so many problems; the international community wishes to hear China's voices and see China's solutions, and China cannot be absent,” he told reporters.

    But the figures belie such statements.

    China contributed only $54 million in humanitarian aid in 2014, according to Development Initiatives, which analysed data from sources including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the UN, and the International Monetary Fund. In contrast, the United States contributed $5.9 billion, while Britain gave $2.3 billion, and Saudi Arabia $755 million. 

    The UN’s Financial Tracking Service, which documents global humanitarian aid flows, shows that China’s contribution fell in 2015 to a mere $37 million.

    (The above figures are for humanitarian aid only, and do not include grants and loans aimed at development goals.)

    Even China’s own statistics underscore the relatively low importance it places on foreign aid.

    According to a 2014 white paper on foreign aid – including development as well as humanitarian funding – China’s average ratio of aid budget to gross national income was about 0.07 percent in the period from 2010 to 2012. 

    That's much lower than the average 0.3 percent given annually by the 29 countries making up the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, which include the Group of 7 advanced economies as well as smaller countries including Slovenia, Greece, and the Czech Republic.

    In a recent commentary, the UK-based Overseas Development Institute said: “With greater power comes greater responsibility and China should step up its contributions to international humanitarian assistance to an amount at least remotely worthy of its GDP.”

    The Ministry of Commerce, which administers Beijing’s humanitarian aid, has not responded to IRIN’s requests for comment and further information.

    Politically motivated?

    Observers have also noted that China’s aid often seems motivated at least in part by political goals.

    “In terms of commitments overseas, it seems highly tactical,” said Kerry Brown, professor of Chinese studies and director of the Lau China Institute at King's College, London.

    He cited South Sudan, which gained independence in 2011 from Sudan, a long-time Chinese ally. China suddenly found itself in the awkward position of having invested heavily in oilfields that were now part of an independent South Sudan, while having provided support to the Khartoum government throughout the war, including supplying weapons.

    China sent peacekeepers to join the UN mission in South Sudan, and contributed other humanitarian aid.

    “We also saw this in Costa Rica in 2007 when China agreed to buy $300 million in bonds and give $130 million in aid to secure Costa Rica’s diplomatic recognition of Beijing instead of Taipei,” Brown said.

    Learning curve

    Some experts say it will take time for China to build up its humanitarian activities overseas. But as one of the most natural disaster-stricken countries in the world, China has the potential to contribute its considerable experience to disaster relief. 

    For example, when the worst earthquake in 30 years struck southwestern Sichuan Province in 2008, international agencies played only a small role and China’s response was widely praised. The government immediately launched a massive effort, which included deploying troops to rescue people buried in rubble, deliver aid and organise evacuations.

    But critics also point out that China’s “draconian laws” stymie independent humanitarian efforts from Chinese NGOs.

    SEE: Activist arrest puts foreign NGOs in China on edge

    “China might be a great power now, but it has to learn how to behave like one, especially in the area of humanitarian aid,” said Xu Guoqi, professor of Chinese history and international relations at the University of Hong Kong.

     

     

    Xu said China has very few NGOs relative to its population, and they are still figuring out how to function within China as well as abroad.

    A former Chinese NGO worker, who requested anonymity and whose organisation recently shut down after losing access to international donors, told IRIN: “Many Chinese NGOs have relied on foreign funding, as local philanthropy is still underdeveloped. Now that the government is clamping down harder on civil society, NGOs are thinking about how to survive, not how to expand overseas.”

    Inequality undermines charity

    Despite rapid economic growth, private donations have not yet taken off.

    “Even with so many newly rich people, charity-giving is still not widely spread as in many Western countries,” said Xu.

    On Weibo, a popular Chinese website similar to Twitter, most discussions of China’s humanitarian aid are critical of the leadership for giving money to other countries when commenters felt the funds should be used assisting its own citizens.

    China's income inequality is among the world's worst. The country's Gini coefficient for income was 0.49 in 2012, according to a recent Peking University report, where a number above 0.40 represents severe income inequality.

    “Some members of the public will think, 'there are so many poor areas of China – why should [Chinese] give foreign aid?' But this is changing,” a staff member of the China Foundation for Poverty Alleviation told IRIN. 

    Since 2003, this Beijing-based NGO, which enjoys government support, has carried out disaster relief operations in countries including Indonesia, Haiti, the US, Myanmar, Nepal, and Ecuador with expenditure totaling around $13.7 million.

    The CFPA staffer said the idea of charity could be catching on, judging by recent fundraising efforts.

    “For example, many individuals gave contributions of more than 1,000 yuan ($150) for Nepal earthquake relief, and within 24 hours of fundraising to fight against the Ebola virus we raised 1.21 million yuan ($182,747) from the public,” she said.

    (With additional reporting by Jennifer Rigby in Nepal)

    jc/jf/bp/ag

    Workers and residents watch as a bulldozer demolishes an earthquake-damaged building in the city center in Chautara, Nepal, on 8 July 2015 Analysis Aid and Policy Environment and Disasters Politics and Economics When disaster strikes, should China do more? Joanna Chiu IRIN BEIJING South Sudan Asia China Nepal Costa Rica
              December 2016 Highlights   
    Editor-in-Chief Shawn Kennedy and Clinical Editor Betsy Todd present the highlights of the December issue of the American Journal of Nursing. On this month’s cover, an American NP, Mary Plumb Senkel, volunteers at a rural makeshift clinic near Jacmel, Haiti. Our first CE, “Original Research: Examining the Links Between Lifestyle Factors and Metabolic Syndrome,” discusses a study that examined lifestyle risk factors for metabolic syndrome in people who are overweight or obese, aiming to distinguish those lifestyle factors associated with metabolic health in this population. In our second CE, “Preventing Contrast-Induced Kidney Injury,” the author provides an evidence-based review of screening, risk assessment, and hydration protocols for the clinical management of patients receiving contrast agents for radiographic imaging studies. Our next article, “Supporting Family Caregivers: Administration of Subcutaneous Injections” discusses how nurses can help family caregivers enhance their knowledge, experience, and skill in managing injectable treatments. In “Remembering Pearl Harbor at 75 Years,” the authors tell the stories of five Army and Navy nurses who witnessed the attack, prepared for the casualties, and selflessly cared for the many victims. In addition, there’s News, Reflections, Drug Watch, Art of Nursing, and more.
              May 2014 Highlights   

    Editor-in-chief Shawn Kennedy and Clinical Managing Editor Karen Roush present the highlights of the May issue of the American Journal of Nursing. A nurse practitioner we profile appears on our cover this month with a young Haitian patient. And our first CE article assesses the epidemic in Haiti. Our second CE discusses what nurses should know about intimate partner violence in rural U.S. areas.

    We have the third installment of our systematic reviews series focusing this month on search strategies. Our new Teaching for Practice series delineates the roles of adjunct clinical faculty. We have a critical care analysis article on noise in the ICU and present evidence-based strategies for nurses to decrease noise. And an AJN Reports addresses the rise in heroin use. In addition, there’s News, Reflections, a Viewpoint on power napping in the workplace, Drug Watch, Art of Nursing, and more. Happy Nurses Week!


              April 2010 Highlights   
    Editorial director and interim editor-in-chief Shawn Kennedy and clinical editor Christine Moffa present the highlights of the April issue of the American Journal of Nursing. Of special note: the cover of a Canadian Red Cross nurse treating a Haitian child is part of a special photo essay of coverage of nurses participation in disaster relief following the earthquake in Haiti. There are two CE features including a systematic review on nursing handoffs and the effects of culture on pain, an installment in our series on expanding nursing education capacity funded by the Center to Champion Nursing in America (CCNA) at AARP; plus news, Reflections, Emergency and more. There’s also two podcasts: on with Lee Ann Riesenberg, author of the article on systematic handoffs and the other with Eugenia Miller, a nurse who volunteered in a disaster mission to Haiti.
              Antihaitianismo: Systemic Xenophobia and Racism in the Dominican Republic   
    By Sharri K Hall, Research Associate at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs To download a PDF version of this article, click here.
              Week in pictures: From Venezuela protest to Eid al-Fitr   
    A photo round-up of some of last week's key events, including protests in Venezuela and Haiti and forest fire in Spain.
              IL COMPLEANNO DI MINGUS   

    Ieri Charles Mingus avrebbe compiuto 93 anni. Tra i molti tributi alla sua fondamentale figura ho trovato in rete una piccola, ragionata e condivisibile discografia che in dieci capitoli ne traccia la storia:

    At the Bohemia (Debut, 1956) – Registrato dal vivo in un locale newyorkese, il primo lp 12” (ve n’erano stati in precedenza alcuni formato 10”) da leader di Mingus mette in fila sei brani splendidi (l’edizione attuale aggiunge due alternate takes) che ne dichiarano da subito influenze e poetica, evocando le colonne sonore di Henry Mancini (la felina «Jump Monk», che è pure un omaggio a Thelonious), mediando cool e bebop («Work Song»), jazz e classica («All the Things You C#» cita Rachmaninoff). Il duetto fra la batteria di Max Roach e il contrabbasso suonato da Mingus con l’archetto in «Percussion Discussion» tocca vertici di inenarrabile bellezza.

    Pithecanthropus Erectus (Atlantic, 1956) – Il primo capolavoro prende forma cinque settimane più tardi. Al caos organizzato da cui palingeneticamente nasce un mondo nuovo della title-track, vanno dietro un’originale interpretazione di «A Foggy Day» (George & Ira Gershwin), con tanto di sirene e fischietti che suonano nella nebbia, il sentimentale bozzetto di «Profile of Jackie» e un’altra ambiziosa sinfonia jazz piena di cambi di passo, «Love Chant».

    The Clown (Atlantic, 1957) – Apre «Haitian Fight Song» – swingante, stridula, drammatica; basso qui felpato, là spezzacuore e fiati da marching band – e tanto basterebbe a rendere ineludibile l’acquisto. Ma ci sono anche lo scuro proto-funky di «Blue Cee», il liricissimo omaggio a Charlie Parker di «Reincarnation of a Lovebird» e il racconto incantevolmente felliniano del brano omonimo. È uno degli album più grandi e sottovalutati del Nostro.

    New Tijuana Moods (Bluebird, 1957) – Uno dei lavori mingusiani più accessibili per chi ha poca dimestichezza con il jazz che qui, dopo l’inchino a Gillespie di «Dizzy Moods», si colora di flamenco ed echi gitani («Ysabel’s Table Dance»), diventa giocosa sarabanda («Tijuana Gift Shop»), sipario da corrida («Los Mariachis»), pacata riflessione sul lascito ellingtoniano («Flamingo»). Il cd aggiunge al programma originale versioni differenti di quattro pezzi su cinque.

    Blues & Roots (Atlantic, 1959) – Quando si dice un titolo programmatico! Come sovente accade negli album del nostro uomo, il brano chiave è il primo: «Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting», affresco di funzione liturgica negra con i tromboni che spingono come se stessero correndo verso il regno dei cieli e la voce che grugnisce estatici incitamenti. E da lì in poi è paradiso in terra. Dalle parti di New Orleans («My Jelly Roll Soul»).

    Mingus Ah Um (Columbia, 1959) – Il fratello gemello del predecessore, a partire da una «Better Git Hit in Your Soul» che è per struttura e atmosfere una «Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting Pt. 2». Nove pezzi in scaletta e ognuno di essi è un classico. Cosa scegliere fra la melodia struggente di «Goodbye Pork Pie Hat» e il saltabeccare ilare di «Boogie Stop Shuffle», fra il romanticismo di «Self-Portrait in Three Colors» e l’invettiva politica (pugno di ferro in guanto di velluto) di «Fables of Faubus»? E perché scegliere?

    Mingus Dynasty (Columbia, 1960) – Mingus prende congedo dal suo anno di maggiore grazia con un lavoro che riassume magistralmente le tematiche dei suoi immediati predecessori, sciorinando jazz sudato e poetico, rustico ed elegante insieme, declinando languori amorosi («Diane») che fanno da battistrada a deliziosi quadretti da cartone animato («Song with Orange») e tumulti che gridano che l’America deve cambiare («Gunslinging Bird»). Spettacolare la rilettura del cavallo di battaglia per antonomasia del Duca, «Mood Indigo».

    Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Candid, 1960) – Uno degli organici più agili assemblati dal Nostro – con lui solo Ted Curson (tromba), Eric Dolphy (sassofono) e il fedele Dannie Richmond (batteria) – partorisce uno dei suoi dischi più innovativi, anticipatore di tematiche che saranno più avanti fatte proprie da Ornette Coleman. Spiccano l’iroso blues di «Original Faubus Fables» (l’assassino torna sempre sul luogo del delitto) e il dolente assolo di Mingus in «What Love?».

    The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady (Impulse!, 1963) – Le enciclopedie jazz riferiscono di un album dalla storia tormentata, di nastri smarriti o rovinati, di una seconda facciata assemblata con quanto era rimasto dal produttore Bob Thiele, che per le sue intromissioni venne fatto a posteriori bersaglio di strali velenosi. Eppure il disco è fantastico, giostra spezzacuore di ottoni torridi, chitarre spagnoleggianti (un superbo Jay Berliner), ritmi singultanti, oasi di sogno. «Ethnic folk-dance music» la chiamò Mingus. E aveva ragione.

    Changes One (Atlantic, 1975) – La seconda (terza?) giovinezza del contrabbassista comincia nel ’73 con Mingus Moves, offre un primo album davvero imperdibile l’anno dopo con il live Mingus at Carnegie Hall e tocca lo zenith nel 1975 con i due volumi gemelli di Changes. Validissimo il secondo, è il primo quello imperdibile. Lo dichiarano lo swing scintillante di «Remember Rockefeller at Attica» e gli incantesimi tentatori di «Duke Ellington’s Sound Of Love», la dedica alla moglie di «Sue’s Changes» e l’istrionico quasi-rock di «Devil Blues».

    Fonte: Eddy Cilia 

    http://www.minimaetmoralia.it/wp/charles-mingus/


              Lulu Cerone   
    Q) You were inspired to help others on a global level when devastating earthquakes hit Haiti in 2010. You were only ten-years-old. Most ten-year-olds are concerned about their toys, their shows, etc. How did the earthquakes come to your attention? Did you see it on the news, or did your parents tell you about it? Why did you feel such a desire to help people you didn’t even know?A) My parents didn’t let me watch the news when I was ten years old. But in this digital age, it’s impossible to
              Back to School: What I Learned Teaching Cross-Culturally   
    imageAbstract: The need for nurse educators around the globe is prompting some to do short-term teaching internationally. Prompted by God's call and the great need at the Faculty of Nursing Science of the Episcopal University of Haiti (FSIL), the author taught in Léogâne, Haiti, for 18 days. This article shares practical insights from her experience and important revelations about teaching cross-culturally.
                 
    Vaticano
    Lunedì 30 giugno: la giornata del Papa
    (a cura Redazione "Il sismografo")
    *** Udienze, rinunce e nomine

    *** Udienza di Papa Francesco ai Membri dell’Organizzazione Internazionale Italo-Latino Americana (IILA)
    - "Alcuni Paesi stanno attraversando momenti difficili a livello politico, sociale ed economico. I cittadini che hanno meno risorse sono i primi a notare la corruzione che esiste nei diversi strati sociali e la cattiva distribuzione delle ricchezze." (...) "Il dialogo è indispensabile; ma non il “dialogo tra sordi”"
    Alle ore 12.30 di oggi, nella Sala Clementina del Palazzo Apostolico Vaticano, il Santo Padre Francesco ha ricevuto in Udienza i Membri dell’Organizzazione Italo-Latino Americana, in occasione del 50.mo anniversario di fondazione. L’IILA è un Organismo internazionale creato a Roma nel 1966, i cui Paesi Membri sono Argentina, Bolivia, Brasile, Cile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Italia, Messico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Perù, Repubblica Dominicana, Uruguay e Venezuela.
    Discorso del Santo Padre
    Traduzione in lingua italiana
    Signore e Signori!
    Prima di tutto chiedo scusa per il ritardo. Non era previsto che arrivassi in ritardo, ma si sono allungate le udienze, e perciò vi chiedo scusa.

    Vi do il benvenuto e vi saluto in occasione del 50° anniversario dell’Organizzazione Italo-Latino Americana. Ringrazio il Presidente e il Vicepresidente per le parole con cui hanno introdotto il nostro incontro.
    [Text: Italiano, Español]
     
    Tweet
    - "C’è tanto bisogno di alimentare la speranza cristiana, quella speranza che dona uno sguardo nuovo, capace di scoprire e vedere il bene."

              Why Nikki Haley Is Gloating Over Cuts to Peacekeeping Funding   

    Nikki Haley looks awfully pleased with herself here:

    The ambassador is referring to a deal reached Wednesday, after weeks of negotiation between the U.N. and the Trump administration, to cut the U.N. Peacekeeping budget from $7.87 billion to $7.3 billion for the coming year. U.N. Blue Helmets are currently deployed in 16 operations around the world, though the missions in Haiti and the Ivory Coast are expected to wrap up soon. Under U.S. pressure, the U.N. voted to scale down the peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo in March and is expected to do the same for the program in Sudan’s Darfur region later his week.

    The U.S. provides more than 28 percent of the funding for the program, and the Trump administration had originally sought a $1 billion overall cut to the program and to cap U.S. contributions at 25 percent.

    These may sound like big numbers, but the amount of savings being passed on the U.S. taxpayer here—it will shake out to about $125 million per year assuming the U.S. continues to pick up a quarter of the budget—are minuscule compared with our defense programs. A single B-2 stealth bomber, most of which are currently not operational, cost $2 billion when the Pentagon requisitioned the warplanes in the 1980s.

    And as economist Charles Kenny wrote in January when these cuts were first discussed, peacekeeping is pretty cost-effective, as seen in places from Kosovo to Sierra Leone, to Guatemala. One study found that a deployment of peacekeepers to a country reduces the likelihood of a civil war reigniting there by almost 70 percent. Fewer civil wars around the world means fewer refugees and less ungoverned territory for groups like al-Qaida and ISIS to operate in. Compared with the ongoing U.S. military engagements in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, the peacekeeping program is a bargain.

    To be sure, the U.N.’s program is harder to defend after recent appalling incidents. Nepalese peacekeepers introduced a cholera epidemic to Haiti that has killed more than 10,000 people and continues to sicken Haitians today. There have been hundreds of allegations of sexual abuse by peacekeepers in a number of countries, most notably in Haiti and the Central African Republic. The U.N., under former Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, was shamefully slow to acknowledge responsibility for these problems, and the U.N. still hasn’t done enough to compensate the victims or punish the wrongdoers. More fundamentally, foreign peacekeepers, usually living in fortified compounds and traveling in 4x4s, are often disliked and distrusted in the countries where they are deployed. Haitians disdainfully refer to the local U.N. mission, known by the French acronym MINUSTAH, as “TURISTAH.”

    Haley has raised these issues as part of her overall critique of the peacekeeping program. Given Trump’s general view of the U.N. as a waste of money, it seems likely that the administration would be pushing for these cuts even if every operation were conducted flawlessly and peacekeepers were a paragon of virtue and professionalism. But the U.N. itself deserves some blame for the fact that such a vital program has become such an easy target.


              “L’Imperatore Jones” di Eugene O’Neill   

    Andò in scena per la prima volta nel 1920 a New York. Il dramma si ispira probabilmente al capo della rivolta nera di Haiti, di un secolo prima. Il protagonista porta alla ribellione e alla libertà il suo popolo, rendendolo padrone del suo destino. Ma il potere lo inebria ed egli diventa più tirannico e [...]

    L'articolo “L’Imperatore Jones” di Eugene O’Neill sembra essere il primo su MTP Concessionari Associati.


              Hayti/Haiti/History Walking Tour   
    Sat, July 08, 2017 10:00 AM - Sat, July 08, 2017 11:00 AM None.
              Community Workshop: Hayti/Haiti/History   
    Sat, July 08, 2017 12:00 PM - Sat, July 08, 2017 02:00 PM None.
              RIU HOTELS & RESORTS — UP TO $100 OFF + RESORT COUPONS   
    HAVE IT ALL - Riu Republica, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic

    RIU HOTELS & RESORTS — UP TO $100 OFF + RESORT COUPONS**

    Plan a getaway across the globe with RIU Hotels & Resorts. With all-inclusive, adults-only and family-friendly hotel options in Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America, your vacation will be as unique as you.

    Book your flight and resort getaway now, and save up to $100 per booking:

    • $25 on vacations of $1,000-$2,000
    • $70 on vacations of $2,001-$3,000 
    • $100 on vacations of $3,001 or more

    In addition, take advantage of up to $2,100 in resort coupons at select properties.**

    Traveling with 10 or more people? Delta Vacations offers special rates and services for groups. Contact our Customer Engagement Center or your travel agent for more information.

    Preferred Pick: Gold

    Delta Vacations gives you more ways to rack up miles and earn toward your Medallion® Status. SkyMiles® Members earn 3,000 bonus miles per person, in addition to credited flight miles, with a flight and RIU Hotels & Resorts package.

    **Minimum night stays, select travel dates and other restrictions may apply. See Hotel-Provided Offer Terms and Conditions for details.

    $909*
    per person
    includes flight + 4 nights
    all-inclusive hotel + taxes

    No-Surprise
    Pricing

    Our prices include all flight and hotel taxes
    More ›

    Promo Code: DV31093
    Book By: July 31, 2017
    Travel Between: July 3, 2017 – January 31, 2018
    Price Found:
    June 26, 2017

    Questions? Please call 1-800-800-1504
    or contact your travel agent.

    *Sample Price: This offer is available from hundreds of origin cities, but this price, which reflects the offer, is based on travel between Atlanta and Montego Bay, staying at the Riu Negril in Negril. Price is per person, based on double occupancy and select Monday departures and Friday returns, September 18 – 22, 2017, and is subject to change. Additional restrictions and baggage charges may apply. See Terms and Conditions for details.

    ADD NAME OF LOGO

    Vacations Include:

    • Round-trip air transportation
    • Choice of accommodations
    • Hotel taxes
    • Round-trip transfers between airport and hotel in select destinations
    • Luggage handling at select hotels
    • Assistance of a local representative while in destination
    • 24/7 access to our Destination Help Center

    RIU Hotels & Resorts’ All-Inclusive Vacations Include:

    • All meals, snacks and beverages
    • A wide variety of daily activities
    • Exchange privileges (only at select resorts)
    • Regularly replenished in-room minibar and liquor dispenser
    • Use of in-room safe and complimentary use of beach towels
    • Nightly entertainment
    • Complimentary Wi-Fi in all public areas of the hotel

    Hotel Highlights

    RIU Hotels & Resorts

    With fantastic destinations in Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America, RIU Hotels & Resorts offer an extensive all-inclusive program, complete with lively activities and watersports, spacious accommodations, in-room minibars, delectable dining and an abundance of amenities.

    These resorts cater to friends, couples and families of all ages. Friends and couples can relax on complimentary loungers by the beach or join in poolside games, while kids enjoy RiuLand — an activity and entertainment program for kids 4-12 years old — plus children’s pools at select properties.

    RIU Hotels & Resorts also include exchange privileges at select resorts, allowing you to double the fun.

    Featured Properties:


    Riu Palace Tropical Bay

    Riu Palace Tropical Bay

    A splendid, Victorian-style property, this all-inclusive resort features a spectacular lobby, magnificent gardens, a varied selection of restaurants and lounges, lively entertainment and an array of activities and sports for the active spirit. The complex includes two fresh-water swimming pools, a solaRium terrace, wellness center and a vast beach for relaxing to the sounds of the ocean.




    Riu Republica

    Riu Republica – Adults Only

    Riu Republica is an all-inclusive, adults-only property located on a pristine stretch of white-sand beach, surrounded by inviting Caribbean landscape. This hotel features great amenities, such as two large infinity pools, a gym, a wellness center, daily and nightly entertainment, a variety of gourmet restaurants and a nightclub featuring live music and shows.

     




    Riu Palace St. Martin

    Riu Palace St. Martin

    In the picturesque village of Anse Marcel, all-inclusive Riu Palace St. Martin sits on a secluded cove, leading to a half-moon beach that opens to the sea. Highlights include a variety of daytime and evening activities, the largest pool on the island, onsite marina, close proximity to a nature preserve, Orient Beach and the Village of Grand Case.

     

    All Properties:

    CANCUN, MEXICO
    Riu Cancun
    Riu Caribe
    Riu Palace Las Americas – Adults Only
    Riu Palace Peninsula

    LOS CABOS, MEXICO
    Riu Palace Cabo San Lucas 
    Riu Santa Fe

    MAZATLAN, MEXICO
    Riu Emerald Bay

    RIVIERA MAYA, MEXICO
    Riu Lupita
    Riu Palace Mexico
    Riu Palace Riviera Maya
    Riu Playacar
    Riu Tequila
    Riu Yucatan

    RIVIERA NAYARIT, MEXICO
    Riu Jalisco
    Riu Palace Pacifico
    Riu Vallarta

    PUERTO PLATA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
    Riu Bachata
    Riu Merengue

    PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
    Riu Bambu
    Riu Naiboa
    Riu Palace Bavaro
    Riu Palace Macao – Adults only
    Riu Palace Punta Cana
    Riu Republica – Adults only

    MONTEGO BAY, JAMAICA
    Riu Montego Bay
    Riu Palace Jamaica – Adults only
    Riu Reggae – Adults only

    NEGRIL, JAMAICA
    Riu Negril
    Riu Palace Tropical Bay

    OCHO RIOS, JAMAICA
    Riu Ocho Rios

    NASSAU, BAHAMAS
    Riu Palace Paradise Island

    LIBERIA, COSTA RICA
    Riu Guanacaste
    Riu Palace Costa Rica

    PALM BEACH, ARUBA
    Riu Palace Antillas – Adults Only
    Riu Palace Aruba

    ANSE MARCEL, ST. MARTIN
    Riu Palace St. Martin

    PLAYA BLANCA, PANAMA
    Riu Playa Blanca

     

    Service may be operated by Delta Air Lines®; the Delta Connection® carriers: Compass Airlines, Endeavor Air, Inc., ExpressJet Airlines, Inc., GoJet Airlines, Island Air, Shuttle America and SkyWest and Delta Shuttle® carriers: Shuttle America and Compass Airlines; SkyTeam partners: Aeromexico® or codeshare partners: Aerolíneas Argentinas, Aerolitoral dba Aeromexico Connect, Aeromar, Bahamasair, Gol, SwiftAir, WestJet, and WestJet Encore.

    Pricing Terms and Conditions

    *Price is per person, based on double occupancy at Riu Negril in Negril, between Atlanta and Montego Bay. Monday departures and Friday returns via connecting service on Delta and certain Delta codeshare partners, and is valid for specific travel dates September 18 – 22, 2017. Advance purchase requirements vary. Other travel days and dates and accommodations are available at other prices. May require travel on specific flights or times; blackout dates may apply.

    For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to Mexico City, Guadalajara, Leon, Monterrey (Mexico), Guatemala City, San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, Managua, Panama City (Panama), Santo Domingo, Santiago (Dominican Republic), Port Au Prince, El Salvador (except as otherwise noted in this rule) and for travel between/within Mexico/Central America (excluding US/Canada to/from El Salvador) and the Caribbean, $40 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to El Salvador, $30 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to Bermuda, the Caribbean (except flights to/from Dominican Republic, Guyana and Haiti) and Mexico (excluding Mexico City, Guadalajara, Leon and Monterrey), $25 USD/CAD1 fee for first checked bag (except flights to/from Dominican Republic, Guyana, and Haiti) and $40 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For tickets on or after January 26, 2017 for travel between the U.S., Canada or Mexico and Guatemala City (GUA), Managua (MGA), San Pedro Sula (SAP) and Tegucigalpa (TGU) (except Los Angeles to Guatemala City), 25 USD/CAD1 for the first checked bag and 100 USD, 120 CAD1 or 85 EUR1 fee for second checked bag. For travel between Los Angeles and Guatemala City, no fee for the first checked bag.

    Allowances subject to size/weight limits. Contact a Delta agent or see Excess Baggage for details.
     
    1: CAD or EUR amounts will be charged when exiting Canada or Europe, respectively.

    Price is not retroactive, and is subject to availability. Price does not include any applicable hotel/resort fees or departure taxes collected by hotel/resort/airport at destination. Does not apply to groups of 10 or more people. Must be purchased through Delta Vacations. Standard Terms and Conditions apply, and are provided online during the booking process for consumers or in the ‘Resource Center’ for travel agents; other restrictions may apply. Prices, fees, rules and offers are subject to change without notice. Not responsible for errors or omissions.

    Offer Terms and Conditions

    • Purchase any Delta Vacations flight and RIU Hotels & Resorts package from any Delta Vacations origin in the U.S. or Canada to Mexico, the Caribbean or Central America, June 30 – July 31, 2017, for travel July 3, 2017 – January 31, 2018.
    • At time of reservation, you must refer to promotional code DV31093.
    • Offer is valid on reservations that include a minimum of one flight on Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Airlines, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Air France, Alitalia, Island Air, Bahamasair, Aeromexico, Virgin Australia International, Virgin Atlantic, China Southern, WestJet and/or their codeshare partners; reservations that include only flights on other airlines do not qualify.
    • The hotel discount is based on the standard room charges of each of the participating hotels in Mexico, the Caribbean or Central America.
    • Participating hotels include: Mexico: Cancun — Riu Cancun, Riu Caribe, Riu Palace Las Americas and Riu Palace Peninsula; Los Cabos — Riu Palace Cabo San Lucas and Riu Santa Fe; Mazatlan — Riu Emerald Bay; Riviera Maya — Riu Lupita, Riu Palace Mexico, Riu Palace Riviera Maya, Riu Playacar, Riu Tequila and Riu Yucatan; Riviera Nayarit — Riu Jalisco, Riu Palace Pacifico and Riu Vallarta. Dominican Republic: Puerto Plata — Riu Bachata and Riu Merengue; Punta Cana — Riu Bambu, Riu Naiboa, Riu Palace Bavaro, Riu Palace Macao, Riu Palace Punta Cana and Riu Republica. Jamaica: Montego Bay — Riu Montego Bay, Riu Palace Jamaica and Riu Reggae; Negril — Riu Negril and Riu Palace Tropical Bay; Ocho Rios — Riu Ocho Rios. Bahamas: Nassau — Riu Palace Paradise Island. Costa Rica: Liberia — Riu Guanacaste and Riu Palace Costa Rica. Aruba: Palm Beach — Riu Palace Antillas and Riu Palace Aruba. St. Martin: Anse Marcel — Riu Palace St. Martin. Panama: Playa Blanca — Riu Playa Blanca.
    • Minimum 3-night hotel stay required.
    • Minimum package purchase of $1,000 per booking is required. Package purchase includes flight and hotel; or flight, hotel and car rental, plus any optional activities.
    • Discount is $25 on bookings of $1,000-$2,000; $70 on bookings of $2,001-$3,000; and $100 on bookings of $3,001 or more.
    • Maximum discount is $100 per booking; discount is a percentage of each eligible land component.
    • Additional baggage charges for checked luggage may apply, as well as any applicable hotel/resort fees or departure taxes collected by hotel/resort/airport at destination.
    • Discount is not applicable to airfare; Ski, Dive or Globus family of brands including Globus, Cosmos, Monograms and Avalon packages; for groups of 10 or more and is not retroactive.
    • Must be purchased through Delta Vacations.
    • Discount applies to qualified passengers only. Children staying free in room do not qualify for discount.
    • Discount will recalculate if modifications are made to the booking.
    • No refunds will be issued toward offer. Offer has no cash value. Offer void if qualifying booking is canceled.
    • Programs and availability may vary. Delta Vacations flight reservations may be made up to 331 days in advance of flight departure.
    • Delta Vacations must issue all airline tickets.
    • Standard Terms and Conditions apply and are outlined during the booking process; other restrictions may apply.
    • Delta Vacations is the final authority on the interpretation of these rules and reserves the right to change these Terms and Conditions without prior notice.
    • Delta Vacations is managed, operated and marketed by MLT Vacations.
    • All SkyMiles Program rules apply. To review the rules, please visit delta.com/memberguide. Delta Vacations airfares will earn Medallion Qualification Dollars (MQDs – U.S.-based members only) based on fare class and distance flown. Bonus miles do not count towards Medallion Status or Million Miler™ Status. Offers void where prohibited by law. Offers subject to change without notice. Other restrictions may apply.

    Redemption Instructions
    Promotional code will always be validated and appropriate discount will be deducted if terms and conditions are met.

    • Via the Internet:
      Enter promotional code DV31093 in the Promo Code/eCertificate box on the Booking page.

    • Via Reservations or Travel Agent:
      At time of reservation, you must refer to promotional code DV31093.

    Hotel-Provided Offer Terms and Conditions
    Resort Credits

      • Riu Bachata: 
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $700 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $1,000 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Bambu:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $1,300 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $2,100 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Merengue:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $700 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $1,000 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Montego Bay:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $460 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $590 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Naiboa:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $1,300 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $2,100 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Negril:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $460 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $590 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Ocho Rios:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $460 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $590 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Palace Antillas:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $500 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $600 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Palace Aruba:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $500 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $600 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Palace Bavaro:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $1,300 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $2,100 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Palace Costa Rica:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $900 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 or more nights to receive $1,400 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Palace Jamaica:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $460 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $590 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Palace Macao:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $1,300 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $2,100 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Palace Paradise:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $700 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $900 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Palace Punta Cana:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $1,300 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $2,100 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Palace St. Martin:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $600 in resort coupons.
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $700 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Playa Blanca:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $350 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $450 in resort coupons.
      • Riu Reggae:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $460 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $590 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Republica:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $1,300 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $2,100 in resort coupons. 
      • Riu Palace Tropical Bay:
        • Stay 4-6 nights to receive $460 in resort coupons. 
        • Stay 7 nights or longer to receive $590 in resort coupons.
    • 2,100 in resort coupons include:
      • $180 credit towards Europcar includes one coupon of $30 per day, per room, to be used on economy car rentals.
      • $50 in credits towards The Studio Photography includes 1 coupon for the Sea Package per Service. Sea Package includes 40 minutes with a professional photographer at one location on the hotel property, 25 Photos in a CD, and 1 print photo 16x8.
      • $240 credit in Renova Spa treatments includes two coupons of $35 for Renova Spa massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $25 for hot-stone, cure-stress massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for aromatherapy massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for body wrap, two coupons of $15 for spa pedicure and two coupons of $15 for wash + dry + hair mask.
      • $190 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $50 for PADI open-water diver, two coupons of $15 for sailing lesson and two coupons of $30 for PADI discover scuba diving course.
      • $140 in credits at Diamante Casino includes one coupon of $10 per person, per night. Valid for match play only.
      • $1,140 in credits at Punta Blanca Golf Club includes six coupon of $95 per golf round, per person. Included is round-trip transfer from the hotel to Punta Blanca Golf Club, 18 holes golf round, practice balls, electric golf car, water, soda and cold towel at the end of the tee time.
      • $200 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
    • $1,300 in resort coupons include:
      • $90 credit towards Europcar includes one coupon of $30 per day, per room, to be used on economy car rentals.
      • $50 in credits towards The Studio Photography includes 1 coupon for the Sea Package per Service. Sea Package includes 40 minutes with a professional photographer at one location on the hotel property, 25 Photos in a CD, and 1 print photo 16x8.
      • $240 credit in Renova Spa treatments includes two coupons of $35 for Renova Spa massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $25 for hot-stone, cure-stress massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for aromatherapy massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for body wrap, two coupons of $15 for spa pedicure and two coupons of $15 for wash + dry + hair mask.
      • $190 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $50 for PADI open-water diver, two coupons of $15 for sailing lesson and two coupons of $30 for PADI discover scuba diving course.
      • $80 in credits at Diamante Casino includes one coupon of $10 per person, per night. Valid for match play only.
      • $570 in credits at Punta Blanca Golf Club includes six coupons of $95 per golf round, per person. Included is round-trip transfer from the hotel to Punta Blanca Golf Club, 18 holes golf round, practice balls, electric golf car, water, soda and cold towel at the end of the tee time.
      • $100 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
    • $1,000 in resort coupons include:
      • $240 credit in Renova Spa treatments includes two coupons of $35 for Renova Spa massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $25 for hot-stone, cure-stress massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for aromatherapy massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for body wrap of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for spa pedicure and two coupons for deep cleansing facial of 50 minutes or more.
      • $150 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $60 for PADI open-water diver, two coupons of $10 for PADI discover scuba diving and two coupons of $5 for sail/windsurf lesson.
      • $240 in credits at Playa Dorada Golf Club valid one coupon per person, per golf round. Eight coupons apply. $12 for tee time and $3 for golf car rental. Additional charge applies for government taxes. Caddy is mandatory.
      • $200 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
      • $180 credit toward Europcar includes one coupon of $30 per day, per room, to be used on economy car rentals.
    • $900 in resort coupons include:
      • $220 credit toward Renova Spa Treatments.
      • $210 toward purchases at Scuba Caribe.
      • $80 in credits at the Maunaloa Casino.
      • $300 in credits at the Vista Ridge Golf & Country Club.
      • $100 in credits toward Weddings by Riu.
      • $15 in credits at Thrifty Rent - a – Car.
    • $700 in resort coupons include:
      • $240 credit in Renova Spa treatments includes two coupons of $35 for Renova Spa massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $25 for hot-stone, cure-stress massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for aromatherapy massage of 50 minutes or more, two coupons of $15 for body wrap, two coupons of $15 for spa pedicure and two coupons of $15 for deep-cleansing facial of 50 minutes or more.
      • $150 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $60 for PADI open-water diver, two coupons of $10 for PADI discover scuba diving and two coupons of $5 for sail/windsurf lesson.
      • $120 in credits at Playa Dorada Golf Club valid one coupon per person, per golf round. Eight coupons apply. $12 for tee time and $3 for golf car rental. Additional charge applies for government taxes. Caddy is mandatory.
      • $100 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
      • $90 credit towards Europcar includes one coupon of $30 per day, per room, to be used on economy car rentals.
    • $600 in resort coupons include:
      • $200 credit in Renova Spa Treatments includes two coupons of $30 for Renova combination, two coupons of $25 for special facial treatments of 50 minutes, two coupons of $20 for body wrap, two coupons of $15 for stress-cure massage of 80 minutes and two coupons of $10 for spa pedicure.
      • $180 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $50 for PADI open-water course, two coupons of $20 for Starlite dinner cruise and wet 'n’ wild full-day tour, two coupons of $10 for beach and cave tour and two coupons of $10 for brunch cruise.
      • $20 in credits at Cool Casino includes two coupons of $10 per room, per stay. Valid to play in slot machines and table games.
      • $200 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
    • $590 in resort coupons include:
      • $190 credit at Renova Spa includes two coupons of $35 for Renova Signature treatments, two coupons of $15 for the weekly special, two coupons of $15 for body scrub and massage, two coupons of $15 for aromatherapy massage and two coupons of $15 for deep-tissue massage of 50 minutes.
      • $150 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $60 for PADI open-water dive and two coupons of $15 for PADI discover scuba diving.
      • $200 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied towardsRoyal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
      • $20-$50 credit toward Thrifty Rent a Car: One coupon of $20 for car rentals from 1-3 days and one coupon of $50 for car rentals for 4 days or longer. Coupons are per room, per stay. Limited to one coupon per rental.
    • $500 in resort coupons include:
      • $200 credit in Renova Spa treatments includes two coupons of $30 for Renova combination, two coupons of $25 for special facial treatments of 50 minutes, two coupons of $20 for body wrap, two coupons of $15 for stress-cure massage of 80 minutes and two coupons of $10 for spa pedicure.
      • $180 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $50 for PADI open-water course, two coupons of $20 for Starlite dinner cruise and wet 'n’ wild full-day tour, two coupons of $10 for beach and cave tour and two coupons of $10 for brunch cruise.
      • $20 in credits at Cool Casino includes two coupons of $10 per room, per stay. Valid to play in slot machines and table games.
      • $100 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
    • $460 in resort coupons include:
      • $190 credit at Renova Spa includes two coupons of $35 for Renova Signature treatments, two coupons of $15 for the weekly special, two coupons of $15 for body scrub and massage, two coupons of $15 for aromatherapy massage and two coupons of $15 for deep-tissue massage of 50 minutes.
      • $150 credit toward purchase at Scuba Caribe includes two coupons of $60 for PADI open-water dive and two coupons of $15 for PADI discover scuba diving.
      • $100 credit toward Weddings by RIU applied toward Royal & Caprice Wedding packages. Limited to one coupon per wedding. Applies only for wedding packages paid directly at the hotel. Coupons cannot be used with prepaid weddings.
      • $20-$50 credit toward Thrifty Rent a Car: One coupon of $20 for car rentals from 1-3 days and one coupon of $50 for car rentals for 4 days or longer. Coupons are per room, per stay. Limited to one coupon per rental.
    • $450 in resort coupons include:
      • $40 in credits toward Renova Spa treatments.
      • $180 in credits toward purchases at Scuba Caribe.
      • $200 in credits toward Wedding by RIU, $20 in credits toward Dollar Rent - a - Car.
      • $25 in credits toward Photoshow Panama Photography.
      • $20 in credits toward Gift Shop.
    • $350 in resort coupons include:
      • $40 in credits toward Renova Spa treatments
      • $180 in credits toward purchases at Scuba Caribe.
      • $100 in credits toward Wedding by RIU, $20 in credits toward Dollar Rent - a - Car.
      • $25 in credits toward Photoshow Panama Photography.
      • $20 in credits toward Gift Shop.
    • Guests will receive coupons upon check-in. The total of coupons are per room, per stay, based on double occupancy for guests 21 years and older, and limited to one coupon per service, per person. Resort coupons are non-transferable, non-cumulative, non-refundable, non-combinable, and cannot be used for future stays. Resort coupons can be used as a discount only for selected services. Coupons cannot be exchanged for cash. This promotion is subject to availability and can change without notice.

    MLT31093_DVC


              AMRESORTS COLLECTION — $100 OFF + RESORT COUPONS**   
    NEXT-LEVEL VACATIONS - Secrets Maroma Beach Riviera Cancun

    AMRESORTS COLLECTION — $100 OFF + RESORT COUPONS**

    Discover Next Level Luxury®, an evolution of the all-inclusive experience, only available at Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts and Secrets, Breathless, Dreams, Now and Sunscape Resorts & Spas.

    Save $100 per booking on flight and hotel packages of four nights or longer. Plus, take advantage of up to $400 in resort coupons at select resorts.**

    Preferred Pick: Gold

    Delta Vacations gives you more ways to rack up miles and earn toward your Medallion® Status. SkyMiles® Members earn up to 7,500 bonus miles per person, in addition to credited flight miles, with a flight and Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts, Secrets, Breathless, Dreams, Now or Sunscape Resorts & Spa package.

    Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts are also a part of Delta Vacations Luxury. Upgrade to a luxury vacation package to enjoy flights in first class, VIP transfers and much more.

    **Minimum night stays, select travel dates and other restrictions may apply. See Hotel-Provided Offer Terms and Conditions for details.

    $1,385*
    per person
    iincludes flight + 4 nights all-inclusive hotel + taxes

    No-Surprise
    Pricing

    Our prices include all flight and hotel taxes
    More ›

    Promo Code: DV31096
    Book By: July 31, 2017
    Travel Between: July 1, 2017 – January 31, 2018
    Price Found:
    June 21, 2017

    Questions? Please call 1-800-800-1504
    or contact your travel agent.

    *Sample Price: This offer is available from hundreds of origin cities, but this price, which reflects the offer, is based on travel between Minneapolis/St. Paul and Montego Bay, staying in a Preferred Club Junior Suite Double room at the Secrets St. James Montego Bay. Price is per person, based on double occupancy and select Sunday departures and Thursday returns, October 8 – 12, 2017, and is subject to change. Additional restrictions and baggage charges may apply. See Terms and Conditions for details.

    Amresorts logo

    Vacations Include:

    • Roundtrip air transportation
    • Choice of accommodations
    • Hotel taxes
    • Round-trip transfers between airport and hotel in select destinations
    • Luggage handling at select hotels
    • Maid and/or bellman gratuities
    • Assistance of a local representative while in destination
    • 24/7 access to our Destination Help Center

    The Endless Privileges® Experience at Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts includes:

    • Luxurious, oceanfront suites
    • Concierge and 24-hour front desk services
    • No check-in or check-out time, based on availability
    • Handmade beach bag
    • Daily breakfast, lunch and dinner gourmet dining options, with an assortment of organic food and beverage selections
    • Complimentary cocktails and specialty beverages from a variety of domestic and international top-shelf spirits
    • 24-hour, private, in-suite dining
    • Maid services three times each day
    • Fresh bottle of Champagne and daily basket of fruit
    • Welcome bottle of rum or tequila
    • Complimentary unlimited worldwide calls
    • Complimentary 24-hour laundry service
    • Relaxing 20-minute massage per guest at select resorts
    • Access to sauna, steam room and whirlpool
    • Daily afternoon teatime featuring live-plant tea infusions
    • Fitness center with a full range of equipment
    • Daily exercise and fitness activities

    The Unlimited-Luxury® Experience at Secrets, Breathless, Dreams and Now Resorts & Spas includes:

    • Limitless access to gourmet a la carte dining options
      without reservations required
    • Unlimited international and domestic top-shelf spirits
    • Unlimited natural fruit juices and soft drinks
    • 24-hour room and concierge services
    • Pool and beach wait service
    • Daily refreshed minibar with soft drinks, juice,
      bottled water and beer
    • Daily maid service
    • Endless daytime activities and live nightly entertainment
    • Theme parties, oceanfront bars and entertainment venues
    • No wristbands required
    • All taxes and gratuities
    • Free Wi-Fi and free international calling to the U.S., Canada and local landlines with Unlimited Connectivity, which also allows guests to view the schedules of all events, activities and restaurants at the resort, plus learn about local destinations, excursions and much more at select properties*

    The Unlimited-Fun® Experience at Sunscape Resort & Spas includes:

    • 24-hour access to food and beverage options including
      kid-friendly menu options
    • In-room minibar fully stocked with soft drinks, juice,
      bottled water and beer
    • Buffet and a la carte restaurants without reservations required
    • Bars and lounges serving international and domestic
      brand beverages
    • Unlimited fruit juices, soft drinks and snacks
    • Endless daily land and water activities for all ages
    • Live music and local entertainment
    • Explorer’s Club for kids 3 to 12 years old, with daily supervised activity programs
    • No wristbands required
    • All taxes and gratuities included

    *Available at select properties.

    Hotel Highlights

    Logo

    Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts

    Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts are boutique havens representing the highest level of pampering. Characterized by unequaled romantic and holistic experiences, these resorts combine socially responsible practices, expressive architecture and exceptional service in natural and enriching environments.

    Logo

    Secrets Resorts & Spas

    Secrets Resorts & Spas offer adults an extra measure of romance and sensuality in exquisite, luxurious beachfront settings. Guests immerse themselves in Unlimited-Luxury®, where everything is included.

    Logo

    Breathless Resorts & Spas

    Welcome to the party! Breathless Resorts & Spas offer adults-only, oceanfront vacation experiences in spectacular beachfront settings for the sophisticated and social traveler.

    Logo

    Dreams Resorts & Spas

    Dreams Resorts & Spas offer a high level of luxury for couples and couples with children, in ideal beachfront settings. Spacious rooms and suites, graciously appointed and luxuriously equipped, provide a picture-perfect vacation experience with welcoming service and romantic inclusions.

    Logo

    Now Resorts & Spas

    Now Resorts & Spas offer vibrant beachfront settings in Mexico and the Caribbean, perfect for multigenerational travel, families with teens and tweens, as well as couples and friends. Guests enjoy a family-friendly, modern vacation experience, where play and party are just steps away from peace and quiet.

    Logo

    Sunscape Resorts & Spas

    Sunscape Resorts & Spas offer fun-filled, worry-free, family-friendly vacations without wristbands for families, friends, singles and couples. Guests will experience the convenience of Unlimited-Fun® — where everything is included — paired with a vibrant atmosphere and friendly service.

    Service may be operated by Delta Air Lines®; the Delta Connection® carriers: Compass Airlines, Endeavor Air, Inc., ExpressJet Airlines, Inc., GoJet Airlines, Island Air, Shuttle America and SkyWest and Delta Shuttle® carriers: Shuttle America and Compass Airlines; SkyTeam partners: Aeromexico® or codeshare partners: Aerolíneas Argentinas, Aerolitoral dba Aeromexico Connect, Aeromar, Bahamasair, Gol, SwiftAir, WestJet, and WestJet Encore.

    Pricing Terms and Conditions

    *Price is per person, based on double occupancy in a Preferred Club Junior Suite Double room at Secrets St. James Montego Bay, between Minneapolis/St. Paul and Montego Bay. Sunday departures and Thursday returns via connecting service on Delta and certain Delta codeshare partners, and is valid for specific travel dates October 8 – 12, 2017. Advance purchase requirements vary. Other travel days and dates and accommodations are available at other prices. May require travel on specific flights or times; blackout dates may apply.

    For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to Mexico City, Guadalajara, Leon, Monterrey (Mexico), Guatemala City, San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, Managua, Panama City (Panama), Santo Domingo, Santiago (Dominican Republic), Port Au Prince, El Salvador (except as otherwise noted in this rule) and for travel between/within Mexico/Central America (excluding US/Canada to/from El Salvador) and the Caribbean, $40 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to El Salvador, $30 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to Bermuda, the Caribbean (except flights to/from Dominican Republic, Guyana and Haiti) and Mexico (excluding Mexico City, Guadalajara, Leon and Monterrey), $25 USD/CAD1 fee for first checked bag (except flights to/from Dominican Republic, Guyana, and Haiti) and $40 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For tickets on or after January 26, 2017 for travel between the U.S., Canada or Mexico and Guatemala City (GUA), Managua (MGA), San Pedro Sula (SAP) and Tegucigalpa (TGU) (except Los Angeles to Guatemala City), 25 USD/CAD1 for the first checked bag and 100 USD, 120 CAD1 or 85 EUR1 fee for second checked bag. For travel between Los Angeles and Guatemala City, no fee for the first checked bag.

    Allowances subject to size/weight limits. Contact a Delta agent or see Excess Baggage for details.
     
    1: CAD or EUR amounts will be charged when exiting Canada or Europe, respectively.

    Price is not retroactive, and is subject to availability. Price does not include any applicable hotel/resort fees or departure taxes collected by hotel/resort/airport at destination. Does not apply to groups of 10 or more people. Must be purchased through Delta Vacations. Standard Terms and Conditions apply, and are provided online during the booking process for consumers or in the ‘Resource Center’ for travel agents; other restrictions may apply. Prices, fees, rules and offers are subject to change without notice. Not responsible for errors or omissions.

    Offer Terms and Conditions

    • Purchase any Delta Vacations flight and AMResorts Collection package from any Delta Vacations origin in the U.S. or Canada to Mexico, the Caribbean or Central America, June 29 – July 31, 2017, for travel July 1, 2017 – January 31, 2018.
    • At time of reservation, you must refer to promotional code DV31096.
    • Offer is valid on reservations that include a minimum of one flight on Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Airlines, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Air France, Alitalia, Island Air, Bahamasair, Aeromexico, Virgin Australia International, Virgin Atlantic, China Southern, WestJet and/or their codeshare partners; reservations that include only flights on other airlines do not qualify.
    • The hotel discount is based on the standard room charges of each of the participating hotels in Mexico, the Caribbean or Central America.
    • Participating hotels include: Mexico: Cancun — Zoëtry Villa Rolandi Isla Mujeres Cancun, Secrets Playa Mujeres Golf & Spa Resort, Secrets The Vine Cancun, Dreams Playa Mujeres Golf & Spa Resort and Dreams Sands Cancun Resort & Spa; Cozumel — Secrets Aura Cozumel and Sunscape Sabor Cozumel; Huatulco — Secrets Huatulco Resort & Spa and Dreams Huatulco Resort & Spa; Ixtapa — Sunscape Dorado Pacifico Ixtapa; Los Cabos — Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort, Breathless Cabo San Lucas Resort & Spa and Dreams Los Cabos Suites Golf Resort & Spa; Puerto Vallarta — Secrets Vallarta Bay Puerto Vallarta, Now Amber Puerto Vallarta and Sunscape Puerto Vallarta Resort & Spa; Riviera Maya — Zoëtry Paraiso de la Bonita, Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya, Secrets Capri Riviera Cancun, Secrets Maroma Beach Riviera Cancun, Secrets Silversands Riviera Cancun, Breathless Riviera Cancun, Dreams Puerto Aventuras Resort & Spa, Dreams Riviera Cancun Resort & Spa, Dreams Tulum Resort & Spa, Now Jade Riviera Cancun and Now Sapphire Riviera Cancun; Riviera Nayarit — Dreams Villamagna Nuevo Vallarta. Dominican Republic: La Romana — Dreams Dominicus La Romana and Dreams La Romana Resort & Spa; Puerto Plata — Sunscape Puerto Plata; Punta Cana — Zoëtry Agua Punta Cana, Secrets Cap Cana Resort & Spa, Secrets Royal Beach, Breathless Punta Cana Resort & Spa, Dreams Palm Beach Punta Cana, Dreams Punta Cana Resort & Spa, Now Garden Punta Cana, Now Larimar Punta Cana, Now Onyx Punta Cana, Sunscape Bávaro Beach Punta Cana and Sunscape Dominican Beach Punta Cana. Costa Rica: Liberia — Secrets Papagayo Costa Rica and Dreams Las Mareas Costa Rica. Jamaica: Montego Bay — Zoëtry Montego Bay, Secrets St. James Montego Bay, Secrets Wild Orchid Montego Bay, Breathless Montego Bay Resort & Spa, Sunscape Cove Montego Bay and Sunscape Splash Montego Bay. Panama: Playa Bonita — Dreams Delight Playa Bonita Panama.
    • Minimum 4-night hotel stay required.
    • Discount is $100 on bookings of four nights or longer.
    • Maximum discount is $100 per booking; discount is a percentage of each eligible land component.
    • Additional baggage charges for checked luggage may apply, as well as any applicable hotel/resort fees or departure taxes collected by hotel/resort/airport at destination.
    • Discount is not applicable to airfare; Ski, Dive or Globus family of brands including Globus, Cosmos, Monograms and Avalon packages; for groups of 10 or more and is not retroactive.
    • Must be purchased through Delta Vacations.
    • Discount applies to qualified passengers only. Children staying free in room do not qualify for discount.
    • Discount will recalculate if modifications are made to the booking.
    • No refunds will be issued toward offer. Offer has no cash value. Offer void if qualifying booking is canceled.
    • Programs and availability may vary. Delta Vacations flight reservations may be made up to 331 days in advance of flight departure.
    • Delta Vacations must issue all airline tickets.
    • Standard Terms and Conditions apply and are outlined during the booking process; other restrictions may apply.
    • Delta Vacations is the final authority on the interpretation of these rules and reserves the right to change these Terms and Conditions without prior notice.
    • Delta Vacations is managed, operated and marketed by MLT Vacations.
    • All SkyMiles Program rules apply. To review the rules, please visit delta.com/memberguide.
    • Delta Vacations airfares will earn Medallion Qualification Dollars (MQDs – U.S.-based members only) based on fare class and distance flown. Bonus miles do not count towards Medallion Status or Million Miler™ Status. Offers void where prohibited by law. Offers subject to change without notice. Other restrictions may apply.
    • TA: -2% points.

    Redemption Instructions
    Promotional code will always be validated and appropriate discount will be deducted if terms and conditions are met.

    • Via the Internet:
      Enter promotional code DV31096 in the Promo Code/eCertificate box on the Booking page.

    • Via Reservations or Travel Agent:
      At time of reservation, you must refer to promotional code DV31096.

    Hotel-Provided Offer Terms and Conditions

    Resort Coupons

      • Receive either $200 or $400 in resort coupons based on the room category booked.
      • Run of House room types do not receive any amount of resort coupons.
      • $400 in resort coupons broken down as follows: $200 toward spa services (four coupons of $40 and two of $20); $120 toward a romantic dinner (two coupons of $40 and two of $20); $80 toward bottles of wine at any of the restaurants (eight coupons of $10). Inclusions are subject to change without notice, and coupons have no cash value. Restrictions may apply.
      • $200 in resort coupons broken down as follows: $100 toward spa services (two coupons of $40 and one coupon of $20); $60 toward romantic dining (one $40 coupon and one $20 coupon may be combined); $40 toward bottles of wine at any of the restaurants (four coupons of $10). Only one coupon can be redeemed per spa treatment. Coupons of $10 cannot be combined. Therefore one $10 coupon can be applied toward one bottle of wine.
      • Resort coupons cannot be applied toward the following items: beauty salon services, spa product purchases, telephone charges, dolphin experiences, gift shop purchases, boutique purchases, Internet service, marina services, dive shop, medical services, car rentals and travel agency services. Resort coupons must be redeemed at the time of reservation or service. Resort coupons do not hold any cash or commercial value, are not refundable and nontransferable. They are not applicable for tips, taxes, private functions and/or special events, such as Christmas and New Year's Gala dinners. Resort coupons are not accumulative, and cannot be combined with any other promotion or special offer including, but not limited to, spa treatment discounts. They are only valid during the original stay, and cannot be deducted upon check-out. This entire offer is based on availability, and can be modified or closed out at any time prior to booking.
      • Zoëtry Wellness & Spa Resorts:

          • Zoëtry Agua Punta Cana: $400 in resorts coupons: Ocean Front Junior Suite Deluxe. $200 in resort coupons: all other room categories.
          • Zoëtry Paraiso de la Bonita: $400 in resorts coupons: Two Bedroom Ocean Front Master Suite with Terrace, Romance Ocean Front Lover Suite and Two Bedroom Ocean Front Master Suite with Plunge Pool. $200 in resort coupons: all other room categories.
          • Zoëtry Villa Rolandi Isla Mujeres Cancun: $400 in resort credits: Junior Suite Superior Oceanfront. $200 in resort credits: all other room categories.

        Secrets Resorts & Spas:

          • Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya: $400 in resort coupons: Master or Preferred Club room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Aura Cozumel: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Capri Riviera Cancun: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Ocean View room category and higher. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Maroma Beach Riviera Cancun: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Papagayo Costa Rica: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Bungalow Suite Ocean Front View or Preferred Club Bungalow Suite Ocean View room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Playa Mujeres Golf & Spa Resort: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Puerto Los Cabos Golf & Spa Resort: $400 in resort coupons in Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean Front, Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View or Preferred Club Junior Suite Swim-Out Ocean View room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Royal Beach: $400 in resort coupons in Preferred Club Junior Suite Tropical View, Preferred Club Junior Suite Pool View, Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View or Preferred Club Master Suite Ocean Front room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets St. James Montego Bay: $400 in resort coupons in the Preferred Club Junior Suite room category. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Silversands Riviera Cancun: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets The Vine Cancun: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View or higher room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Vallarta Bay Puerto Vallarta: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Garden View, Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View, Preferred Club Junior Suite Swim-Out, Preferred Club Master Suite Ocean Front, Preferred Club Master Suite Swim-Out Garden View or Preferred Club Master Suite Swim-Out Ocean Front room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Wild Orchid Montego Bay: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Secrets Huatulco Resort & Spa: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean Front, Preferred Club Junior Suite Swim Out and Preferred One Bedroom Swim-Out categories. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.

        Breathless Resorts & Spas:

          • Breathless Cabo San Lucas Resort & Spa: $400 in resort coupons: xhale Club Master One Bedroom Suite, xhale Club Master Suite Marina View, xhale Club Romance Suite Marina View or xhale Club Suite Marina View room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Breathless Montego Bay Resort & Spa: $400 in resort coupons: xhale Club Junior Suite Swim-Up, xhale Club Master Suite King Ocean View, xhale Club Master Suite King Swim-Up Garden View, xhale Club Ocean View or xhale Club Presidential Suite King Ocean View room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Breathless Punta Cana Resort & Spa: $400 in resort coupons: xhale Club Junior Suite Partial Ocean View, xhale Club Junior Suite Pool View, xhale Club Junior Suite Swim-Up or xhale Club Master Suite Ocean Front View room categories. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.

        Dreams Resorts & Spas:

          • Dreams Huatulco Resort & Spa: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Ocean Front Double, Preferred Club Deluxe Ocean Front King, Preferred Club Junior Suite with Jacuzzi Double and Preferred Club Junior Suite Jacuzzi King. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Las Mareas Costa Rica: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Tropical View, Preferred Club Junior Suite Oceanview and Preferred Club Junior Suite Swim-out Tropical View. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams La Romana Resort & Spa: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Garden View, Preferred Club Partial Ocean View, Preferred Club Honeymoon Suite Garden View and Preferred Club Honeymoon Suite Ocean Front. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Dominicus La Romana: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Tropical View, Preferred Club Deluxe Swim Up, Preferred Club Suite Tropical View, Preferred Club Swim Up Suite Tropical View, Preferred Club Spa Suite Partial Ocean View, Preferred Club Master Suite Ocean View Preferred Club Master Suite Swim Up Tropical View, Preferred Club Governor Tropical View, Preferred Club Governor Ocean View, Preferred Club Presidential Ocean View, Two Bedroom Family Suite Tropical View and Three Bedroom Family Suite Tropical View. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Los Cabos Suites Golf Resort & Spa: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View, Preferred Club Luxury One Bedroom, Preferred Club One Bedroom Suite Ocean View, Preferred Club Family Master Two Bedroom Suite Ocean Front and Preferred Club Presidential Suite Two Bedroom Ocean Front. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Palm Beach Punta Cana: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Tropical View, Preferred Club Deluxe Ocean View, Preferred Club Deluxe Jacuzzi Tropical View, Preferred Club Deluxe Jacuzzi Ocean View, Preferred Club Honeymoon Suite Jacuzzi Tropical View and Preferred Club Honeymoon Suite Jacuzzi Ocean View. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Puerto Aventuras Resort & Spa: $400 resort coupons: Honeymoon Jacuzzi Ocean View, Preferred Club Marina View Double, Preferred Club Marina View King, Preferred Club Ocean View Double, Preferred Club Ocean View King, Preferred Club Family Suite Ocean View, Preferred Club Master Suite, Honeymoon Jacuzzi Dolphin View King, Preferred Dolphin View King and Preferred Dolphin View Double. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Punta Cana Resort & Spa: $400 in resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Tropical View, Preferred Club Deluxe Tropical View Family Room, Preferred Club Junior Suite and Preferred Club Honeymoon Suite. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Riviera Cancun Resort & Spa: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Ocean View King, Preferred Club Ocean View Double, Preferred Club Ocean View Pool Front King, Preferred Club Ocean View Pool Front Double, Preferred Club with Plunge Pool King, Preferred Club with Plunge Pool Double, Preferred Club Oceanfront Honeymoon Suite and Preferred Club Oceanfront Master Suite. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Tulum Resort & Spa: $400 resort coupons: Deluxe Ocean View room and higher. $200 in resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Villamagna Nuevo Vallarta: $400 resort coupons: Junior Suite Preferred Club Ocean View. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Dreams Delight Playa Bonita Panama: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Ocean View and higher. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.

        Now Resorts & Spas:

          • Now Amber Puerto Vallarta: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Garden View (King), Preferred Club Junior Suite Garden View (Double), Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View (King), Preferred Club Junior Suite Ocean View (Double), Preferred Club Junior Suite Swim-Out (King), Preferred Club Junior Suite Swim-Out (Double), Preferred Club Master Suite Swim-Out Garden View, Preferred Club Master Suite Ocean Front and Preferred Club Master Suite Swim-Out Ocean Front. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Now Jade Riviera Cancun: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Suite Ocean View (Double), Preferred Club Suite Ocean View (King), Preferred Club Suite Oceanfront (King), Preferred Club Suite Oceanfront (Double) and Preferred Club Governor Suite Oceanfront. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Now Larimar Punta Cana: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Deluxe Tropical View (King), Preferred Club Deluxe Tropical View (Double), Preferred Club Deluxe Pool View (King), Preferred Club Deluxe Pool View (Double), Preferred Club Deluxe Partial Ocean View (King), Preferred Club Deluxe Partial Ocean View (Double) and Preferred Club Master Suite Ocean Front View (King). $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Now Sapphire Riviera Cancun: $400 resort coupons: Preferred Club Junior Suite Tropical View (Double), Preferred Club Junior Suite Tropical View (King), Preferred Club Junior Suite Oceanfront (King), Preferred Club Junior Suite Oceanfront (Double), Preferred Club Beachfront (King), Preferred Club Beach Front (Double) and Preferred Club Governor Suite. $200 resort coupons: All other room categories.
          • Now Garden Punta Cana: $200 resort coupons: All room categories.

        Sunscape Resorts & Spas:

          • Sunscape Dorado Pacifico Ixtapa: $400 resort coupons:Sun Club Deluxe Ocean View, Sun Club Family Suite Ocean Front, Sun Club Family Connecting and Sun Club Honeymoon Suite. $200 resort coupons: Deluxe Partial Ocean View, Deluxe Ocean View and Family Connecting Room.
          • Sunscape Puerto Vallarta Resort & Spa: $400 resort coupons: Sun Club Deluxe Ocean View and Sun Club Romantic Suite Ocean Front. $200 resort coupons: Deluxe Ocean View, Deluxe Family Suite Tropical, Deluxe Family Suite Bay View, Deluxe Family Suite Ocean View and Honeymoon Bay View Suite.
          • Sunscape Sabor Cozumel: $200 in resort coupons based on the room category booked.

    MLT31096


              IBEROSTAR HOTELS & RESORTS — SAVE UP TO $200 + MORE   
    CHILL OUT IN THE WARM SUN. - IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Bavaro, Grand Collection

    IBEROSTAR HOTELS & RESORTS — SAVE UP TO $200 + MORE

    Set in stunning beachside destinations in Mexico, the
    Dominican Republic and Jamaica, all-inclusive IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resorts are perfect havens for adults-only, wellness or adventurous getaways.

    Save up to $200 per booking on a flight and 3-night or longer IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resorts vacation:

    • $50 on vacations of $1,400-$3,499
    • $125 on vacations of $3,500-$5,999  
    • $200 on vacations of $6,000 or more

    In addition, take advantage of kids stay and eat free offers.** And, at select properties, experience Exclusive All-Inclusive
    PLUS amenities like unlimited a la carte dining and upgraded
    in-room amenities.

    Preferred Pick: Gold

    Delta Vacations gives you more ways to rack up miles and earn toward your Medallion® Status. SkyMiles® Members earn 3,000 bonus miles per person, in addition to credited flight miles, with a flight and hotel vacation.

    **Minimum night stays, select travel dates and other restrictions may apply. See Hotel-Provided Offer Terms and Conditions for details.

    $759*
    per person
    includes flight + 3 nights
    all-inclusive hotel + taxes

    No-Surprise
    Pricing

    Our prices include all flight and hotel taxes
    More ›

    Promo Code: DV31100
    Book By: July 31, 2017
    Travel Between: July 1, 2017 – January 31, 2018
    Price Found:
    June 30, 2017

    Questions? Please call 1-800-800-1504
    or contact your travel agent.

    *Sample Price: This offer is available from hundreds of origin cities, but this price, which reflects the offer, is based on travel between Atlanta and Punta Cana, staying at the IBEROSTAR Bavaro, Premium Gold. Price is per person, based on double occupancy and select Tuesday departures and Friday returns, October 3 – 6, 2017, and is subject to change. Additional restrictions and baggage charges may apply. See Terms and Conditions for details.

    IBEROSTAR LOGO

    Vacations Include:

    • Round-trip air transportation
    • Choice of accommodations
    • Hotel taxes
    • Round-trip transfers between airport and hotel
    • Luggage handling at select hotels
    • Assistance of a local representative while in destination
    • 24/7 access to our Destination Help Center

    IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resorts' All-Inclusive Vacations Also Include:

    • All meals, snacks and beverages
    • A wide variety of daily activities including non-motorized watersports
    • Nightly entertainment

    Exclusive All-Inclusive PLUS

    In addition to the all-inclusive deals and standard amenities the hotels already offer, stay at specific resorts (see list below) to receive exclusive amenities that add an exceptional level of service and pampering:

    • Express check-in and check-out
    • Unlimited a la carte dining
    • Daily stocked minibar
    • Upgraded in-room amenities
    • Special welcome letter and gift

    This program — exclusive to Delta Vacations — offers special amenities that are provided at no additional cost with your vacation package, when you stay at IBEROSTAR Cancun, Premium Gold; IBEROSTAR Paraiso Maya, Premium Gold; IBEROSTAR Playa Mita, Premium Gold; and IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Suites, Premium Gold.

    Hotel Highlights

    IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resorts

    Enjoy one-of-a-kind, spectacular service in the stunning surroundings of IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resorts, which offer three types of resorts: Premium — all-inclusive indulgence for all ages; Premium Gold — upscale family destinations; and The Grand Collection — adults-only luxury without limits.

    Choose from any of these spectacular properties:

    Mexico
    Cancun
    IBEROSTAR Cancun, Premium Gold

    Cozumel
    IBEROSTAR Cozumel, Premium

    Riviera Maya
    IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Paraíso, Grand Collection - Adults Only
    IBEROSTAR Paraíso Beach, Premium
    IBEROSTAR Paraíso Lindo, Premium Gold
    IBEROSTAR Paraíso Maya, Premium Gold
    IBEROSTAR Quetzal, Premium

    Riviera Nayarit
    IBEROSTAR Playa Mita, Premium Gold

    Jamaica
    Montego Bay

    IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Rose Hall, Grand Collection - Adults Only
    IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Beach, Premium
    IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Suites, Premium Gold

    Dominican Republic
    La Romana

    IBEROSTAR Hacienda Dominicus, Premium

    Puerto Plata
    IBEROSTAR Costa Dorada, Premium

    Punta Cana
    IBEROSTAR Bávaro Suites, Premium Gold
    IBEROSTAR Dominicana, Premium
    IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Bávaro, Grand Collection - Adults Only
    IBEROSTAR Punta Cana, Premium

    Service may be operated by Delta Air Lines®; the Delta Connection® carriers: Compass Airlines, Endeavor Air, Inc., ExpressJet Airlines, Inc., GoJet Airlines, Island Air, Shuttle America and SkyWest and Delta Shuttle® carriers: Shuttle America and Compass Airlines; SkyTeam partners: Aeromexico® or codeshare partners: Aerolíneas Argentinas, Aerolitoral dba Aeromexico Connect, Aeromar, Bahamasair, Gol, SwiftAir, WestJet, and WestJet Encore.

    Pricing Terms and Conditions

    *Price is per person, based on double occupancy at IBEROSTAR Bavaro, Premium Gold, between Atlanta and Punta Cana. Tuesday departures and Friday returns via nonstop service on Delta and certain Delta codeshare partners, and is valid for specific travel dates October 3 – 6, 2017. Advance purchase requirements vary. Other travel days and dates and accommodations are available at other prices. May require travel on specific flights or times; blackout dates may apply.

    For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to Mexico City, Guadalajara, Leon, Monterrey (Mexico), Guatemala City, San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, Managua, Panama City (Panama), Santo Domingo, Santiago (Dominican Republic), Port Au Prince, El Salvador (except as otherwise noted in this rule) and for travel between/within Mexico/Central America (excluding US/Canada to/from El Salvador) and the Caribbean, $40 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to El Salvador, $30 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For travel from the United States/Canada/Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands to Bermuda, the Caribbean (except flights to/from Dominican Republic, Guyana and Haiti) and Mexico (excluding Mexico City, Guadalajara, Leon and Monterrey), $25 USD/CAD1 fee for first checked bag (except flights to/from Dominican Republic, Guyana, and Haiti) and $40 USD/CAD1 fee for second checked bag. For tickets on or after January 26, 2017 for travel between the U.S., Canada or Mexico and Guatemala City (GUA), Managua (MGA), San Pedro Sula (SAP) and Tegucigalpa (TGU) (except Los Angeles to Guatemala City), 25 USD/CAD1 for the first checked bag and 100 USD, 120 CAD1 or 85 EUR1 fee for second checked bag. For travel between Los Angeles and Guatemala City, no fee for the first checked bag.

    Allowances subject to size/weight limits. Contact a Delta agent or see Excess Baggage for details.

    1: CAD or EUR amounts will be charged when exiting Canada or Europe, respectively.

    Price is not retroactive, and is subject to availability. Price does not include any applicable hotel/resort fees or departure taxes collected by hotel/resort/airport at destination. Does not apply to groups of 10 or more people. Must be purchased through Delta Vacations. Standard Terms and Conditions apply, and are provided online during the booking process for consumers or in the ‘Resource Center’ for travel agents; other restrictions may apply. Prices, fees, rules and offers are subject to change without notice. Not responsible for errors or omissions.

    Offer Terms and Conditions

    • Purchase any Delta Vacations flight and IBEROSTAR Hotels & Resort package from any Delta Vacations origin in the U.S. or Canada to Mexico, the Dominican Republic or Jamaica, June 29 – July  31, 2017, for travel July 1, 2017 – January 31, 2018.
    • At time of reservation, you must refer to promotional code DV31100.
    • Offer is valid on reservations that include a minimum of one flight on Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Airlines, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Air France, Alitalia, Island Air, Bahamasair, Aeromexico, Virgin Australia International, Virgin Atlantic, China Southern, WestJet and/or their codeshare partners; reservations that include only flights on other airlines do not qualify.
    • The hotel discount is based on the standard room charges of each of the participating hotels in Mexico, the Dominican Republic or Jamaica.
    • Participating hotels include: Mexico: Cancun — IBEROSTAR Cancun, Premium Gold. Cozumel — IBEROSTAR Cozumel, Premium. Riviera Maya — IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Paraíso, Grand Collection – Adults Only; IBEROSTAR Paraíso Beach, Premium; IBEROSTAR Paraíso Lindo, Premium Gold; IBEROSTAR Paraíso Maya, Premium Gold; and IBEROSTAR Quetzal, Premium. Riviera Nayarit — IBEROSTAR Playa Mita, Premium Gold. Jamaica: Montego Bay — IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Rose Hall, Grand Collection – Adults Only; IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Beach, Premium; and IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Suites, Premium Gold. Dominican Republic: La Romana — IBEROSTAR Hacienda Dominicus, Premium. Puerto Plata — IBEROSTAR Costa Dorada, Premium. Punta Cana — IBEROSTAR Bávaro Suites, Premium Gold; IBEROSTAR Dominicana, Premium; IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Bávaro, Grand Collection- Adults Only; and IBEROSTAR Punta Cana, Premium.
    • Minimum 3-night hotel stay required.
    • Minimum package purchase of $1,400 per booking is required. Package purchase includes flight and hotel; or flight, hotel and car rental, plus any
      optional activities.
    • Discount is $50 on bookings of $1,400-$3,499; $125 on bookings of $3,500-$5,999; and $200 on bookings of $6,000 or more.
    • Maximum discount is $200 per booking; discount is a percentage of each eligible land component.
    • Additional baggage charges for checked luggage may apply, as well as any applicable hotel/resort fees or departure taxes collected by hotel/resort/airport
      at destination.
    • Discount is not applicable to airfare; Ski, Dive or Globus family of brands including Globus, Cosmos, Monograms and Avalon packages; for groups of 10 or more and is not retroactive.
    • Must be purchased through Delta Vacations.
    • Discount applies to qualified passengers only. Children staying free in room do not qualify for discount.
    • Discount will recalculate if modifications are made to the booking.
    • No refunds will be issued toward offer. Offer has no cash value. Offer void if qualifying booking is canceled.
    • Programs and availability may vary. Delta Vacations flight reservations may be made up to 331 days in advance of flight departure.
    • Delta Vacations must issue all airline tickets.
    • Standard Terms and Conditions apply and are outlined during the booking process; other restrictions may apply.
    • Delta Vacations is the final authority on the interpretation of these rules and reserves the right to change these Terms and Conditions without prior notice.
    • Delta Vacations is managed, operated and marketed by MLT Vacations.
    • All SkyMiles Program rules apply. To review the rules, please visit delta.com/memberguide. Delta Vacations airfares will earn Medallion Qualification Dollars (MQDs – U.S.-based members only) based on fare class and distance flown. Bonus miles do not count toward Medallion Status or Million Miler™ Status. Offers void where prohibited by law. Offers subject to change without notice. Other restrictions may apply.
    • TA: -2% points.

    Redemption Instructions
    Promotional code will always be validated and appropriate discount will be deducted if terms and conditions are met.

    • Via the Internet:
      Enter promotional code DV31100 in the Promo Code/eCertificate box on the Booking page.

    • Via Reservations or Travel Agent:
      At time of reservation, you must refer to promotional code DV31100.

    Hotel-Provided Offer Terms and Conditions

    Kids Stay and Eat Free

    IBEROSTAR Cancun, Premium Gold: One child, 12 years old or younger, stays and eats free when sharing a room with two paying adults.

    • Book and travel by October 31, 2017.

    IBEROSTAR Cozumel, Premium: Up to two kids, 12 years old and younger, stay and eat free when sharing a room with two adults.

    • In the Family Room category, two children stay and eat free when sharing a room with four paying adults. If the 4-adult minimum is not met, children will be charged as full-paying adults.
    • Book and travel by October 31, 2017.

    IBEROSTAR Paraiso Beach, Premium; IBEROSTAR Paraiso Lindo, Premium Gold; IBEROSTAR Quetzal, Premium: Kids stay and eat free.

    • One child, 12 years old or younger, stays and eats free when sharing a room with two paying adults.
      • Book and travel by October 31, 2017.
    • For the Family Room category, one child stays and eats free when sharing a room with four paying adults. If the 4-adult minimum is not met, children will be charged as full-paying adults.
      • Book and travel by October 31, 2017.

    IBEROSTAR Paraiso Maya, Premium Gold: One child, 12 years old or younger, stays and eat free when sharing a room with two paying adults.

    • Book and travel by October 31, 2017.

    IBEROSTAR Playa Mita, Premium Gold: One child, 12 years old or younger, stays and eats free when sharing a room with two paying adults.

    • Book and travel by October 31, 2017.

    MLT31100


              Frank Mayson - Phonies Feat. Wes Green [Unsigned Artist]   
    Haitian-American artist Frank Mayson releases official music video for his single Phonies featuring Wes Green. Phonies is a lead single from his upcoming debut project, Trap Standard. Instagram: http: ... - Source: www.worldstarhiphop.com
              "Tonight's Word: Dog Shaming" - Heisenberg - 6.30.17   
    Entry Submitted by Heisenberg at 7:02 PM EDT on June 30, 2017



    Ain't that a shame?
    my tears fell like rain.
    Ain't that a shame?
    you're the one to blame
    Oh well, goodbye
    although I'll cry.
    Ain't that a shame...? - Fats Domino

    No time left now for shame
    Horizon behind me, no more pain
    Windswept stars blink and smile
    Another song, another mile - Black Crowes


    SHAME..SHAME..SHAME - Game Of Thrones

    And that brings us to tonight's word: DOG SHAMING

    Dogs do the strangest things. And thank God we now have the internet to share the hijinx. And their shame. Look at that face. She's so sorry. Please forgive her. She thanks you. She loves you.



    I guess a healthy dose of shame is not a bad thing every now and then. Especially when one starts to think they're hot shit. Or that their poop doesn't stink. Let's take em down just a notch. They're flying a little to high. And I guess now that we're walking across home plate off the grand slam bat of our clean up slugger, it's tempting to do a little dance over home plate. Tempting to forget about all the hard work and sacrifice that got us to this walk off grand slam. Tempting to forget all the rat bastard shenanigans. Tempting to forget we let it happen on our watch. So maybe a little shame reminder is good for the soul. You know what you did.



    There are two Americas. The first America we all know and love. The land of hope and dreams. The land of milk and honey (just don't tell the Mexicans and the Haitians that). The land of the Grand Canyon and the natural disaster responders around the world. It's the America we all pray that we are. It's a place where we can get a job, raise a family and someday retire. Work 5 days a week, bbq with friends and family on the weekends, maybe go to the lake. Conscience clean, soul satisfied, ready to meet our makers.

    And then there's AmeriKa with a K. The AmeriKa that creates wars in the world. That destabilizes countries. The grows and floods drugs all over the world. That hypnotizes its people. That assasinates leaders. That puts thugs into the seats of power. That has the cops collecting for the cons. You know the ones.

    The definition of Amerika is an alternative spelling for the name America (referring specifically to the United States of America) intending to portray the country as fascist and oppressive and culturally inferior. - Yourdictionary.com

    I guess pretty soon we'll all be walking around with black cards and $100 haircuts. Maybe racing in the streets in that Maserati. Here comes the ugly American. And I'll probably be one of them. Ever been to Europe? When I went to London, someone told me that the older generation loves the Americans. They love us because the US soldiers helped defeat Hitler in World War II. It was true. A little old lady walked 3 blocks out of here way to show us the restaurant we were looking for. It was something I'll never forget. Now would a New Yorker do that? I keed. I keed. Not funny, bro.



    But guess what? That generation is dying off and the younger generations have no love for AmeriKa. Or America. All they see is sanctions and misery and puppet regimes carrying out AmeriKa's warped world order. So here come the chosen ones touching down in third world fresh from Nordstroms. Got the new watch..got the new duds...obviously doing well for ourselves (with a little help). Speaking english like only Americans do. Just a little heads up, be prepared to answer for your country's actions. Cause they do things differently there. They'll call you out and see if you stand behind your countries ideals. It's not the isolationism like it is here. And from the conversations here, there are some here that will stand behind their country's actions come hell or high water (although be it from the safety of their own home). Anonymous. But it's going to be a different story when you're face-to-face with another human asking you where you stand. Maybe at a restaurant, or a pub, or a concert or at the world cup. What say you? Shame?



    Will you walk away? Will you say, "Oh no, I didn't vote for him. I'm innocent. It wasn't me, Pierre."? Will you say, "Screw you. Who the hell are you to tell me about my country?"? Or will you say "I had no idea what was going on. I was just trying to survive paycheck to paycheck."? Or will you say " I'm sorry. I know my country f****ed up. And I did nothing. I turned a blind eye to what my country was doing to the world. I didn't protest in the least." Pono.

    Ever see band of Brothers? There's a part where the US soldiers find the concentration camps. General Walker called the local town folk to come up and make them see for themselves the corpses and survivors. One US soldier says "You must've known!! You can smell the stench! Don't tell me you didn't know." So...just be prepared when European millennials step up to you in the street and call you out. Unless you never want to leave the US then you'll be fine. Shame.

    https://youtu.be/a34aYsSnrYg



    Over a year ago, I was really drawn to what was being taught here. Kinda lost interest in religion and politics over the years...something just Pope Francis just creeped me out. Those red shoes, gross. So all this tin foil hat stuff was just fascinating. I entered with an open-mind and an objective heart as I started to wander around Zimland. It wasn't easy to swallow those jagged little pills. And the grapes?...sour. Some things went down easy. Others, had to get my Heimlich on. So here's the hard questions: Did I care to know how bad it was? Did I use the great excuse of "I'm just trying to get by, man"? Did I turn a blind eye? Could I have put up a better fight for my Mexican, Vietnamese, Filipino brothers and sisters? Questions I asked myself over year ago when Yosef first hit the scene. And perhaps it's a great reminder now for the vets or a great first lesson for all the new human cannonball Zim owners. Maybe...try not to act like you're all that. Try not to act like you're Gods gift to humanity. That would be the ZIM, remember? The ZIM is God's gift to humanity. Might not be so easy, though, with that shiny new passport, new digs, arm candy and all. Tough lessons. Running out of time. I think the word I'm looking for is "humility".



    My family, if you're like me and you been around the block more than a couple times, this is the part of the movie where the slave reaches his hand up and catches that stick mid swing going straight for his head. He stands up, takes that stick in his hands and cracks it in two over his knee and says "No more." I love that part. However, we know we drove America into a ditch. What happened was wrong, but we're here to fix it. Invasion of our planet by pirates was wrong, but we're here to fix it. I'm not too proud to apologize for being asleep at the wheel, but we're here to fix it."

    As for that poor pug that knows he did his business all over your Persian rug, let's give him a pass. I think he's learned his lesson. Besides, we don't want to dog shame him into a complex do we?



    And that's the word

    Heisenberg

    https://youtu.be/_8CFeNxLXCo

    https://youtu.be/Rr8ljRgcJNM

    https://youtu.be/hmr3YjcM0AI

    https://youtu.be/6pex_ASYQPM

    https://youtu.be/PhBrTry-FrA











    "Wiser Time"

    No time left now for shame
    Horizon behind me, no more pain
    Windswept stars blink and smile
    Another song, another mile

    You read the line every time
    Ask me about crime in my mind
    Ask me why another road song
    Funny but I bet you never left home

    On a good day, it's not every day
    We can part the sea
    And on a bad day, it's not every day
    Glory beyond our reach

    Fourteen seconds till' sunrise
    Tired but wiser for the time
    Lightning 30 miles away
    Three thousand more in two days

    On a good day, it's not every day
    We can part the sea
    And on a bad day, it's not every day
    Glory beyond our reach

              re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean   
    Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
              Why Are Some Countries Rich And Others Poor?   
    Why are some nations rich and others poor? In a new book called Why Nations Fail , a pair of economists argue that a lot comes down to politics. To research the book, the authors scoured the world for populations and geographic areas that are identical in all respects save one: they're on different sides of a border. The two Koreas are an extreme example. But you can see the same thing on the border of the US and Mexico, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, and dozens of other neighboring countries. In all of these cases, the people and land were fairly similar, but the border changed everything. "It's all about institutions," Daron Acemoglu, one of the authors, explained. "It's really about human-made systems, rules, regulations, formal or informal that create different incentives." When these guys talk about institutions they mean it as broadly as possible: it's the formal rules and laws, but also the norms and common practices of a society. Lots of countries have great constitutions
              BRABAT faz reconhecimento na região Sul do Haiti    
    none
              TPS Designation for Syria    
    Today the USCIS released details on Temporary Protective Status (TPS) application procedures for eligible Syrian nationals.  In addition to Syria, other designated countries include El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, and South Sudan. TPS designation can be made by the Secretary of Homeland Security when a foreign country has conditions that temporarily prevent the...
              Cast, Creatives Complete for KILL LOCAL World Premiere at La Jolla Playhouse   

    La Jolla Playhouse announces the cast and creative team for its world-premiere production of Kill Local, by UC San Diego MFA playwriting graduate Mat Smart, directed by Jackson Gay (Kingdom City), running August 1 - 27 (press opening: Sunday, August 6) in the Sheila and Hughes Potiker Theatre.

    The cast will feature Matthew Amendt (Playhouse's Hollywood) as "Todd," Carolyn Braver (Broadway's Airline Highway) as "Ami," CAndy Buckley (Broadway's After the Fall) as "Gloria," Amanda Quaid (Broadway's Equus) as "Sheila" and Xochitl Romero (Off-Broadway's Chimichangas and Zoloft) as "Abi."

    The creative team includes Wilson Chin (Hollywood), Scenic Designer; Jessica Ford, Costume Designer; Paul Whitaker (Kingdom City), Lighting Designer; Daniel Baker, Sound Designer; Steve Rankin (Guards at the Taj, Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots), Fight Director; Shirley Fishman, Dramaturg; and Rob Chikar, Stage Manager.

    "Both savage and savagely funny, Kill Local electrified the crowd during its DNA New Work Series reading this past December. With this full production in our subscription season, it's extremely gratifying to introduce a larger audience to UC San Diego playwriting alum Mat Smart's bloody workplace comedy, featuring a Broadway-seasoned cast and creative team," said Playhouse Artistic Director Christopher Ashley.

    Sheila and her sister Abi work for their mother's small family business. Sheila's job used to be a source of joy and exhilaration; now she's questioning everything. But when you're an assassin, being uninspired means getting sloppy, and getting sloppy means getting killed. Kill Local is a pitch-black comedy about blood ties, revenge and trying to get unstuck - especially when your life is dedicated to ending others'.

    Kill Local was featured as part of the Playhouse's acclaimed DNA New Work Series, which offers playwrights the opportunity to develop a script and receive valuable audience feedback. Several Playhouse mainstage productions have been developed through the DNA New Work Series, including Miss You Like Hell, The Last Tiger in Haiti, Blueprints to Freedom, The Who & The What and Chasing the Song.

    A graduate of the UC San Diego MFA playwriting program, Mat Smart won the 2015 Equity Jeff Award for Best New Work in Chicago for The Royal Society of Antarctica (Gift Theatre, Stage West). Other plays include: Naperville (Slant Theatre Project, Theater Wit), Tinker to Evers to Chance (Geva, Merrimack Rep), Samuel J. and K. (Williamstown Theatre Festival, Steppenwolf), The Hopper Collection (Magic Theatre, Huntington) and The 13th of Paris (City Theatre, Seattle Public Theatre). Awards & Fellowships: 2014 Otis Guernsey New Voices Award from the William Inge Center for the Arts, Edgerton Foundation New Play Award, two Jerome Fellowships and a McKnight Advancement Grant. Commissions: South Coast Rep, Huntington, Denver Center, and currently, La Jolla Playhouse, The Second City, and Geva Theatre Center.

    Jackson Gay directed La Jolla Playhouse's world-premiere production of Kingdom City. Her recent works include the new musical CHIX 6 by Lourds Lane (La MaMa); Chekhov's Three Sisters (Studio Theatre/New Neighborhood); Lisa Lampanelli's Stuffed (Women's Project); Transfers by Lucy Thurber (New York Stage & Film); Much Ado About Nothing, adapted with Kenneth Lin (Cal Shakes); Suzanne Vega's Lover, Beloved: An Evening with Carson McCullers with music by Duncan Sheik (Rattlestick West LA); These Paper Bullets!, adapted from Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, by Rolin Jones with music by Billie Joe Armstrong (Atlantic Theater Company, Geffen Playhouse, Yale Rep; Critics Pick Time Out NY, Best Production and Adaptation LA Stage Awards, Best of 2015 Time Out Los Angeles, Connecticut Critics Circle Award Best Production and Best Director). She teaches directing at Yale College and is from Sugar Land, Texas.

    The Tony Award-winning La Jolla Playhouse is internationally-renowned for creating some of the most exciting and adventurous work in American theatre, through its new play development initiatives, its innovative Without Walls series, artist commissions and residencies. Currently led by Artistic Director and 2017 Tony Award winner Christopher Ashley and Managing Director Michael S. Rosenberg, the Playhouse was founded in 1947 by Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire and Mel Ferrer, and reborn in 1983 under the artistic leadership of Des McAnuff. La Jolla Playhouse has had 28 productions transfer to Broadway, garnering 38 Tony Awards, among them the currently-running, Tony Award-nominated hits Come From Away and Indecent, along with Jersey Boys, Memphis, The Who's Tommy, Big River, as well as Billy Crystal's 700 Sundays and the Pulitzer Prize-winning I Am My Own Wife, both fostered as part of the Playhouse's Page To Stage Program. Visit LaJollaPlayhouse.org.


              How much money makes Arnold Antonin? Net worth   
    Arnold Antonin Net Worth Arnold Antonin made money by Directors niche. For all time, at the moment, 2017 year, Arnold Antonin earned $80 Million. Exact sum is $80000000. Youtube Short biography, height, weight, dates: Birth date: 1942, Port-au-Prince, Haiti Birth place: Port-au-Prince, Haiti Profession: Director, Writer, ProducerMovies: Le President a-t-il le sida ? Pictures Summary …
              John Fielder and Littleton Middle School Student Team Up with New Book to Raise Money for Haitian Villages   

    Nature photographer John Fielder announces his 4th children’s book: Nadia’s Good Deed, A Story About Haiti. Available at book retailers throughout Colorado on April 14th.

    (PRWeb May 07, 2014)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11830904.htm


              semba wrote a new post, From the Web: In Haiti, A Startup Is Building 100% Renewable Grids For Towns With No Power, on the site The SEMBA Review   
    none
              The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Part Two   
    This post is continued from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Part One.

    The Bad and the Ugly


    When Clint Eastwood rides into town wearing a poncho, people pay attention.  It must be ... The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.  


    I talked about The Good points of the PB's budget proposal here.  And I want to be clear - the good points of this proposal are enough to win my support.  This proposal is a vast improvement over the Executive Council proposed budget that came out a few months ago, and caused such a brouhaha.  A kerfuffle.  A dustup.  A mad dash to find the Confederate gold ... no, wait, that's Clint Eastwood again.  


    I think we should vote for the PB's proposal, with some adjustments that will no doubt be considered carefully by PB&F as they listen to input in their hearings.  Mostly I support the PB's proposal because it adopts a mission-based and much healthier format that the tired old Canonical, Corporate, Program format, and also because it has much better information regarding necessary staffing levels than Executive Council had.


    But as we go to a vote, we need to understand also the negative points of this proposal: the Bad and ,,,


    The Ugly.


    I really don't have to explain the Ugly to you.  I will leave the astonishment over the crazy process that gave rise to the current budget fracas to Katie Sherrod and the Crusty Old Dean.  I just have to say that I am truly troubled that people have been hurt, that well-intentioned input has been disregarded, that there are mysteries to what happened in this budget melee that still have not been unraveled.  When we in the church start disrespecting, disregarding, and hurting each other, I am concerned that we have lost our way.  Our beloved BCP says that the mission of the church is "to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ" (p. 855).  We are not modeling that reconciliation well within the church; why would others want to join us in our unreconciled differences?  


    Can't we make a pact to give each other the benefit of the doubt at this Convention?  Can't we give each other credit for loving Jesus and following him the best way we know how?  Can't we listen, share, and discern God's way forward in atmosphere of trust and respect?  Rodney King has just died - in his honor, can't we all just get along?


    It's time for a change in the way we do things ... a big, sweeping change, led by the Holy Spirit, putting an end to old things and taking on new things for a new era.


    But more on that later.  For now ... back to Clint Eastwood.


    The Bad


    It's maybe a bit of an exaggeration to call this "bad" (but we're sticking with Clint Eastwood, by gosh).  But there are a few things I think we should be aware of.  


    > This proposed budget does not increase the percentages of funding devoted to mission as much as it appears to.  The pie charts at the back of the document would have us believe that "mission" has increased from 53% (in Bishop Sauls' famous presentation to the House of Bishops) to 67%.  A lot of this apparent increase is due to some accounting reclassifications.  For instance:

    • $4.5 million of principal payments on the 815 debt were moved out of administrative expenses altogether, and shown in the PB's proposed budget as a discretionary use of cash surplus rather than an administrative expense (which it was in the EC budget).  The money is still being spent, on exactly the same thing it was before (that lovely hierarchical-model headquarters building), but it's no longer counted as administrative expense, or any kind of expense.  This is not a reduction in administrative expenditures.  But it makes the percentages look better.  
    • The new budget takes $4.6 million of administrative services provided to affiliated organizations, like ERD, ECF, UTO, etc., breaks them out separately, and includes them in the percentages devoted to "mission."  Those same expenses were incurred in EC's budget, but included in administration.  Again, it makes the percentages look better while changing nothing.
    • Funding for the Development Office in this budget, as in the EC budget, comes from a special draw on the endowment, shown in income.  The EC budget had an inexplicable error that needed to be corrected: it showed expenses less than income for this item of $1,250,000.  Therefore the EC budget was actually a deficit budget of this amount.  The PB's budget has corrected this error and described the costs of the Development Office as a "mission" expenditure.  The correction needed to be made.  But again, it increases the percentages.
    • The PB's budget shows a special collection for Haiti, spearheaded by the Development Office, in the amount of $1.6 million, and also shows it in "mission" expenditures.  The expense is a wash - income equals expense, and presumably if the Development Office doesn't succeed in raising the funds, the money won't be spent - but it increases, once again, the "mission" percentage.  
    • I calculate that if the above items were treated consistently with EC's treatment, the percentages in this budget would be Mission - 60%; Governance - 11%; Administration - 29%.  Still an improvement over the percentages in Bishop Sauls' presentation.  Just not as dramatic an improvement as it appears on first glance. 
    • Please understand, the accounting treatment of all the above items is appropriate; we should just not understand them as actually improving our situation.  


    > I am not convinced that it is appropriate to fund a new Development Office from the endowment.  I generally think we do need a Development Office, but unless that office is raising funds for the endowment, I do not think it should be funded from the endowment.  This is drawing down our permanent asset base to pay operating expenses.  According to a copy of the Development Office Strategic Plan, the initiatives it is planning to support include the Archives, rebuilding in Haiti, church planting, and support for Navajoland and other area missions.  These are operating expenses.  If this office is important to us (which it probably is), we should find a way to fund it from operations.  Or, be honest about it and change the percentage draw we are taking from our endowment investments to show the Development Office as an operating expense.

    > Likewise, I am not sure where the special initiative for Haiti, which is listed as a separate income item and which the Development Office is supposed to support, comes from.  Who created this priority?  If Executive Council agreed with this priority, why was it not in their budget?  If staff created this priority, I think it needs to be agreed to by General Convention.  Which I guess is what we're doing in this budget.  I just think things need to be clearly stated and justified.  Rebuilding Haiti is a great cause, and I support it. I just think we need to decide together on this priority.  

    > Speaking of which, this budget allocates our entire 0.7% MDG commitment to Haiti.  Let's decide on this together.  

    > Like the EC budget, this budget eliminates the General Board of Examining Chaplains.  I am not crazy about the GOEs myself, remembering long hard days tortuously slogging my way through those things.  I commend to you Crusty Old Dean's alternate proposal for GOEs.  But in the meantime, it is a canonical mandate.  I asked Bishop Sauls how you de-fund a canonical mandate.  He said that the existence of the GOEs is a canonical mandate, but that doesn't mean the funding of them is a canonical mandate.  Sophistry, angels dancing on heads of pins!  He said that perhaps, for instance, the GOEs could be funded entirely from user fees.  So there's that.  But I think this is an example of restructuring by de-funding, which I do not believe is a healthy way to operate.  If we are going to de-fund something, I think we should have a good reason, corporately decided (not by 815 staff), and a plan for how to get that function accomplished otherwise.

    Now, Gentle Reader, if you have followed me this far, I congratulate you.  You have now heard my take on the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly in this budget proposal.  After all is said and done, in my opinion the Good outweighs the Bad or the Ugly in the PB's budget proposal.  Clint Eastwood may now ride into the sunset!  

    I think we should adopt the PB's budget, with perhaps a few changes.  Because:

    >  It directs our attention to Mission.
    >  It contains a few new and needed initiatives.
    >  It shows a good level of conscientious budget-cutting, backed up by much better data than EC had.
    >  It restores Christian Formation and Vocation, which is the subject that got me (and maybe you) all worked up about the budget in the first place.  
    >  It does not make the mistake I believe we made in 2009 of making long-term restructuring decisions based on short-term budget-cutting measures.  
    >  And therefore, it provides us some breathing room.  We can work together, beginning at this Convention and continuing into the next triennium, on discerning God's will for this church.  Structure?  It's not about Structure.  It's about the mission of the church.  God's mission.  Let's pray, read the Bible, study, and discern together where God is leading us.  

    More on this tomorrow.



              The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Part One   

            
    The Episcopal Church's budget process this year could be renamed, as the title of the old Clint Eastwood movie goes, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.  Many faithful and well-intentioned people have worked very hard to create a budget - the Good.  In many ways, they have failed, because of the impossible weight of the bureaucracy and the administrative structure we are saddled with - the Bad.  And, umm, a lot of people on all sides have gotten hurt, polarized, sidelined, disrespected, and disregarded.  The Ugly.  

    I honestly have no way of judging the politics that brought us to this state.  All I can do is look at the competing budget proposals that are before us and do the best I can at analyzing them and judging between them.  (And by the way, before I picked up this church gig, I was a CPA, which is why I have some minimal level of competence at doing this).  This is what I have been doing, these last few days, with the help of some people at 815 who were willing to answer my questions about their budget proposal (as Executive Council members were willing to answer my questions about theirs).  And as I analyze the PB's budget proposal that is before us now, again I see that it contains ... The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.  

    No one is perfect and no budget will do a perfect job.  After carefully investigating and weighing the proposals, I am going to come down in favor of the PB's proposal.  Today and tomorrow, I'll tell you why.  I'll spell out what I see as the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, and I'll tell you why I think we should support this one after all is said and done.

    The Good

            1.  This budget is framed in terms of mission.  2009 Resolution D027 named the Five Anglican Marks of Mission as the strategic priorities for the church, and required that Executive Council and PB&F center the 2013-2015 budget around these priorities. 

    Maybe you don’t care about the Marks of Mission, and I will certainly agree that they are not perfect.  But here is what I like about them.  I have seen an alarming (to me) tendency in The Episcopal Church to equate “mission” with social service.  Social service is a good thing, and we should be doing it out of our Christian convictions.  But the church is not a social service agency with stained glass windows.  We are a worshipping community that follows Christ and strives to live into the kingdom of God that he proclaimed and embodied.  The Marks of Mission recognize this – in fact, they declare that proclaiming the good news of the kingdom is not one distinct activity among several, but is the key statement about everything we do in mission – including worship, which is itself a witness to the world.  Mission, say the Marks, is the act of God in which we join God in the divine mission of loving and serving the world.  Go and read what the Anglican Communion website has to say about the Marks. 

    I believe that in adopting the Marks as priorities, we make central two vital priorities that have been pushed to the sidelines in The Episcopal Church in recent decades:  evangelism (Mark 1) and forming disciples (Mark 2). Let’s refocus our churchwide priorities to list these first.  Are the Marks perfect?  No.  Are they helpful to The Episcopal Church at this stage in our history?  Absolutely.  Do they push us do things that have been neglected, but should have been central to our identity all along?  Without a doubt.    

    Executive Council reportedly discussed the Marks of Mission, but their proposed budget shows no evidence of it.  Whatever discussions they had did not show up in the line items of their proposed budget. 

    (This is probably not Executive Council’s fault.  They are a group of volunteer leaders serving for limited periods of time each year without access to good information.  Staff at 815 hold all the keys – finance information, staff to put it together, full-time familiarity with the work being done on a churchwide level.  Why was this information not shared with Council before?  Oh wait, that question belongs in “The Ugly.”)

    The PB’s new proposed budget shows exactly how each of the priorities are being met.  I find a few of the classifications a bit questionable – for instance, the PB and almost her entire office spend all their time doing nothing but Proclaiming the Good News of the Kingdom (Mark 1)?  Really?  And the House of Bishops Theology Committee and the College for Bishops belong in Mark 2 – Teaching, Nurturing, and Baptizing New Believers?  Seriously?  (If the bishops are new believers, I guess we should give thanks that they have finally seen the light.)    

    Nevertheless, the mere fact of arranging this budget by mission categories rather than the tired old categories of Canonical, Corporate, and Program, means that our attention gets focused on how we can go about accomplishing each component of mission.  And that’s a good thing. 

            2.  This budget increases the percentage of funds devoted to mission as opposed to administration and governance.  Not as much as the pie charts at the back would have you believe.  At first glance, you might think that this budget increases mission from 53% (according to Bishop Stacy Sauls’ famous presentation to the House of Bishops last fall) to 67% (according to the pie chart at the back of the newly released proposed budget). 

    Not so.  Most of the change in percentages happens because things have been reclassified from one category to another.  (More in “The Bad,” tomorrow.)  I think the percentage of real, new funds devoted to mission are increased here by 2 or 3 percentage points at most.  But in a $100+ million budget, you know, a million here, a million there, soon you’re talking about real money.  There isan increase.

            3.  Some of that real money comes from new initiatives.  Again, not as much as you would think at first glance.  But some.  Each Mark of Mission category includes a large new line item that wasn’t there before.  But a great deal of this money was just reclassified to this line item from other line items that were already in the budget.  According to information provided by 815 staff, here is the actual new money for new initiatives this budget contains:

    Mark 1: $2 million includes $175,000 from line 174 (Latino/ 
                   Hispanic Ministries); new money is $1,825,000
    Mark 2: $1 million is entirely reclassified from line 157 (Grants);
                   no new money here
    Mark 3: $1 million includes $380,000 from line 94 and $560,000 
                   from line 95 (Young Adult Service Corps); 
                   hardly any new money here
    Mark 4: $1 million includes what was formerly on line 182 
                   (Jubilee Ministries), which spent almost $1 million last 
                   triennium; hardly any new money here
    Mark 5: $1 million includes $106,000 from line 180 and 
                   $200,000 from line 236; new money is $694,000

    In other words, the increases in Marks 2, 3, and 4 are negligible.  There are new programs – I think – in Marks 1 and 5. 



    I believe there NEEDS to be new money in Mark 1 if we are to grow, and this money is supposed to go to church planting, a vital cause for our church.  I am a bit unclear about the relationship between this new money and the Church Planting office that already exists at 815.  The “Reclassified” money in this category comes from the Office of Latino/Hispanic Ministries. 


    I am not sure that new money is required at the churchwide level in Mark 5, Care of Creation.  If ever there was a ministry that cried out to be accomplished at the local level, this is it.  If I were PB&F and were looking for money to cut from the budget, I would look for it here, in this new $694,000. 

    815 has also not released any details of how these new initiatives are to be carried out.  If there is a plan, I would like to see it.  If there is no plan, I would like to know how one is going to be created, and by whom.  If there is no plan for creating a plan, I would like to know why we need these initiatives.  Other, that is, than to increase our percentages devoted to mission. 

         4.  This budget accomplishes staff cuts in a much more reasonable way than anything Executive Council or PB&F could come up with.  I know, because I tried creating a budget proposal on my own, and it basically involves applying across-the-board percentage reductions without any knowledge of the underlying staffing needs.  815 has access to the information needed to analyze particular positions.  This budget decreases the cost-of-living increase from 3% to 2% and eliminates 12.75 positions.  Many of these are positions that are presently unfilled.  At least one is a program officer who will no longer be an 815 employee, but will receive funding to work for a churchwide network and accomplish the same mission.  The other positions that are being cut have not been released – but I will have to say that 815 leaders are in a much better position than anyone else to make these assessments.  They know their people and their staffing needs – we don’t. 

    The cuts are deeper in the area of administration and governance, including a percentage cut in each area, in addition to deep cuts in Human Resources, IT, finance, etc.  More cuts could be realized if we didn't have to pay for 815 (the building) - but any savings to be realized from a sale or lease there won't come this year, maybe not this triennium.  It takes time to sell a large building like that, even if it is the right thing to do.


         5.  The income projections for Diocesan Commitments appear to be reasonable.  Contrary to some reports, the Diocesan Commitments line does NOT contain the full 19% as if every diocese was going to pay its full share.  These amounts have been carefully counted for reasonableness, and take into account partial (or no) payments by many dioceses.  Development Office and Haiti Collection, I'm not so sure about, but these are "wash" items - income and expense cancel each other out.  


    With regard to the investment income, I am informed that the Investment Committee projected the investment returns at 8%, but the budget projects only a 5% draw.  I am not qualified to make a good judgment on this, but it seems reasonable.

         6.  This budget restores Christian Formation and Vocation. Executive Council didn’t mean to cut it – how it got cut is lost in a bureaucratic maze.  It’s back in the budget.  Thanks be to God. 




              Leaf 7: Cosme Explains the Rain   
    A leaf from:This Broken Land of Promise:A Chronicle of Conservation in the Hispaniolan Border Country“What’s going on with the rain?” I asked Cosme. “¿Hay agua? Is there water?”Cosme Damián Quezada is one of the Tree Bank’s Directors. He’s a farmer in our project area, a rugged tract of mostly deforested cropland and pasture in the Dominican Republic’s border region, just a few miles from Haiti.I was on the phone with him, back in June 2015, when the Tree Bank Nursery was just packed with tree
              Leaf 1: Into the Midst of Things   
    A leaf from:This Broken Land of Promise:A Chronicle of Conservation in the Hispaniolan Border CountryIt has been more than a decade since Matt, Lisa, and I took our first trip to the Dominican Republic, to visit the rumpled northern flank of Hispaniola’s Cordillera Central mountain range, just a few miles from the border with Haiti. Lisa is my wife; she and I founded the Sangha in 1997. Matt is our son and colleague. He was still in high school at the time of that trip; today he is the Sangha’s
              Los Cerezos by the Numbers   
      ​Photo: Commerce in the campo! The interior of a country store in Los Cerezos.   The Tree Bank’s first “Information Harvest” has finally come in! Last March, for the first time, we surveyed all of the farmers in the Tree Bank Hispaniola program, to gather uniform data on their households and farms. We have now organized their responses, and I attempt an interpretive summary below.   The Tree Bank Hispaniola works along part of the Dominican Republic / Haiti border, on the Dominican side, to
              Splurge: Naomi Osaka’s 2017 WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party $495 Caroline Constas Stripe Apollonia Off-the-Shoulder Dress   

    The post Splurge: Naomi Osaka’s 2017 WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party $495 Caroline Constas Stripe Apollonia Off-the-Shoulder Dress appeared first on Fashion Bomb Daily Style Magazine: Celebrity Fashion, Fashion News, What To Wear, Runway Show Reviews.

    19 year-old Haitian-Japanese tennis phenom Naomi Osaka hit up the 2017 WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party, clad in a $495 Caroline Constas Stripe Apollonia Off-the-Shoulder Dress: Her smocked dress features an off the shoulder neckline, flared sleeves, and allover stripes. So cute! I’ve got my eye on her. If you’re up for the splurge, get Naomi’s frock…

    The post Splurge: Naomi Osaka’s 2017 WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party $495 Caroline Constas Stripe Apollonia Off-the-Shoulder Dress appeared first on Fashion Bomb Daily Style Magazine: Celebrity Fashion, Fashion News, What To Wear, Runway Show Reviews.


              BRABAT faz reconhecimento na região Sul do Haiti    
    none
              For sale - rare nike air pegasus 31 wings glow in dark black... - $52   

    Zetland 2017, Australia
    Posting to: Americas, Europe, Asia, Australia Excludes: Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Liberia, Libya, Mauritius, Western Sahara, Iraq, Lebanon, Turkey, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan Republic, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Guam, Guernsey, Jersey, British Virgin Islands, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Macau
    ebay.com.au

              Correction: Haiti-Northern Visit story   
    In an April 11 story, The Associated Press erroneously reported that top State Department officials made an unannounced visit to northern Haiti. The story should have said the visit was included on a State Department public schedule, but that the delegate
              Henry Raines Show 05/09/10 Hour 1   
    Guest: Guest: Bud Chiles, Lawton Chiles Foundation , http://www.lawtonchiles.org/ , www.worsttofirst.org , discusses his recent trip to Haiti. Guest: Atty. Scott R. Bickford http://mbfirm.com/ , Martzell & Bickford Law Firm, is representing the family of one of the deceased Horion oil rig workers as well as one of the surviving crew members. Scott Bickford is a trial attorney who for over 25 years has represented the rights of injured workers and their families in environmental cases. He has represented hundreds of individuals exposed to asbestos, welding fumes, and other toxic substances. As part of this representation, he has successfully tried numerous cases involving different asbestos illnesses, participated on national panels involving asbestos litigation problems, and has lectured extensively on asbestos trial practice to other attorneys. Mr. Bickford served as a member of the Asbestos Claimants' Committee in the Babcock and Wilcox Bankruptcy. In addition to his asbestos practice, Mr. Bickford represents various governmental and private landowners in environmental land damage cases. He has litigated oil and gas royalty disputes, commercial oil and gas disputes and criminal matters including mail fraud, drug possession, money laundering and homicide. While a member of the firm he has also litigated medical malpractice cases and maritime personal injury cases. Mr. Bickford has represented clients before the federal appellate courts, as well as several elected officials in both local and national election contests. In 1996, he represented U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu in an election contest before the United States Senate. He has also served as a court appoint special mater in attorney fee litigation disputes and has served as an expert witness in attorney fee arbitration
              2011: a year in techno   
    Here’s our list of our favourite singles, albums and labels of 2011. 10 singles: Conforce – Dystopian Elements EP [Delsin] Record of the year. The Martian – Techno Symphonic In G [Red Planet] Reggie Dokes – Haiti [Clone Royal Oak] Floating Points – Shadows [Eglo] Omar-S – Here’s Your Trance Now Dance ! [FXHE] Santiago [...]
              Foreign Office updates travel advice for the Dominican Republic   
    Tourists warned of risk of armed robbery close to Haiti
              God’s medicine, Gorry Be…   

    Anything but Humble: Holy Man’s Cure-All Found to Be Toxic
    BY MEGHAN HAMILTON • 16 MARCH 2016
    http://thehumanist.com/news/international/anything-humble-holy-mans-cure-found-toxic

    … On March 4 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation aired on The Fifth Estate (their “premier investigative program”) a story about widespread poisoning by religious “healers.” In the episode titled “True Believers,” host Mark Kelley investigates a trend of religious healing that requires the sick to ingest a solution of chlorine dioxide numerous times a day with the promise that they will be cured of whatever ails them. The solution, called the Miracle Mineral Supplement or MMS for short, is essentially a mixture of bleach and water to be taken every hour for a certain number of days depending on the specific ailment.

    According to Jim Humble, creator of the MMS treatment program and founder of the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing, the treatment will cure everything from AIDS to Ebola to the common cold. Humble (can that name be real?) claims he’s been sent to earth from a “Planet of the Gods” in the Andromeda galaxy on a mining mission, at which point he discovered the miracle cure. In order to have access to his healing potion, followers pay a membership fee of $35. The treatment was first advertised to poor families in Haiti and the Dominican Republic as a low-cost solution to their medical needs. ...

    Yeah, sometimes the prospect of human extinction doesn’t just seem inevitable, but sword of cosmic justice in action.


              Are Canada’s embassies around the world earthquake-proof?   
    By Steve Rennie OTTAWA – Four years after an earthquake devastated Haiti, the federal government wants to know how a handful of its embassies would hold up to similar tremors. Foreign Affairs served notice last week that it will be […]
              Actor Sean Penn compares Port-au-Prince, Haiti, to Detroit in interview with Esquire magazine   
    NEW YORK — As the three-year mark approaches of the devastating earthquake in Haiti that killed, injured and displaced hundreds of thousands of people, actor- activist Sean Penn describes life in the country’s capital city. In the January issue of […]
              #SubwayLibrary Suggestions: True Stories   

    Subway Library

    There's so much available to read on the #SubwayLibrary — a service that delivers free e-books brought to you by MTA, Transit Wireless, and NYC's libraries— it can be hard to choose which books to peruse on your commute. Lucky for you, we're going to put together a list of our favorite titles in a given category every week, so you can get the best recommendations for what to read from our NYPL experts.

    This week's category: true stories. Our collection of nonfiction encompasses several genres, including biography, memoir, journalism, science writing, and essays. Whether you're looking to immerse yourself in a tropical exploration, learn all there is to know about the world of microbes, or just have a great laugh, you can find what you're looking for in the true stories section.

    The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae

    The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

    The title says it all. In this sweet, funny, candid autobiography, comedia Issa Rae of HBO's Insecure describes what it feels like to be an introvert in an extroverted world. Excerpt, a 1-hour read.

    The Lost City of the Monkey God by Douglas Preston

    The Lost City of the Monkey God

    Adventure abounds in this real-life thriller, which chronicles the author's journey with a group of scientists to search for an ancient civilization in Honduras. But after their treacherous adventure ends, something even more tragic befalls the group at home: a mysterious lethal disease, contracted in the tropics. Excerpt, a 1-hour read.

    The Zombie King by Emily Matchar

    The Zombie King
    Emily Matchar traces our collective obsession with zombies back to its roots: William Seabrook, an American writer who claimed he met a real zombie on an island near Haiti in 1928. Originally published in The Atavist Magazine. Full text, a 1-hour read.

    I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong

    I Contain Multitudes

    Get a “microbe’s-eye view” of the world in this engrossing, in-depth look at the smallest creatures on Earth. Excerpt, a 1-hour read.

    The Dallas Cowboys by Joe Patoski

    Dallas Cowboys

    Get an insider's look at this American football team, one of the most influential in the NFL over the course of their over-50 year history. Excerpt, a 2+ hour read.

    Check out more information about #SubwayLibrary, including more of our favorite reads and instructions on how to access. What are your favorite short reads available on #SubwayLibrary? Share them with us in the comments.


              Félix Benítez Rexach - 2   

    La semana pasada reseñamos datos recogidos del libro de José Almoina, Una satrapía en el Caribe, sobre el curioso personaje que fue Félix Benítez Rexach, cuya incidencia en nuestro país se prolongó por más de 40 años.Almoina indica que cuando el presidente de los Estados Unidos, Franklin D. Roosevelt, el 6 de enero de 1941 pronunció su discurso que se conoce como el de las “cuatro libertades humanas”, que consistían en la libertad de expresión, la libertad religiosa, la libertad de vivir sin penuria y la libertad de vivir sin miedo, los habitantes de la República Dominicana se miraban con extrañeza, preguntándose si Roosevelt iría a instituir dichas libertades en toda la faz de la tierra. Cita Almoina que Trujillo reía socarronamente de estas declaraciones, y que en estas risas lo acompañaba Benítez Rexach. Finalmente Almoina indica que para esa época Rexach se había hecho rico a través del erario nacional.

    También Porfirio Rubirosa, en su libro “Mis memorias”, narra su relación con el constructor norteamericano (nacido en Puerto Rico), que se inició en 1935, cuando Trujillo tuvo en mente la construcción del puerto de la ciudad capital. Indica Rubirosa que eran los primeros años del régimen de Trujillo y que las finanzas todavía no estaban muy florecientes. Se hablaba del puerto sin ver surgir nunca la primera piedra, cuando un abogado nombrado Coll-Cuchí, con escritorio en la presidencia, le habló a Trujillo de Benítez. Se le informó a Trujillo que Benítez construiría el puerto a un precio fuera de concurso. Rubirosa indica que en ese momento Benítez era un ingeniero en dificultades, y que Trujillo aceptó la sugerencia. Como Benítez no tenía relación directa con Trujillo, buscó a Rubirosa, yerno de Trujillo, (esposo de Flor de Oro Trujillo), como intermediario y le sugirió que comprara una draga para que participara en los trabajos del muelle. Rubirosa confiesa que pensó que esa era la manera de hacerse de algún capital económico, y que de inmediato se hizo de la draga. En vez de hacerse rico, este gasto significó una pérdida para Rubirosa, porque Benítez cada día le encargaba trabajos en diferentes localidades, lo que significó una pérdida cuantiosa de dinero al tener que movilizar constantemente el pesado aparato, aparte de que ya Benítez había llegado a tener relaciones directas con Trujillo, por lo que ya no necesitaba a Rubirosa. Cuenta Rubirosa que se enfrentó a Benítez y lo amenazó con destruirlo si no le pagaba. Benítez, ni corto ni perezoso, se fue donde Trujillo y le contó que Rubirosa quería matarlo. Final de la historia: Benítez siguió con su trabajo y Rubirosa salió del país a un puesto diplomático, designado en Berlín, por cierto, en tiempos de Hittler.

    Rubirosa recuerda que vio a Rexach con su pelo largo y sombrero de paja. Y parece que éste fue siempre su atuendo, ya que Benítez vivía en la César Nicolás Penson esquina Máxima Cabral, en una casa preciosa, con un bello maderamen, diseño y construcción de Tomás Auñón, y que era conocida como la Casa Faber, nombre de su dueño original, y que fue destruida hace unos años para dar paso a un edificio de apartamentos. Benítez transitaba en un vehículo negro, grande, posiblemente de una marca europea, no muy nuevo, por la Máximo Cabral, calle de la vivienda por muchos años de la autora de esta Página, quien observó, numerosísimas veces, en los años 50, que Benítez tenía el pelo largo, blanco, descuidado, que usaba un sombrero, que su vestimenta siempre era de kaki y que tenía un infaltable pañuelo anudado en el cuello. Y con respecto a esta vestimenta, un lector de Retro informó a esta Página que en una estadía de unos tres meses que el lector estuvo en Puerto Rico, luego de muerto Trujillo, pudo conversar con Benítez en el Hotel Normandie, y llevaba el atuendo descrito. El lector indica que el personaje era amable, sencillo, pero pagado de sí mismo. Hablaba constantemente de sus éxitos y realizaba análisis enjundiosos de cuanto tema podía surgir entre los dos. En cuanto a los temas diversos, esto es completamente cierto, puesto que en la extensa base de datos de OGM encontramos una cantidad apreciable de artículos suyos sobre ríos, presas, aduanas, zonas francas, azúcar, cuota azucarera, reforma agraria, regalía pascual, impuesto sobre la renta, etc., etc., etc. Sobre el Normandie, muy conocido y concurrido en su época, era propiedad de Benítez.

    Para terminar con el perfil del reseñado, se incluye a continuación un mensaje recibido de otro lector, petromacorisano, que proporciona datos muy interesantes, y da detalles compartidos por muchos que lo conocieron, de la controvertida personalidad de Benítez.

    He aquí la nota recibida:

    “Vi a Félix Benítez Rexach, remontarse de uno de los dos pequeños automóviles franceses que había traído a SPM. Me encontraba, en los años 50, del Siglo pasado, viendo creo, que las montañas de agua, lodo y pescados que se formaban, entiendo que en Miramar, como parte del dragado del Higuamo, mientras también éste construía el puerto de San Pedro. Había traído un enorme dique flotante, que suscitaba la curiosidad de todos los muchachos que íbamos a la Avenida, a verlo bajar, meter en su vientre a un barco, repararlo en pocos días, y volver a hundirse para que éste saliera. Meses después, nos había quitado el lugar de pesca desde el flamante muelle de concreto. Allí había amarrado un mediano barco de guerra norteamericano, que había comprado. Con expertos macorisanos, iba convirtiéndolo en uno de los yates más elegantes y lujosos que ancló en los puertos del Mediterráneo: el Goose. Muchos años después, le visité en compañía de un amigo para buscar fondos para la educación superior (UNPHU). No le conocíamos pero estaba en una lista de gente que podía ayudar económicamente al esfuerzo de cientos de Quijotes de la Enseñanza. Hablamos de muchos temas, antes de entrar en la cuestión. A mi pregunta de cómo fue que vino al país, me dijo que Trujillo había pedido a un montón de ingenieros dominicanos cómo hacer un rompeolas para proteger el puerto y el Placer de los Estudios, que tenía como seis meses esperando dichos estudios y Trujillo quería empezar de una vez. Uno, dice, que le expresó Trujillo, que por allí, otro que por acá, otros que más lejos. Estaban en tierra “in situ”. Entonces Benítez Rexach, le preguntó a Trujillo, ¿Por dónde lo quiere Su Excelencia? Por aquí - le respondió. Pues mañana empezamos hacer el rompeolas por aquí. Lo tendremos listo en alrededor de seis meses. Empiece ya, le dijo el Dictador. Y ahí está, nos dijo orgulloso. Al hablarle de que nos donara fondos para la UNPHU, dijo que las universidades debían preparar muchachas en las diferentes ramas de la enfermería y auxiliares médicos y los varones, preparados en las artes de todo lo que tuviera que ver con el turismo. Si salen del país, encontrarán trabajo de una vez. Nos habló de su preocupación por la entrada ilegal de extranjeros haitianos, nos dijo que el Estado Dominicano debía evitar su explosión demográfica. Eso fue quizás en los años 1975 del mentado siglo pasado. Es la única vez que hablé con él. No sabía lo de José Antonio Caro, mencionado en tu artículo quien fue el primer Rector de la UNPHU, ya lo había sido de la UASD. Lo lamento de verdad.

    “Naya: Me motivó a escribirte lo interesante de tu artículo, amén del personaje. No le conocí, salvo ese día que fui con un amigo. Ahora recuerdo, en San Pedro de Macorís era tenido como un genio. Con él se formaron muchos jóvenes brillantes, como un joven Crime, y muchos más. Me enteré que era un tipo polémico y, como vos decís, necesariamente todas sus actuaciones no fueron correctas. Esa es la vida. Un abrazo, y te renuevo mis felicitaciones.”

    Todavía, hay mucho que contar de Félix Benítez Rexach, controvertido, e interesante personaje.


              Uchida and Haitink prove a massive hit   
    Mitsuko Uchida – musical genius
    There are too few days and too few hours and two few minutes, of course, but having said all that, I don’t go to enough concerts.

    It was 2008 when we managed to catch one of Daniel Barenboim’s cycle of Beethoven sonata concerts at the Royal Festival Hall.

    As the music began, everything else simply disappeared: imagine being at the centre of a leap to warp speed in an episode of Star Trek. There was just Barenboim, his piano and me.

    It was the most personal experience that I have ever had – and light years away from listening to any recording, no matter how good. It took Beethoven away from the polite academics and restored to him the passion and the fire that saw him build the bridge that led from the Classical period to the Romantic one.

    Last night, at London’s Barbican, the experience was not much different, as the London Symphony Orchestra, with Bernard Haitink in charge and Mitsuko Uchida at the keyboard, gave us old Ludwig’s piano concerto 3 in C minor.

    Penned in 1800, it was first performed in 1803 with the composer as soloist. In three movements – conventional at the time – but when it was premiered, the composer had barely sketched in the final stages of the final movement and played them from memory.

    Thus it was an ‘unfinished’ work.

    Here, Uchida gave us a performance of exquisite playing: firm and yet light of touch; music to set the nerves tingling; perfect phrasing and a glorious sense of the ebb and flow of the piece. And alike absolutely heaving with emotion.

    The second movement in particular was simply sublime.

    And the orchestra, with which I have been less than enthralled on previous occasions – not least during during Valery Gergiev’s time, as he actively wrecked his own reputation as some sort of conducting ‘great’ – was on very fine form under the vastly more restrained but powerful baton of Haitink.

    At 88, there are no wasted gestures from the maestro. If he has to take it slow moving between podium and back stage, it is without doubt clear that he retains the knowledge and musical understanding of decades.

    That really is the best that I have heard from the LSO – and that was a band that, during the second half, need a bunch of its horn players top switch to Wager tubas.

    Bernard Haitink – musical genius
    Note: they’re not really part of the tuba family but they are fabulous in tone.

    Acoustically, incoming director Simon Rattle has supported a new concert venue for the capital and the LSO, on the grounds of the acoustics, being not great.

    For the Beethoven, in my opinion, they were superb. For the Bruckner – one could tell he has a point ; certainly when a full-blown Romantic sound is required.

    It was a really fine performance. This is big music. We have eight French horns that become four – and then four Wagner tubas (which are mis-named), but which, irrespective of name, have a fabulous richness of tone.

    Bruckner, dying as he was, dedicated this work to God. Yet it has a sense of raging against the fading light, before the sweet and calm resolution with which we are left (this too was unfinished).

    Fabulous stuff, certainly, though one could be forgiven for having a sense that the composer enjoyed a certain post-Wagner sense of creating ‘noise’ rather than ‘music’.

    Not that that is bad under the circumstances, but it does suggest a dying of the romantic light.

    Still, we are left with only one conclusion – that in such a venue, Beethoven, played by one of the world’s greats, sounds better than a lesser work.

    And if you ever needed an incentive to get to a concert – take it from this. Because the experience is beyond what most get to know.



              Berättelser från Haiti efter orkanen   
    Mannen som inte har mat och desperat försöker få tag på släktingar i USA. Den hemlösa kvinnan som flyttat in i en väninnas hus som står tomt efter att hon fått en vägg över sig. Det är Haiti nu.
              J-Kruz Sits Down w/ Zoey Dollaz and Talks Dallas Cowboys, Platanos, Being Haitian and More [VIDEO]   
    Got a chance to sit down with Zoey Dollaz, we talked about being Haitian, platanos, about how he got his start and how his life has changed, from being stabbed on his birthday too how different birthdays are now. Find out what he’s doing to stay out of trouble and last but not least about […]
              Using ICTs to Map the Future of Humanitarian Aid (part 1)   
    Haiti map after the 2010 earthquake. Over 450 OpenStreetMap volunteers from an estimated 29 countries digitized roads, landmarks and buildings to assist with disaster response and reconstruction. OpenStreetMap/ITO World

    The word “disruption” is frequently used to describe technology’s impact on every facet of human existence, including how people travel, learn, and even speak.

    Now a growing cadre of digital humanitarians and technology enthusiasts are applying this disruption to the way humanitarian aid and disaster response are administered and monitored.

    Humanitarian, or crisis, mapping refers to the real-time gathering and analysis of data during a crisis. Mapping projects allows people directly affected by humanitarian crises or physically located on the other side of the world to contribute information utilizing ICTs as diverse as mobile and web-based applications, aggregated data from social media, aerial and satellite imagery, and geospatial platforms such as geographic information systems (GIS).

    Enter the Mappers

    When a crisis strikes, it can be difficult for aid teams to coordinate their response if the affected area has been insufficiently mapped.

    Enter the humanitarian mappers – thousands of mostly unpaid volunteers that provide vital information to aid agencies and responders by: monitoring social media in the affected area to see how or where the crisis is spreading; keeping tabs on news reports to gauge any impact on communication networks; and downloading satellite imagery of poorly mapped regions to ensure critical infrastructure – such as hospitals, roads and communications networks – have been properly identified.

    Utilizing maps and satellite imagery from Google, the U.S. Department of State’s Humanitarian Information Unit and other providers, mapping can be of a single hazard or several hazard maps  can be combined in a single map to provide a composite picture.

    One of the first major crisis mapping events was the 2010 Haiti earthquake which left hundreds of thousands dead and damaged infrastructure. Hundreds of mappers tracked Tweets from affected Haitians and used satellite imagery from the World Bank to carefully trace the road network in-country. According to leading digital humanitarian Dr. Patrick Meier, this crowdsourced map became “the most detailed roadmap of Haiti ever produced” and was done in a matter of days.

    Mapping tools

    A few well-known mapping tools are Ushahidi, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT), MapAction, and the International Network of CrisisMappers. Ushahidi, out of Kenya, tracks election monitoring and citizen engagement as well as crisis mapping, and is considered a leader in the field. Over 3,500 volunteers have collectively made 12 million edits to OpenStreetMap according to its web site, while CrisisMappers engages more than 8,900 members in over 160 countries. MapAction trains volunteers on its individual mapping service and deploys them to crisis areas with the United Nations’ rapid response Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) team.

    HOT was the mapping platform used in the 2010 Haitian earthquake. Tyler Radford, HOT’s Executive Director, said that the group works with a range of partners to stay on the cutting edge of the mapping field.

    “We work to serve the needs of humanitarian partners active on the ground such as American Red Cross, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), and many more, “he said. “We have operations in Northern Uganda to assist in providing better information on the South Sudan [refugee] crisis, and in Turkey to support Syrian refugees.”

    Although HOT, along with partners at Missing Maps, has put more than thirty million people on the world map, many places in the world are still largely invisible. And HOT plans to do something about it.

    “Over the next 3 to 5 years, HOT will be working on making mapping even more widely accessible to more people than at any time in history. …We are researching things like artificial intelligence (AI) to automatically detect and extract features like buildings and roads from satellite imagery,” said Radford. “We are helping more local OpenStreetMap enthusiasts run projects that contribute to real-world challenges in their communities by providing small grants, [and we are] training… more volunteers and local governments to… map the places they live and work and fill critical data gaps.”

    I took HOT’s mapping platform for a spin a few months ago. After inadvertently locking a high priority mapping project underway so that I could play around – my apologies, guys – I picked a lower priority project and attempted to highlight a few buildings and roads in Zimbabwe. The process was actually fun; it was amazing to see what I highlighted become easily identifiable sections of the map. Too nervous to save my changes, it was nonetheless easy to understand why mapping is so appealing and an increasingly important piece of the ‘digital humanitarian’ movement.
              Disasters, funds, and policy: Creatively meeting urgent needs and long-term policy goals   

    Photo: tro-kilinochchi / Flickr

    [[tweetable]]When it comes to responding to disasters, time is of the essence.[[/tweetable]] Help needs to come immediately to save lives; recovery and reconstruction have to start swiftly to lessen the impact.

    However, while money is critical to this response, it’s not just about funding. Indeed, funds need to match the event scale, target the right areas and sectors, and smoothly flow to communities in need. But in order for that to happen, sound public policy on risk and frameworks have to be in place.  

    To address both urgent financial needs while pursing strategic disaster risk management policy goals, countries have been using the World Bank’s development policy loan with a catastrophe deferred drawdown option or, more widely known as the Cat DDO.  

    The loan provides quick liquidity when an eligible disaster event occurs. Governments can rapidly draw on funds either in full amount or in parts and repay later under agreed terms. For example, Sri Lanka accessed over US$100 million for recovery efforts after floods and landslides in May 2016.

    The Cat DDO is more than just emergency lending. Along having a sound macro-economic environment, countries wanting to access this innovative financial instrument also agree to advance specific policy actions that strengthen disaster risk management. In the Philippines, for example, Cat DDO is helping to improve building codes and other policy actions to strengthen the resilience of critical infrastructure. In Latin America, policy dialogue and technical work related to Cat DDOs have contributed to the development of a range of sophisticated risk financing instruments.

    Tailored to country needs, this instrument has proved popular among middle-income countries. Between 2008 and 2017, 15 such loans were approved worth US$2.345 billion.
     
    Now, with the latest replenishment of the International Development Association (IDA)’s concessional financing, Cat DDOs are also available to low-income countries eligible for IDA funding.

    Photo: European Union, European Development Days, EU, June 2017
    Country representatives, World Bank staff, and experts discuss the policy features of the Cat DDO. 
    Photo: European Union, European Development Days, June 2017
    This is good news for communities at risk. As low-income countries are likely to face increased risks due to climate change, rapid urbanization, and fragility and conflict, investing in disaster and climate resilience is an urgent task to protect people and assets. Moreover, research shows that women, the poor, and vulnerable disproportionately bear the brunt of disaster impacts. [[tweetable]]Better response and preparedness can help lessen disaster impact and preserve development gains.[[/tweetable]]

    About this series
    More blog posts
     

    Saint Lucia, Haiti, Kenya, Cabo Verde, and Maldives are already considering Cat DDO credits.  In doing so, they are looking at experience from previous operations which highlights the added value of the instrument such as:
    • Cat DDOs provide immediate liquidity, with countries being able to access funds within 48 hours.
    • Cat‐DDOs help drive the implementation of policy reforms, monitoring outputs, and linking them to sectoral investments.
    • Defining Cat‐DDO policy actions brings together stakeholders across different ministries and agencies enabling disaster risks to be addressed in a comprehensive manner.
    • The instrument provides an opportunity to elevate disaster issues to oversight agencies, such as finance, budget, and economic planning which may not otherwise be engaged in the policy dialogue.
    • CAT DDOs help raise awareness of broader concepts of disaster risk management, and support governments in the process of defining their national risk reduction strategy.
    Some of these aspects were discussed at a recent side event at the World Reconstruction Conference 3 / European Development Days. There, representatives from Serbia explained how after floods in 2014, the CAT DDO became a vehicle for policy change helping them to move away from a reactive to a proactive risk management approach in matter of years. Seychelles’ observations struck a note with the Pacific Island nation of Tonga: quick access to funding is particularly important for countries where geographic isolation poses an additional burden in the recovery process.
     
    As low-income countries work to strengthen their disaster readiness in the years to come, the Cat DDO can play a major role linking the disasters, funds, and policy to ensure that urgent needs are met while long-term policy goals are reached.

    Joaquin Toro, Doekle Geert Wielinga, and Suranga Sooriya Kumara Kahandawa contributed to this blog post.

    Read more blog posts from the third World Reconstruction Conference. 


    Subscribe to our "Sustainable Communities" newsletter and follow us on Flipboard
              Madonna Reunites with Sean Penn in Haiti    

    Madonna reunites with Sean Penn in Haiti, as seen in this photo snapped today. Sean has been working with the Haitian Relief Organization in rebuilding homes after the 2010 earthquake.

              Plâtriers Plaquistes Isolation   
    La société G.F.C vous propose un niveau de prestation parfaitement adapté à vos besoins et à des prix avantageux. Que vous souhaitiez rénover, enduire, décaper ou peindre, vous pouvez compter...

          

    Envoyer à un contact
              Developing Community   
    As I hear news reports about rebuilding Iraq and Afghanistan after the wars, and rebuilding Haiti and New Orleans after natural disasters, I can't help but think about what I'm reading in Walking With Wolf about how they built the community in Monteverde, Costa Rica. To be fair, there may be a difference between building and rebuilding, but it seems to me that the central questions are the same. Most everyone seems starts with "what does the community need?", and "how do we build that?", but perhaps it should be "who is the community?", and "how do they make these decisions?"

    Many times when "settlers" enter a new area the indigenous people see them as something else - "conquerors". This was not the case when Wolf and the other Quakers settled Monteverde, which speaks volumes of their vision of community. In chapter 4, a local Tico talks about the arrival of the Quakers, saying that,
    "For us, it was a great thing when the Quakers came because they brought new ideas. But it was more than that..."
    "It was like a new dawning and it was wonderful. Those of us who stayed became great friends with the Quakers. With them, peace came to our mountain."
    The Quaker settlers were not only interested in creating a home for themselves - they saw themselves as becoming part of a community that included all those that lived there. Initially they created businesses that were centered on their needs and leadership, but they quickly incorporated the needs and voices of the larger community. This can specifically be shown in how they created a credit union to help the locals get loans, and then developed the Monteverde Cheese Factory as a co-op that eventually included far more Ticos than Quakers.

    I find this all very inspiring and believe that a key part of its success is the Quaker belief in consensus. This is the practice of making decisions through unanimous agreement on the path forward, rather than being handed down from authority or even majority rule. It's an incredibly difficult and time consuming method, but has tremendous rewards. As I have been developing this Costa Rica Class, I have tended towards discussion and consensus-seeking when we have new problems and decisions to make. This has included grading criteria, structuring the class time, and fundraising. I have dictated very little, and the students have really stepped up to voice their opinions - and then own their decisions. I hope that you'll check out their blogs (links are on the right), and support their efforts.
              La CIDH sí incluyó a RD en la “lista negra”   

    Washington. La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) rechazó haber cometido algún error al incluir a República Dominicana en su “lista negra” de países sobre el respeto a los derechos humanos.La CIDH incluyó al país caribeño, junto a Cuba y Venezuela, en el capítulo IV de su informe anual, conocido como la “lista negra”, en el que señala los países donde las violaciones de derechos humanos requieren una “atención especial” por parte de este organismo, con sede en Washington. “En referencia a la nota emitida por el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores de República Dominicana el 22 de junio, la CIDH ratifica su decisión de haber colocado a este país en el Capítulo IV del Informe Anual. En dicha decisión no hubo error alguno”, dijo la comisión en un comunicado emitido en las últimas horas.

    En el informe, publicado a finales de abril, la CIDH alerta de “la persistencia de la discriminación racial estructural contra personas de ascendencia haitiana, o percibidas como tales” en República Dominicana, lo cual ha impactado particularmente en “el reconocimiento de la nacionalidad.

    En el nuevo comunicado, no obstante, la CIDH “saluda la disposición” del Gobierno del país “de trabajar en forma conjunta a fin de superar las situaciones que afectan el disfrute pleno de los derechos humanos en ese país. 


              De nunca acabar   

    Lo de las denuncias sobre supuestas violaciones a los derechos humanos en perjuicio de personas de ascendencia haitiana en el país parece ser ya el cuento de nunca acabar. La Comisión Interamericana de los Derechos Humanos (CIDH), un organismo de la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) luce ser el escenario más preciado para los que en base a ese tipo de denuncias se hacen elegibles para recibir y manejar fondos, no importa que una y mil veces tales reclamos choquen con la realidad. El gobierno dominicano no se detiene en invertir tiempo, personal y recursos financieros en mantener una plataforma que in situs es evidencia del trato que reciben en nuestro territorio los emigrantes no solo del vecino país sino de muchas otras naciones. Pero eso no lo observan los denunciantes de las supuestas violaciones a los derechos humanos ni los enviados de la CIDH, cuando ocasionalmente se ha dado el caso de que han venido al país dizque a comprobar la situación. La realidad es que en este caso alguien se está pasando de la raya, y no es precisamente ni el gobierno ni el pueblo dominicanos. Aquí se trata muy humanamente a los emigrantes; esa es la verdad, aunque haya –como siempre- una claque de resentidos que no quieren reconocerlo, y a veces hasta ignoran, o se hacen los ignorantes, que somos un país soberano. Tanto da la gota sobre la piedra hasta que hace el hoyo, dice el pueblo con su proverbial sabiduría. Somos muchos los que creemos que esto se está convirtiendo en el cuento de nunca acabar…

    El informe

    Ahora que los comisionados para estudiar todo lo acontecido en torno a la adjudicación del contrato para la construcción de la planta de Punta Catalina han rendido su informe y se están conociendo algunas aristas de su contenido, ya debemos irnos preparando para que los críticos de siempre empiecen a emitir sus doctas opiniones, sacándole punta al lápiz. Pero, así hemos sido, así somos y así seguiremos siendo. De eso que no quede ninguna duda…


              Turning Away from the Paris Agreement is Unpresidential — and Bad for America   

    Turning Away from the Paris Agreement is Unpresidential — and Bad for America

    A version of this article was originally posted on Devex.com.


    At least since John F. Kennedy’s Alliance for Progress, U.S. presidents have recognized the American interest in promoting prosperity in the developing world. President Donald Trump's pulling out of the Paris Agreement abdicates U.S. leadership in addressing the greatest threat to development of our time: Climate change.

    Over the past five decades, presidents of both parties have launched initiatives to address new or newly perceived threats to global prosperity, from infectious diseases to corruption to terrorism. While what happens in Vegas might stay in Vegas, what happens in other countries doesn’t stay in those countries in an increasingly global and mobile society.

    George W. Bush took the lead on responding to the AIDS crisis by founding the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR; Bill Clinton’s administration targeted gender discrimination by asserting that women’s rights are human rights; Barack Obama’s administration launched the Power Africa initiative to address energy access. U.S. administrations have also recognized the mutually beneficial roles of non-aid channels for supporting prosperity through such means as trade preferences for developing countries and work visas for victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

    And while U.S. efforts to promote development have not always been successful, they have certainly contributed to the astonishing progress made during the past half-century. Charles Kenny’s book Getting Better catalogues the many ways — better health, education, gender equality, civil and political rights — that the quality of life has improved in even the poorest countries.

    Climate change threatens to unravel those gains. The increasing frequency of extreme weather events will place a drag on economic growth, hitting hardest in the poorest countries and households. Exposure to just one severe tropical storm like Hurricane Mitch, which slammed into Central America in 1998, can knock a country off its growth trajectory, preventing full recovery for decades.

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has inventoried the many ways climate instability will exacerbate poverty and inequality: Hunger and loss of livelihoods due to water scarcity and disruption of agro-ecosystems; sickness due to heat stress for urban laborers and increases in water- and vector-borne disease; loss of life and property due to storms and flooding.

    Proactive steps to reduce the emissions that cause global warming and to adapt to the climate change that’s already happening would not only mitigate harm, but can also provide triple wins by benefiting the climate, development and U.S. interests. The Paris Agreement provides a framework for capturing these opportunities.

    Others have commented on the large potential of a shift to renewable energy to provide new markets and investment opportunities. Another opportunity is provided by cooperation to conserve the world’s remaining tropical forests.

    Article 5 of the Paris Agreement focuses on forest conservation as a particularly promising area for international cooperation. Tropical forests and peatlands — mostly in developing countries such Brazil, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Indonesia — are a significant source of global emissions, because when forests are cleared and burned, the carbon they store is released into the atmosphere. In fact, if emissions from tropical deforestation were a country, it would rank third after China and the U.S.

    And reducing deforestation is among the least costly options for emissions abatement. The Paris Agreement provides a framework called Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, or REDD+, that enables rich countries to cooperate with developing countries by rewarding their success in reducing forest-based emissions, with payments contingent on performance.

    But tropical forests offer more than an opportunity to reduce emissions from deforestation. Standing forests provide goods and services important for local and national development. On average, wild products collected from forests constitute more than one-fifth of household incomes in nearby communities. New research shows how forests generate rainfall at continental scales, and how deforestation thus threatens agricultural productivity. Forested watersheds provide access to clean energy by filling the reservoirs behind hydroelectric dams.

    Indeed, forests contribute to achieving at least 10 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals adopted by the international community in 2015. By contrast, deforestation is often a pathway to poverty.

    Beyond reducing emissions from deforestation, tropical forests are critical to meeting the Paris Agreement’s objectives in other ways. Forests — which actively pull carbon out of the air for safe-keeping in vegetation — are the only safe, natural, proven way to capture and store carbon, making them essential to achieving the medium-term mitigation goal of balancing emissions and removals.

    With respect to adaptation, natural forest vegetation provides resilience to the extreme weather events that are becoming more frequent and severe with climate change. Villages protected by mangrove forests are buffered from coastal storms. Undamaged forests are less likely burn.

    Indonesia’s fires in 2015 are estimated to have led to more than 100,000 premature deaths.

    Forested hillsides are more resistant to the landslides such as those that recently killed more than 200 people in Sri Lanka.

    The Paris Agreement is the best instrument for addressing these and other threats to development posed by climate change, and one that was crafted through years of negotiations shaped in large part by U.S. engagement. REDD+ in particular offers a timely opportunity for rich countries to help developing countries to meet both climate and development goals. Trump is reckless to throw it away.


              Creole Formations: Constellations of Créolité in Haitian Contexts   
    Call for Papers Creole Formations: Constellations of Créolité in Haitian Contexts Journal of Caribbean Literatures We invite scholars and Haitian writers to contribute original articles and literary work to Creole Formations: Constellations of Créolité in Haitian Contexts, a special issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Caribbean Literatures that aims to inspire and convene a pluridisciplinary...
    Read More
              Early Bird Chat   
    On This Day: First Lady Michelle Obama greets children at Children’s Place in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 13, 2010 (Photo by Samantha Appleton) One of my all-time faves. **** MoooOOOooorning – Happy Sunday!
              Amnesty urges Chile to release woman arrested for abortion   

    The arrest of a 22-year-old woman in the city of Temuco in Chile for “consensual abortion” must spur the Chilean authorities on to pass proposed legislation to decriminalise abortion, says Amnesty International.

    The arrest of a 22-year-old woman in the city of Temuco in Chile for “consensual abortion” must spur the Chilean authorities on to pass proposed legislation to decriminalise abortion, says Amnesty International.

    The woman, who has been under investigation since Tuesday 10 November, faces charges after a complaint was made by healthcare staff at the hospital where she sought treatment. She arrived at the hospital bleeding after using Misoprostol, a drug sold on the black market to terminate pregnancy. According to information received by Amnesty, the young woman has been placed under partial house arrest and must report to the police monthly as a precautionary measure.

    The case demonstrates the urgency of advancing as quickly as possible the bill which has been in Congress since January 2015, which will regulate abortion on certain grounds, says Amnesty.

    Amnesty International Chile’s Executive Director Ana Piquer said: “Criminalising abortion is a violation of the human rights of women and girls. It is imperative that this young woman be released from house arrest and given the medical care she may need in the future,

    “In Chile in the 21st century the right to choose must become a reality for all.”

    Chile’s Criminal Procedure Code states that health professionals have a duty to report a crime if they see evidence of one. This includes abortion which is considered a crime under Chilean law.

    To counter this, in 2009 the Ministry of Health issued regulations establishing that this rule should not apply in the case of women and girls who “confess” to having undergone a clandestine abortion in order to receive medical attention. However, not all health professionals interpret these rules in the same way and some prioritise the obligation to report a crime out of fear of being criminalised themselves.

    Ana Piquer said: “Chile’s authorities must also ensure that health professionals will not suffer consequences for complying with their duty to medical confidentiality when caring for women with complications arising from unsafe abortions, as reflected in the 2009 rules and international human rights standards.”

    The bill waiting to be passed by Congress since January 2015, will also help protect medical professionals by clarifying that medical confidentiality takes precedence over the duty to report crimes relating to abortion.

    The Americas have some of the most draconian laws on abortion in the world. In Chile, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and Suriname, a total ban on abortion in all circumstances, including for girls and women pregnant as a result of rape or who experience life-threatening complications in their pregnancies, remains in place with those seeking or providing an abortion risking lengthy imprisonment.

    * Amnesty International http://www.amnesty.org.uk/

    [Ekk/4]


              Chile declares an emergency in 'quake aftermath   

    The Chilean government has declared an emergency and international agencies and NGOs are stepping up their response in the aftermath of the 8.8-magnitude earthquake.

    The Chilean government has declared an emergency and international agencies and NGOs are stepping up their response in the aftermath of the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that shook the country early on Saturday 28 February.

    The quake has reportedly killed at least 800 people and displaced hundreds of thousands, causing widespread damage to homes, hospitals, schools, roads and other infrastructure. The Chilean authorities say 2 million people have been affected overall.

    This earthquake came just six and a half weeks after one which was less powerful, but far more deadly in terms of its impact, struck Haiti, where intensive aid operations continue.

    UNICEF made it clear this morning that its humanitarian commitments in Haiti will not stand in the way of providing help to Chile in areas of expertise that may be required.

    "UNICEF will assist all those affected by the earthquake in Chile, especially the children," said a spokesperson for the agency.

    Saturday's quake hit at 3:34 am local time off the Chilean coast. The epicentre was 325 km southwest of the capital, Santiago, but just 100 km from Chile's second-largest city, Concepción, which has a population of more than 200,000. A tsunami triggered by the earthquake caused additional damage in some southern coastal towns.

    The Government of Chile has declared 'zones of catastrophe' in the affected regions, including Bio-Bio, Maule, Araucania, Valparaiso and Metropolitan Santiago.

    Following its initial assessment of needs and damage, the government said today that it would accept some offers of international assistance – particularly aid in the form of field hospitals, temporary bridges and water-purification supplies, as well as damage-assessment experts and search-and-rescue workers.

    Meanwhile, Chile's Ministry of Education has suspended the start of the school year by one week. Classes had been scheduled to resume today (1 March) but will now begin on 8 March.

    While the number of deaths in Chile is expected to rise, it seems likely to reach only a small fraction of the toll from the 12 January earthquake in Haiti. Even though that quake was much lower in magnitude than the one in Chile, extreme poverty and a far more fragile infrastructure magnified the effects of natural disaster in the Caribbean nation.

    The onset of the rainy season in Haiti is currently causing concern about the ability of relief agencies to deliver supplies and services. Nevertheless, UNICEF and its partners in Haiti are moving ahead with an emergency education operation for children affected by the disaster.

    ---

    Christian Aid's Chile emergency appeal: http://www.christianaid.org.uk/emergencies/current/chile-earthquake/inde...

    [Ekk/3]


              Plano Mayor Harry LaRosiliere Previews Second Term   

    To say that Plano Mayor Harry LaRosiliere is excited about a second term would be an understatement.

    "It's a pretty cool thing. If you love what you do, you never work a day in your life. So I am not working as mayor, I am just being me," LaRosiliere said.

    NBC 5 political reporter Julie Fine spoke with LaRosiliere at Legacy West in Plano and asked about his accomplishments in his first term.

    "Legacy West, obviously, because it helped us land over 30,000 jobs," LaRosiliere said.

    LaRosiliere listed several other job-growing accomplishments, including Toyota. But with massive growth, comes growing pains. This was a tougher election campaign for LaRosiliere, as he faced three opponents. There have also been complaints about the addition of apartments, adding cars to already clogged roads.

    "Well, here is the reality. In Collin County there are 76 people a day coming into our county, so the infrastructure is a challenge – not only for Plano, for the cities north of us," he said.

    He points to a 135-percent increase in infrastructure spending since he became mayor.

    "We have $220 million of improvement in terms of our roads in the last few years, as opposed to $35-36 million five years ago. So that has to happen and that is going to continue to happen. That is how we keep people moving," LaRosiliere said.

    LaRosiliere was born in Haiti and moved to Harlem as a child. He eventually moved to Plano and never left. Heading into his second term as mayor, he has another big development goal.

    "My vision is to expand our downtown," LaRosiliere said.

    He has four years to get the project going. The office of Plano mayor is limited to two terms. If LaRosiliere wants a higher office beyond that, he isn't saying.

    "I have always said an elected position other than being the mayor of Plano is a demotion, and I don't want to think about a demotion right now," he said.



    Photo Credit: NBC 5 News
               A Place in the Sun: Haiti, Haitians, and the Remaking of Quebec . By S ean  M ills    
    <span class="paragraphSection"><span style="font-style:italic;">A Place in the Sun: Haiti, Haitians, and the Remaking of Quebec</span>. By MillsSean. (Studies on the History of Quebec.) Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2016. xiv + 304 pp., ill.</span>
              Nueve dominicanos en los rosters para el Juego de las Futuras Estrellas   

    ESTADOS UNIDOS. El Juego de las Futuras Estrellas Sirius XM será el nueve de julio a las 4 p.m. ET en el Marlins Park de Miami, en el marco del 88 Juego de Estrellas que se realizará dos días después en el mismo lugar.

    Ya fueron anunciados los rosters tanto del Equipo del Mundo como el de los Estados Unidos. Los participantes son los mejores prospectos de liga menor, elegidos por su potencial para subir a las Grandes Ligas en un futuro cercano.

    El Equipo del Mundo cuenta con nombres conocidos como el cubano Yoan Moncada y el dominicano Amed Rosario.

    El colombiano Edgar Rentería y Charles Johnson, integrantes de los Marlins campeones de 1997, volverán a Miami para dirigir al Equipo de los Estados Unidos y al Equipo del Mundo, respectivamente, para el Juego de las Futuras Estrellas el 9 de julio.

    Nueve jugadores dominicanos figuran entre los integrantes del Equipo del Mundo: Los pitchers Domingo Acevedo, Jonathan Hernández, hijo de el ex lanzador Fernando Martínez. El receptor Francisco Mejía, Amed Rosario, Rafael Devers y Vladimir Guerrero Jr., hijo de Vladimir Guerrero, como jugadores del cuadro.

    Los jardineros Eloy Jiménez y Víctor Robles. Ademas vera acción el jugador de origen haitiano Estevan Florial.


              Haití: el subdesarrollo y el genocidio   
    Muertes en Haití a consecuencia de la epidemia de cólera
     
    Haití: el subdesarrollo y el genocidio
     
    Fidel Castro Ruz
     
    Hace solo unos meses, el 26 de julio de 2010, Lucius Walker, líder de la organización norteamericana Pastores por la Paz, en un encuentro con intelectuales y artistas cubanos, me preguntó cuál sería la solución para los problemas de Haití.
    Sin perder un segundo le respondí: En el mundo actual no tiene solución, Lucius; en el futuro del que estoy hablando sí. Estados Unidos es un gran productor de alimentos, puede abastecer a 2 000 millones de personas, tendría capacidad para construir casas que resistan a los terremotos; el problema es la forma en que se distribuyen los recursos. Al territorio de Haití hay que restituirle otra vez hasta los bosques; pero no tiene solución en el orden actual del mundo.
    Lucius se refería a los problemas de ese país montañoso, superpoblado, desprovisto de árboles, combustible para cocinar, comunicaciones e industrias, con un elevado analfabetismo, enfermedades como el VIH, y ocupado por las tropas de Naciones Unidas.
    Cuando esas circunstancias cambien -le añadí- ustedes mismos, Lucius, podrán llevarle alimentos de Estados Unidos a Haití.
    El noble y humanitario líder de Pastores por la Paz falleció mes y medio después, el 7 de septiembre, a la edad de 80 años, legando la semilla de su ejemplo a muchos norteamericanos.
    No había aparecido todavía una tragedia adicional: la epidemia del cólera, que el 25 de octubre reportó más de 3 000 casos. A tan dura calamidad se suma que el 5 de noviembre un huracán azotó su territorio, causando inundaciones y el desbordamiento de los ríos.
    Este conjunto de dramáticas circunstancias merece dedicarle la debida atención.
    El cólera apareció por primera vez en la historia moderna en 1817, año en que se produjo una de las grandes pandemias que azotaron a la humanidad en el siglo XIX, que causó gran mortalidad principalmente en la India. En 1826 reincidió la epidemia, invadiendo a Europa, incluyendo a Moscú, Berlín y Londres, extendiéndose a nuestro hemisferio de 1832 a 1839.
    En 1846 se desata una nueva epidemia más dañina todavía, que golpeó a tres continentes: Asia, África, y América. A lo largo del siglo, epidemias que afectaban a esas tres regiones se fueron repitiendo. Sin embargo, en el transcurso de más de 100 años, que comprende casi todo el siglo XX, los países de América Latina y el Caribe se vieron libres de esta enfermedad, hasta el 27 de enero de 1991, en que apareció en el puerto de Chancay, al norte de Perú, que primero se extendió por las costas del Pacífico y después por las del Atlántico, a 16 países; 650 mil personas se enfermaron en un período de 6 años.
    Sin duda alguna, la epidemia afecta mucho más a los países pobres, en cuyas ciudades se aglomeran barrios populosos que muchas veces carecen de agua potable, y las albañales, que son portadoras del vibrión colérico causante de la enfermedad, se mezclan con aquellas.
    En el caso especial de Haití, el terremoto deshizo las redes de una y otra donde estas existían, y millones de personas viven en casas de campaña que muchas veces carecen incluso de letrinas, y todo se mezcla.
    La epidemia que afectó nuestro hemisferio en 1991 fue el vibrión colérico 01, biotipo El Tor, serotipo Ogawa, exactamente el mismo que penetró por Perú aquel año.
    Jon K. Andrus, Director Adjunto de la Organización Panamericana de la Salud, informó que la bacteria presente en Haití era precisamente esa. De ello se derivan una serie de circunstancias a tomar en cuenta, que en el momento oportuno determinarán importantes consideraciones.
    Como se conoce, nuestro país viene formando excelentes médicos haitianos y prestando servicios de salud en ese hermano país desde hace muchos años. Existían problemas en ese campo muy serios y se avanzaba año por año. Nadie podía imaginar, por no existir antecedentes, que se produjera un terremoto que mató a más de 250 mil personas y ocasionó incontables heridos y lesionados. Frente a ese golpe inesperado, nuestros médicos internacionalistas redoblaron sus esfuerzos y se consagraron a su trabajo sin descanso.
    En medio del duro desastre natural, hace apenas un mes se desató la epidemia de cólera con gran fuerza; y como ya expresamos, en tales circunstancias desfavorables se presentó el huracán.
    Ante la gravedad de la situación, la Subsecretaria General de las Naciones Unidas para Asuntos Humanitarios, Valerie Amos, declaró ayer que se necesitaban 350 médicos y 2 000 enfermeras más para hacer frente a la enfermedad.
    La funcionaria llamó a extender la ayuda más allá de Puerto Príncipe, y reveló que los suministros de jabón y de agua limpia solo llegan al 10 por ciento de las familias instaladas fuera de la capital, sin señalar a cuántos llegaban en esa ciudad.
    Diversos funcionarios de Naciones Unidas lamentaron en los últimos días que la respuesta de la comunidad internacional al pedido de ayuda hecho para enfrentar la situación no llegaba al 10% de los 164 millones de dólares solicitados con urgencia.
    Amos reclamó una reacción rápida y urgente para evitar la muerte de más seres humanos a causa del cólera, informó una agencia de noticias.
    Otra agencia comunicó hoy que la cifra de haitianos muertos se eleva ya a 1 523 personas, 66 mil 593 han sido atendidas, y más de un millón de habitantes siguen durmiendo en las plazas públicas.
    Casi el 40% de los enfermos han sido atendidos por los integrantes de la Brigada Médica Cubana, que cuenta con 965 médicos, enfermeros y técnicos que han logrado reducir el número de muertes a menos de 1 por cada 100. Con ese nivel de atención el número de bajas no alcanzaría la cifra de 700. Las personas fallecidas, como norma, estaban extremadamente debilitadas por desnutrición o causas similares. Los niños detectados a tiempo, apenas fallecen.
    Es de suma importancia evitar que la epidemia se extienda a otros países de América Latina y el Caribe, porque en las actuales circunstancias causaría un daño extraordinario a las naciones de este hemisferio.
    Se impone la necesidad de buscar soluciones eficientes y rápidas a la lucha contra esa epidemia.
    Hoy se tomó la decisión por el Partido y el Gobierno de reforzar la Brigada Médica Cubana en Haití con un contingente de la Brigada Henry Reeve, compuesto por 300 médicos, enfermeras y técnicos de la salud, que sumarían más de 1 200 colaboradores.
    Raúl estaba visitando otras regiones del país, e informado en detalle de todo.
    El pueblo de Cuba, el Partido, y el Gobierno, una vez más estarán a la altura de su gloriosa y heroica historia.
    Noviembre 26 de 2010
    9 y 58 p.m.

              Interview with Ceri Dingle, director of “Every Cook Can Govern: The Life, Impact and Works of C.L.R. James”   
    The word went around a few years ago that someone in England was working on a documentary about the West Indian historian, revolutionary political theorist and pan-African eminence C. L. R. James (1901-1989). Like the long-promised dramatic film based on The Black Jacobins, James’s book on the Haitian revolution, this seemed to me an excellent idea — […]
              What’s Cooking on 1060: Philly Gets New Celebrity Chef Restaurant   
    Philadelphia has a new restaurant opened by a 'Top Chef' contestant. The food is refined French-Creole-Haitian cuisine located in the city's Midtown Village neighborhood. 
              Estado del arte de las migraciones que atañen a la República Dominicana 2012   
    Riveros, Natalia.  Estado del arte de las migraciones que atañen a la República Dominicana  2012 / 
    Natalia Riveros. -- Santo Domingo : Observatorio Migrantes del Caribe, 2013. -- 141 p. ; 27cm. [RD 304.82 R621e].

    Haitianos en República Dominicana / Haitianos en Brasil / Dominicanos en Estados Unidos / República Dominicana - Emigración e inmigración, 2012 / República Dominicana - Población. - 2012.



              Why Intimacy With God Makes People Want to Follow You   

    What is our story?

    How did we get there?

    Where do we want to end up?

    "that you may walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, pleasing to all, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God" (Col. 1:10).

    "I Live 4 U" means to live a life that brings honor to God. When we obey God in our thoughts, our attitudes, our words, our decisions and our actions, we are fully pleasing Him.

    Your unique, one-of-a kind story can have a significant, life-changing impact on the lives of others. In ministry, I have discovered that a story has great power. The reason is because people connect to the story of our heart. All of us want a story that relates to our lives; we want an example, an illustration and a depiction.

    I strongly believe that there is almost no other element as important as leading by example. The way in which we live our lives vividly and explicitly tells our story.

    Most everyone has heard the saying, "Do as I say, not as I do." What a poor witness this establishes for other people. If we have genuinely accepted Jesus Christ into our life, it becomes evident that a new nature and spirit is working in us. His divine seed produces God's life in us, in such a way, that people don't have to wonder if we are really saved—Our life will give proof of it, making them desire to hear our story.

    Paul makes this idea clear in Philippians 4:9, when he tells the church, "Do those things which you have both learned and received, and heard and seen in me." He is clear that his whole life is a living illustration of the power of intimacy with Christ. The gospel influenced Paul's messages and lifestyle. There were no hidden areas in his life. Jesus transformed him dramatically with a purpose. The purpose was that Paul's life would serve as a living demonstration of the power of the Spirit in the human heart.

    When someone's life is changed through intimacy with God, their heart is fueled with a passion that unlocks their story. There is something relatable about these kinds of people. We identify with their lives and embrace their stories.

    As we surrender our thoughts, emotions and works of the flesh to the sanctifying power of the Holy Spirit, we become a worthy vessel for the work of God's kingdom. Our lives are to be an illustration, leading by example. We are to think like God, act like God and possess a non-tolerant life-style towards sin that encourages people to connect with Jesus Christ.

    People believe when they see something tangible, and they are encouraged when our life story continues to grow in Christ and depict His Spirit's transformational power.

    Is your life a witness of the power of intimacy? 

    Is the gospel transforming you?  

    Are you living a life of obedience that honors God?

    1. "I live 4 U": opens our heart to intimacy and connecting with God.

    2. "I live 4 U": moves our life to be inspired by faith and expectation.

    3. "I Live 4 U": inspires our thoughts to be informed in order to grow.

    4. "I live 4 U": shares our story with others to be an illustration of honoring God. {eoa}

    Mikel French has challenged "Spiritual Awakening" all across America, where many celebrations extended into multiple weeks and has conducted celebrations in France, Sweden, Russia, Romania, Poland, Ukraine, Moldova, Serbia, Germany, South Africa, Malawi, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Haiti, Japan, Singapore, India and Thailand. He conducted an outreach celebration in Manila, Philippines, reaching 200,000 teenagers with The Book of Hope. Through the generous support of partners, he has presented the message of Jesus Christ to millions of people in the nation of Russia through televised citywide Soul-Winning Celebrations. Mikel considers it an honor to assist in conducting the Annual Pastor's Conference, where thousands of pastors from Russia's 11 time zones come for training, teaching and equipping. Mikel and his wife, Marsha, reside in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    Rebecca Moore contributed to this article.


              Arm Yourself With These Scriptural Truths to Overcome Life's Biggest Challenges   

    Genuine intimacy begins and ends with these four short words: "I Live 4 U."

    "I Live 4 U" opens our heart to intimacy and connecting with God.

    "I Live 4 U" moves our life to be inspired by faith and expectation.

    "I Live 4 U" inspires us to be filled with the Word, informed in order to grow.

    How can we expect God to fulfill His promises in our lives if we don't know what His promises are? The only way to know God's promises is through the revelation of God's Word to our hearts.

    "But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To him be glory, both now and forever. Amen" (2 Pet. 3:18).

    My prayer for you today as you read this is that as God's heart and intimacy is experienced in your life that the following 16 truths of God's Word will form Christ's character in you to function with strength and energy.

    Today and every day this week I want you to read and declare these 16 promises of God's Word over your life:

    I CAN:

    "I can do all things because of Christ who strengthens me" (Phil. 4:13).

    NO LACK:

    "But my God shall supply your every need according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus" (Phil 4:19).

    NO FEAR:

    "For God has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and love, and self-control" (2 Tim. 1:7).

    "As God has dealt to each one a measure of faith" (Rom. 12:3, NKJV).

    NO WEAKNESS:

    "... the Lord is the strength of my life" (Ps. 27:1, MEV).

    "The people who know their God will be strong and take action" (Dan. 11:32).

    NO SUPREMACY OF SATAN OVER MY LIFE:

    "For he who is in you is greater than he who is in the world (1 John 4:4b).

    NO DEFEAT:

    "[For] God .. always causes us to triumph in Christ" (2 Cor. 2:14b).

    NO LACK OF WISDOM:

    "But because of Him you are in Christ Jesus, whom God made unto us wisdom ..." (1 Cor. 1:30).

    NO SICKNESS:

    "... by his stripes we are healed" (Is. 53:5b).

    "He Himself took our infirmities and bore our sicknesses" (Matt. 8:17b).

    NO WORRIES & FRUSTRATIONS:

    "Cast all your care upon Him, because He cares for you" (1 Pet. 5:7). In Christ, I am "care-free."

    NO BONDAGE:

    "And where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty" (2 Cor. 3:17).

    "There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus" (Rom. 8:1b).

    I am in Christ; therefore, I am free from condemnation.

    NO LONELINESS:

    [Jesus said,] "And remember, I am with you always, even to the end of the age" (Matt. 28:20b).

    "I will never leave you, nor forsake you" (Heb. 13:5b).

    NO CURSES OR BAD LUCK:

    "Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law by being made a curse for us—as it is written, "Cursed is everyone who hangs on a tree"... so that the blessing of Abraham might come on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ, that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith" (Gal. 3:13a, 14b).

    NO DISCONTENTMENT:

    "... for I have learned in whatever state I am to be content" (Phil. 4:11).

    NO UNWORTHINESS:

    "God made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him" (2 Cor. 5:21).

    I am excited about declaring these 16 awesome truths of God's Word over your life this week.

    "I Live 4 U." {eoa}

    Mikel French has challenged "Spiritual Awakening" all across America, where many celebrations extended into multiple weeks, and has conducted celebrations in France, Sweden, Russia, Romania, Poland, Ukraine, Moldova, Serbia, Germany, South Africa, Malawi, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Haiti, Japan, Singapore, India and Thailand. He conducted an outreach celebration in Manila, Philippines reaching 200,000 teenagers with The Book of Hope. Through the generous support of partners, he has presented the message of Jesus Christ to millions of people in the nation of Russia through televised citywide Soul-Winning Celebrations. Mikel considers it an honor to assist in conducting The Annual Pastor's Conference, where thousands of pastors from Russia's 11 time zones come for training, teaching and equipping. Mikel and his wife, Marsha, reside in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    Rebecca Moore contributed to this article.


              Your Limitless Source of Holy Inspiration and Uncontaminated Wonder   

    God is calling every believer to a life of uncontaminated wonder where the power of contamination from sin has been broken. Jesus said that the pure in heart are the ones who will see God (Matt. 5:8). Intimacy opens our spiritual eyes so we understand who God is and who we are. The beauty of Christ captivates our spiritual eyes.

    We started writing last week on intimacy. We talked about how the word can be analyzed from a perspective of "into me see." Through intimacy, we look into God's heart of love as He looks into us. For this reason ,intimacy is transformational. God's heart for connection inspires us to embrace the intimacy for His supernatural transformation.

    Another way of saying this is that intimacy leads to purity. Many people think their impurity disqualifies them from intimacy. This is a great lie from the enemy. The unconditional love that we experience through intimacy inspires us towards holiness. We desire to be like Christ as our lives are filled with His presence. Without trying, we are inspired to be conformed to the likeness of Christ (Rom. 8:29).

    Purity is essential for spiritual revelation. Hebrews 12:14 says that without holiness no one will see the Lord. Yet, this isn't a holiness based on our own merits; this is holiness based on the person of Christ abiding inside of us as we hunger and thirst to be intimate with Him. The more we see Him, the more we are inspired to see Him. The more we experience His love, the more we yearn to experience His love.

    Our role is to cooperate with the Holy Spirit. Each and every morning when we awaken, we should cultivate a desire to know, grow and learn, allowing eagerness, fearlessness and intensity for Christ's presence and Word to consume our heart and mind. Intimacy produces expectation in our lives.

    Expect to experience God's extraordinary mercies and rich love every morning, afternoon and night. Be encouraged and energized to see what the new day brings in every aspect of your life. There is nothing so wonderful as a life inspired by faith. I believe we are to live expectant lives!

    Inspire in its root meaning is; "to breathe, to blow in." Perhaps, its simplest meaning is; "to impart a truth or an idea to someone." Intimacy positions us close enough to His heart for Him to breath these truths into our souls.

    His word becomes the fuel for holy inspiration. This Scripture is one of my favorite promises:

    For he says, "In an acceptable time I have listened to you, and in the day of salvation I have helped you.' Look, now is the accepted time; look, now is the day of salvation" (2 Cor. 6:2).

    This tells me that a life of faith and favor is God's idea. It is experienced as we connect with Jesus in intimacy. The privilege of being called by the Holy Spirit to inspire and invite others into a life of faith and favor through Jesus Christ is extraordinary. The Word of God comes alive in our lives.

    As believers when we trust and obey what His Word imparts in us, we activate our purpose and function with energy and vitality. His Word is the foundation to inspire us.

    This week, experience His Word, His life, His breath as your heart is inspired to seek His heart. {eoa}

    Mikel French has challenged spiritual awakening all across America, where many celebrations extended into multiple weeks, and has conducted celebrations in France, Sweden, Russia, Romania, Poland, Ukraine, Moldova, Serbia, Germany, South Africa, Malawi, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Haiti, Japan, Singapore, India and Thailand. He conducted an outreach celebration in Manila, Philippines reaching 200,000 teenagers with The Book of Hope. Through the generous support of partners, he has presented the message of Jesus Christ to millions of people in the nation of Russia through televised citywide Soul-Winning Celebrations. Mikel considers it an honor to assist in conducting The Annual Pastor's Conference, where thousands of pastors from Russia's 11 time zones come for training, teaching and equipping. Mikel and his wife, Marsha, reside in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    Rebecca Moore contributed to this article.


              God Has Forsaken the Republican Party   
    From The Washington Post -- August 21, 2012:

    Signs of divine intervention for Republicans?

    By Dana Milbank

    Has God forsaken the Republican Party?

    Well, sit in judgment of what’s happened in the past few days:

    ●A report comes out that a couple dozen House Republicans engaged in an alcohol-induced frolic, in one case nude, in the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus is believed to have walked on water, calmed the storm and, nearby, turned water into wine and performed the miracle of the loaves and fishes.

    ●Rep. Todd Akin, Missouri’s Republican nominee for Senate, suggests there is such a thing as “legitimate rape” and purports that women’s bodies have mysterious ways to repel the seed of rapists. He spends the next 48 hours rejecting GOP leaders’ demands that he quit the race.

    ●Weather forecasts show that a storm, likely to grow into Hurricane Isaac, may be chugging toward . . . Tampa, where Republicans will open their quadrennial nominating convention on Monday.

    Coincidence? Or part of some Intelligent Design?

    By their own logic, Republicans and their conservative allies should be concerned that Isaac is a form of divine retribution. Last year, Rep. Michele Bachmann, then a Republican presidential candidate, said that the East Coast earthquake and Hurricane Irene — another “I” storm, but not an Old Testament one — were attempts by God “to get the attention of the politicians.” In remarks later termed a “joke,” she said: “It’s time for an act of God and we’re getting it.”

    The influential conservative broadcaster Glenn Beck said last year that the Japanese earthquake and tsunami were God’s “message being sent” to that country. A year earlier, Christian broadcaster and former GOP presidential candidate Pat Robertson tied the Haitian earthquake to that country’s “pact to the devil.”

    Previously, Robertson had argued that Hurricane Katrina was God’s punishment for abortion, while the Rev. John Hagee said the storm was God’s way of punishing homosexuality. The late Jerry Falwell thought that God allowed the Sept. 11 attacks as retribution for feminists and the ACLU.

    Even if you don’t believe God uses meteorological phenomena to express His will, it’s difficult for mere mortals to explain what is happening to the GOP just now.

    By most earthly measures, President Obama has no business being reelected. No president since World War II has won reelection with the unemployment rate north of 7.4 percent. Of the presidents during that time who were returned to office, GDP growth averaged 4.7 percent during the first nine months of the election year — more than double the current rate.

    But instead of being swept into office by the worst economic recovery since the Great Depression, Republicans are in danger of losing an election that is theirs to lose. Mitt Romney, often tone-deaf, has allowed Obama to change the subject to Romney’s tax havens and tax returns. And congressional Republicans are providing all kinds of reasons for Americans to doubt their readiness to assume power.

    The Politico report Sunday about drunken skinny-dipping in the Sea of Galilee gave House Republicans an unwanted image of debauchery — a faint echo of the Capitol page scandal that, breaking in September 2006, cemented Republicans’ fate in that November’s elections. The 30 Republican lawmakers on the “fact-finding” mission to Israel last summer earned a rebuke from Majority Leader Eric Cantor and attracted the attention of the FBI. The naked congressman, Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-Kan.), admitted in a statement: “[R]egrettably I jumped into the water without a swimsuit.”

    A boozy frolic at a Christian holy site might have been a considerable embarrassment for the party, but it was eclipsed by a bigger one: Akin’s preposterous claim on a St. Louis TV program that pregnancy is rare after a “legitimate rape” because “the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down.”

    Republican leaders spent the next 48 hours trying to shut Akin’s whole thing down, but after a period of panic (a no-show on Piers Morgan’s show led the CNN host to show his empty chair and call him a “gutless little twerp”), Akin told radio host Mike Huckabee on Tuesday that he would fight the “big party people” and stay in the race.

    The big party people had a further complication: In Tampa on Tuesday, those drafting the GOP platform agreed to retain a plank calling for a constitutional amendment banning abortion without specifying exceptions for cases of rape. In other words, the Akin position.

    For a party that should be sailing toward victory, there were all the makings of a perfect storm. And, sure enough: Tuesday afternoon, the National Weather Service forecast that “Tropical Depression Nine” would strengthen into a hurricane, taking a northwesterly track over Cuba on Sunday morning — just as Republicans are arriving in Florida.

    What happens next? God only knows.
              An Enlightened American Businessman Says: "What I Built -- With Government Help"   
    From The Washington Post -- August 17, 2012:

    What I built — with government help

    By James C. Roumell, Published: August 17

    James C. Roumell founded Roumell Asset Management LLC.

    I was born in Detroit in 1961 and grew up in a working-class neighborhood just south of the famed 8 Mile Road. My block was stable; most of the fathers of my friends worked in the auto plants. In 1968 my parents divorced and my mother, armed with a high school degree, was thrust into the workforce. We were taken out of our Catholic school and moved into public schools. Dinner was often breakfast foods, which was fine with us. Mom is still a great cook.

    Today, I own a small business, an asset management firm with $300 million in assets. Last year we launched the Roumell Opportunistic Value Fund (RAMSX) and hired three more people. We’re growing and creating jobs. I suppose I could pound my chest and take credit for my journey from Detroit to Chevy Chase, from working class to professional. I could say I built it myself. But this wouldn’t be true.

    In 1967, Detroit’s riots came to our neighborhood and our dry cleaner was burned to the ground. The National Guard was called in, and peace was quickly restored. Mom found a good job with a trucking company and was able to adequately care for our family on a union wage fought for by the Teamsters in an environment supported by the National Labor Relations Act of 1935.

    I went to college with the help of Pell Grants and government loans. Twenty years ago I met Claiborne Pell and was able to thank the former Democratic senator from Rhode Island for introducing the Higher Education Act of 1965, which allowed me to go to college.

    My business has been made possible by the Investment Company Act of 1940 and the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. These laws created practices and transparency that enabled a financial services industry to emerge. After the stock market collapse of 1929, the public rightly did not trust Wall Street and needed assurances that the industry would operate within a reliable set of rules.

    Nothing in terms of “regulations” or “business uncertainty” has stopped me from investing capital for a return. In fact, the stability that government involvement brought to the capital markets over the past three years, evidenced by a 100 percent increase in the Standard and Poor’s 500-stock index since March 2009, probably enabled my business to survive. The federal government’s back-stopping of money market funds in the fall of 2008 ended, effectively in one day, what was turning into a 1930s-style bank run.

    Of course, I worked hard. As a boy I delivered newspapers and cut grass. In high school I was a short-order cook, landscaper and factory worker. I entered the financial services industry in 1986, and in 1992 I struck out on my own with a new baby and little savings. I learned what a panic attack was, for sure.

    I did work harder, and perhaps more imaginatively, than many colleagues. But does that mean I built it myself? Does it diminish my success to be grateful for the public investments that so clearly contributed to my success? Every successful person knows, and will admit if he is honest, that luck played a role in his good fortune.

    The countries that spend the least on government as a percentage of their economy (gross domestic product) are countries with little business success. Haiti, Bangladesh and Afghanistan spend 16, 13 and 9 percent of their GDP, respectively. Our federal government has spent around 20 percent of GDP since World War II. Europe typically spends slightly over 50 percent, so we’re a long way off even after factoring in an additional 15 percent for state and local government spending.

    To be clear, I’m not suggesting that the United States pursue a European economic model. My story, in fact, probably would not have happened in most European countries.

    I’m a businessman with little patience for waste, fraud and abuse. On a daily basis I ask, “What’s the return?” No common-sensical person wants capital to be poorly allocated. This country needs long-term entitlement reform, and we have to more evenly match spending to revenue.

    Last year I paid 22.6 percent in federal taxes after all the special deductions afforded me. That’s a pretty darn low effective rate by historical standards, and it’s low for all I receive from this country. My business depends on a country that continues to make savvy investments in its infrastructure, in its oversight of industry and in its people. Those public investments are instrumental to private market growth.

    I’m proud of my accomplishments and of my grandparents’ decision to immigrate to America. My success, however, is the result of many factors, and remaining conscious of and grateful for those contributions seems the decent thing to do. Also, how can I not support the next generation of working-class kids who dream of moving into America’s middle and upper class?

    Let us have a real debate about the costs and benefits of government spending programs. The attitude that smugly denigrates the public sphere while applauding the private one is misguided.

              A Cancun Les chanceliers haïtien et mexicain révisent la coopération entre les deux pays   
    Antonio Rodrigue d'Haiti pour Haiti et Luis Videgarray Caso du Mexique se sont entretenus juste un mois après la bilatérale entre les deux présidents Nieto
              re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean   
    Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
              The girl truck   
    LAKELAND, FL - I was really surprised to hear from my new trainer less than 24 hours after my last one dropped me in Ohio, and even more surprised that it was a woman. Melissa came in all tight jeans and feathered bangs, straight out of the 80s. I got on the truck that evening, we picked up a load in Toledo and rushed down to Miami, where it had to be on Friday morning. In the course of that rushed 30-hour stretch during which the truck never really stopped moving, I learned a lot of things about my new trainer. For instance, the man she calls her "husband" is really her long-distance boyfriend, even though she's still married to someone else and so is he. Also, that her stalker ex-boyfriend likes to text message her with marriage proposals. That she will curse out other truck drivers, then get on the CB and be sweet as pie to them. Also, that she has no teeth, which is helpful to her anorexia.

    Just when I was starting to adore her trashy awesomeness (or maybe her awesome trashiness), we arrived in Miami. I'd never been to Florida before, and the rest of the state really did not impress me, but there was something about Miami that enchanted me instantly - something about the security guards with Haitian accents, and the fresh fruit and Cuban desserts on the roach coach that pulled up to the dock where we were waiting to unload the trailer, the brightness and glitter of early morning shining with this delicious cultural twist. After too much time in the monotone of the Midwest, it was the perfect city flavor to land on my tongue.

    And just as I was relishing the taste of Miami morning, Melissa set in with a long and involved tirade about how this part of her home state is now full of black and Hispanic people, and how much she hates both, complete with long and bone-chillingly racist reasons why. It was then that I noticed the small confederate flag sticker on her CB radio. Oy.

    I've kept my mouth shut so far. Except for the awful, blatant racism, I like her a lot. We get along. She's a good driver, and a good teacher - at least for me, it seems. My last trainer was a good driver too, as well as a licensed mechanic, and he was constantly appalled at all the things I didn't know about how trucks and other vehicles function, and tried to make me feel bad for not knowing things I don't know, which is bullshit. Melissa, on the other hand, breaks things down into terms I understand. And her truck is a lot easier to handle and shift than the last one I was on, though technically it's a lot older and crappier. I'm going to chalk that one up to female energy.

    I asked me why she became a truck driver, and she told me the story of how she went to visit her grandfather in Wisconsin at the age of 8. He was a driver, and had an ancient cab-over truck. She sat in a lawn chair in the space generally reserved for a passenger seat and looked at the countryside they were passing through, so high up above everything, moving so fast. It was one of the big defining moments of her life. She told him then, "One day, Grandpa, I'm going to drive a truck just like you." He replied, "Over my dead body, you will." But he changed his mind once he saw her behind the wheel, she said.

    One thing I really like is the difference I feel between walking into a truck stop or shipper's office with another woman rather than a man. With my last trainer, everyone assumed I was his wife or girlfriend, and always addressed him first, assuming he was in charge of the truck - which was true, obviously, but not for those reasons. I always felt self-conscious during those moments, and angry at the assumptions, but powerless against them since I am "just a student." With Melissa, it feels more like equal footing. Other drivers and the company's customers don't know which one of us to address first, and they get confused, and it's fantastic to see the looks on people's faces as they slowly realize that no, there are no men on that truck. Right now, I am spending my energy trying to somehow get past the racism so I can mine this woman for writing material.

    She is taking home time this weekend, and I get to stay in a hotel. Unlike my last trainer, she will actually pick me back up after the weekend is over. The hotel is near our company terminal in the Tampa area. I considered renting a car or something and going exploring, but I've been on the road for nearly a month and nothing seems as wonderful as indulging as sleeping in a hotel bed and lounging by the pool for a couple days. Especially since my birthday is tomorrow.

    Also, just as a note about how I've been living - I haven't had a shower, proper meal, or a chance to sleep longer than two hours at a stretch since Ohio. I am a dirty, hungry, and tired girl, yet what do I do first upon checking into my hotel room? I check my email and update my blog. Priorities are priorities, after all.
              re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean   
    Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
               UN agrees to cut peacekeeping budget, a reduction US sought    
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The General Assembly on Friday agreed to a significant cut in the budget for the U.N.'s far-flung peacekeeping missions, a reduction that the Trump administration fought hard to achieve though it wanted an even larger decrease. After lengthy and heated negotiations, the assembly's powerful budget committee agreed to a $7.3 billion budget for 14 peacekeeping missions for the year starting July 1, a $570 million cut from the current budget of $7.87 billion. The peacekeeping mission in Liberia, established in 2003 to support implementation of a cease-fire agreement, is wrapping up its operations next year. The Security Council created a small follow-on peacekeeping mission for an initial period of six months comprising 1,275 police officers who will continue training Haiti's national police force.
              'Revolutionary' Unemployment: A Crime   
    'Revolutionary' Unemployment: A Crime
    ROBERTO ÁLVAREZ QUIÑONES | Los Ángeles | 30 de Junio de 2017 - 10:04 CEST.

    The Cuban Government always lies in its economic and social statistics,
    and with total impunity, as no figures can actually be verified. It
    began to lie at the beginning of 1960, when the president of the
    National Bank of Cuba, Che Guevara, fumed upon finding out that the
    growth of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 1959 had not reached 1%,
    so he forced his economists to look for other methods to calculate it in
    order too boost it and burnish the Revolution's image.

    Of all the statistical data offered today by the regime's National
    Office of Statistics and Information (ONEI), perhaps the most
    outrageously false is the unemployment rate, which it claims was 2,4% in
    2016.

    However, when Cuba was selected as a member of the Governing Body of the
    International Labour Organization (ILO) for the 2017-2020 period, the
    ONEI was obliged to inform the ILO that of the seven million people of
    working age in Cuba, 4,9 million have work, and the other 2,1 million
    are jobless.

    This gives us an actual unemployment rate of 30%, one of the highest in
    the world, and the second highest in the Americas, behind only Haiti.
    But the regime does not admit this to Cubans, lest it admit it to
    itself. Castro's propaganda spreads the myth that there is no
    unemployment in Cuba because it is a Marxist-Leninist country, and the
    scourge of unemployment is a trait of the "decadent" capitalist system.

    Of course, the numbers don't lie. There are more than two million people
    of working age who are unemployed and must scramble just to survive. The
    worst thing is that the vast majority of them are young people. They
    comprise Castroism/Guevarism's "new man." There is no greater waste in
    the Americas than the most valuable capital a nation possesses.

    A squandering of its most valuable asset

    It is a universally recognized axiom that the main economic and social
    resource a country has is its human capital, the creative capacity of
    its people. This has been the case since the emergence of homo sapiens –
    except in the Communist regimes of the 20th century, and into the 21st,
    under which private property to produce goods and services constitutes a
    heresy punished by the law.

    Such is the case in Cuba. The Castroist state was able to maintain more
    or less acceptable levels of employment, as long as it had substantial
    subsidies from Moscow. But it was all a deck of cards. Workplaces were
    inevitably and dramatically overstaffed. There was always room for one
    more worker, even if he was not necessary, if he was a friend of someone
    employed there.

    When the Soviet Union collapsed, Venezuelan subsidies proved
    insufficient to maintain these levels of unproductiveness, with more
    than 1,5 million state employees doing little or no work at all. Thus,
    the "Updating of the Socialist Economic Model" became necessary, which,
    although it remains a thoroughly Statist and Stalinist plan, the whole
    world calls "Raúl Castro's reforms."

    As if he were on the Moon, and not with his feet on the ground, one of
    the first measures announced by the dictator himself, as part of this
    "updating" was the gradual laying off of those 1,5 million surplus
    workers from state payrolls, but without freeing up the productive
    forces of the nation so that a burgeoning private sector could absorb
    that enormous number of unemployed Cubans.

    In the Middle Ages

    That is, the dictatorship behaved as if it were in the Middle Ages,
    granting licenses, on a personal basis, to provide only precarious,
    medieval-like services. It even excluded university professionals, who,
    with their know-how, could have contributed much to the country on their
    own. Logically, within a few months the announced mass dismissal was
    reversed, as it promised to unleash chaos and, probably, destabilize the
    regime.

    Despite the fact that there was no private sector capable of
    assimilating them, tens of thousands of state workers lost their jobs
    anyway due to lack of raw materials in their factories, the closing of
    some, and the reduction of industrial and commercial activity due to the
    recession resulting from the crisis in Venezuela. Many others continue
    to abandon their workplaces on an almost daily basis, because the
    average salary of about 23 dollars is not enough for them to survive and
    support their families, so they prefer to turn to the black market.

    The results are starkly evident. Today the island's parks and streets
    are teeming with men and women of working age. They talk, tell stories
    or play with their dogs.

    Only 155.605 young people are self-employed, which represents 31% of the
    island's incipient private sector. A bit more than a million young
    people work in the state sector, but not for the measly Cuban salary,
    but because they can obtain from the State products that they later sell
    on the black market to survive.

    Oddly enough, stealing from the Cuban state is not a crime, but an act
    of self-defense. Thanks to "missing" goods in state inventories, and the
    "diversion of resources", there exists a genuine national market: the
    underground one, which keeps Cuban families alive and kicking.

    The current 30% unemployment on the island is a reflection of Cuba's
    appallingly unique situation: it is the only country in the hemisphere
    that is today less economically and socially advanced than it was in the
    middle of the 20th century. Though Haiti has a higher unemploymen rate
    than Cuba, its average salary of 59 dollars is double. The
    "Revolutionary" island has not even reached square one when it comes to
    socio-economic progress, and will need to take its first steps before it
    can advance and build a new future.

    Undoubtedly, the reconstruction of the devastated country will fall to
    those young people who today have no jobs, and hang their university
    degrees on the wall, and pedal bicycle taxis, or make a living as human
    statues to get tips from tourists.

    Cubans who are now barred from being successful private entrepreneurs,
    technicians or well-paid employees will be the ones who, with financial
    assistance from international and Cuban banks, and foreign and
    Cuban-American investors, will rebuild the Cuban economy, which before
    the Castroist nightmare was one of the most prosperous in the Americas.
    They will construct the modern, democratic country for which we all yearn.

    Source: 'Revolutionary' Unemployment: A Crime | Diario de Cuba -
    http://www.diariodecuba.com/cuba/1498809898_32228.html
              Comment on Haitian Christmas, 101: Drinking Cremas with Wyclef by دانلود قسمت هشتم شهرزاد دوم   
    <strong>Title</strong> [...]Every once in a whilst we opt for blogs that we read. Listed beneath would be the most current websites that we pick out [...]
              Advocacy And Communications Coordinator - Haiti   
    , and dignity for all. With this goal, the advocacy and communications coordinator will work with MCC partners, MCCs advocacy... and long-term change, and to work to create effective communications strategies. The worker will need to have...
              Technical Specialist 10/ Technical Manager / Coordinator - Haiti   
    and disease prevention, health finance, and health systems management. Our impact is felt in policies that ensure healthcare... solutions. Opportunity Abt Associates seeks a qualified Technical Manager / Coordinator to support the implementation...
              Advocacy And Communications Coordinator - Haiti   
    . Many legal documents, most newspapers and journals, and many TV and radio stations are in French. Since Creole is spoken...
              Advocacy And Communications Coordinator - Haiti   
    today. He/She will use creative, multi-platform storytelling to amplify communication of the barriers, challenges and solutions... concrete advocacy actions to support MCC partners in Haiti. The worker should be a creative, self-starter who can...
              Advocacy And Communications Coordinator - Haiti   
    and small trucks), and there are buses that travel between the main cities. Public transportation in Haiti is generally...
              Advocacy And Communications Coordinator - Haiti   
    is also a large international population composed of development workers, missionaries, businesspersons and government personnel... language spoken by all Haitians, but French is often used in government offices and schools and preferred by the...
              T&TVF short $175,000 for CAZOVA champs   
    Published: 
    Saturday, July 1, 2017

    With T&T Volleyball Federation set to host the Senior Caribbean Zonal Volleyball Association (CAZOVA) Championship from Tuesday until next Sunday July 9, the Local Organising Committee (LOC) headed by Dion Hutchinson has admitted to being $175,000 short of meeting its demands.

    Hutchinson, also a T&TVF Executive Director was speaking at the Cascadia Hotel & Conference Centre, Cascade, St Ann’s at the launch of the eight-team tournament which comes off at the National Cycling Centre, in Balmain, Couva.

    During his brief address, Hutchinson said the T&TVF was 80 percent ready for the event, which is being held in T&T for the second time in three years, with the help of CAZOVA president and former T&TVF boss Mushtaque Mohammed as well as the Ministry of Sports, which have so far assisted with transportation for two teams via two maxi-taxis.

    He added, “We have managed to put together 25 percent of the budget which we are very grateful for but we are still out by $175,000 and the tournament is a few days away, and immediately after this launch I will be heading back to the Ministry of Sports to seek their assistance.”

    “We have already secured two maxis, but we are still short of money to cover for transport for the six other teams and tournament officials as well as payment for referees, staff members and scorers for the duration of the tournament.

    With regards to the tournament itself, Hutchinson said the CAZOVA Championship being staged at Couva will be a big one in itself, and he

    hopes the general public come out and show their support to the athletes and mainly the home team.

    “Some of our players were recently in Suriname for a tournament which would have no doubt helot to get them match ready and the team is a very balanced one with a lot of experience players and youth at the same time and we at the T&TVF expect the team to do well.”

    Mohammed echoed the views of Hutchinson stating being a national of T&T its always pleasing to him for we host these types of events as its normally of a very high standard.

    “We at CAZOVA are always ready to assist the LOC’s of the host country in making sure a well run tournament is hosted and we are very confident that this will take place over the next week-and-a-half at Couva.”

    Looking ahead to the tournament, Mohammed pointed out that this edition of the CAZOVA Championship is using a new qualification format for the NORCECA Continental Grand Prix as well as the FIVB World Championship.

    Defending champions and two-time winners, T&T will come up against 2008 winner Martinique, Curacao and Jamaica in Pool E while former winners, Bahamas and Barbados, debutants Haiti and Suriname are in Pool D.

    At the end of the round-robin series, the top two teams from each group will advance straight to the semifinals, while the second and third placed team will meet in cross-over semifinals.

    When the competition concludes on July 9, the top two teams overall will qualify to the Third Round of FIVB World Championship qualification while the winner also be crowned champions of CAZOVA.

    Both finalists at CAZOVA will also book tickets to the NORCECA Continental where they will join USA, Cuba, Canada, Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and Guatemala, along with two from the Eastern Caribbean Zonal Volleyball Association (ECVA) in the top-12 qualification process to determine the eventual five qualifiers to the FIVA World Championships.

    In addition to T&T, and Martinique, Bahamas (2012), perennial kings and record nine-time winner Barbados (1992-1996, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006) and Netherlands Antilles (1991) are the other past winners.

    The T&T 12-man squad will be led by former France-based Glamorgan-spiker in their quest for a third crown and he will have as his vice-captain, former Finland-based Akim Bushe while the second vice-captain Russell Pena was forced to withdraw from the team earlier this week due to injury and was replaced by Nathaniel Noreiga.

    T&T senior men’s volleyball team

    Ryan Stewart (captain), Akim Bushe (vice-captain), Mikheil Hoyte, Kameron Donald, Nathaniel Noreiga, Marlon Phillip, Brandon Legall, Adriel Roberts Joshua Mohammed, Daneil Williams, Enrique Harry, Kwesi Daniel.

     

    Venue: National Cycling Centre, Balmain, Couva:

    July 2 - 9, 2017:

    Pool D: Martinique, Suriname, T&T, Curacao

    Pool E: Jamaica, Haiti, Barbados, Bahamas

     

    Tournament Schedule

    Tuesday

    Martinique vs Suriname, 2pm

    Jamaica vs Haiti, 4pm

    Opening Ceremony, 6pm

    Barbados vs Bahamas, 7pm

    T&T vs Curacao, 9pm

     

    Wednesday

    Curacao vs Martinique, 2pm

    Bahamas vs Jamaica, 4pm

    Barbados vs Haiti, 7pm

    T&T vs Suriname, 9pm

     

    Thursday

    Suriname vs Curacao, 2pm

    Bahamas vs Haiti, 4pm

    Barbados vs Jamaica, 7pm

    T&T vs Martinique, 9pm

     

    Friday

    Playoffs

    Seventh spot: 4D vs 4E, 2pm

    Quarterfinal 1: 2E vs 3D, 5pm

    Quarterfinal 2: 2D vs 3E, 7pm

     

    Saturday

    Fifth spot: Loser Quarterfinal 1 vs Loser Quarterfinal 2, 2pm

    Semifinal 1: E1 vs Quarterfinal winner 1 or 2, 5pm

    Semifinal 2: D1 vs Quarterfinal winner 1 or 2, 7pm

     

    Sunday

    Third place: Loser Semifinal 1 vs Loser Semifinal 2, 2pm

    Final: Winner Semifinal 1 vs Winner Semifinal 2, 4pm

    Awards ceremony, 6pm

    VOLLEYBAL TALK Diana Espinoza, left, Sean Morrison, the T&T Head Coach, Mushtaque Mohammed President of Cazova, Deon Hutchinson of the T&T Volleyball Federation Jamie Hutchinson and Ryan Stewart, the T&T men's team captain, interact after the Press conference at the Cascadia Hotel St Ann's, yesterday .

              SOLDES 2017   

    La période des SOLDES est arrivée : dans ma Boutique aussi de nombreux articles sont soldés.
    Quelques exemples en photos, mais n'hésitez pas à aller "fouiner", vous trouverez peut-être votre bonheur !

    Si un article vous plaît et que vous souhaitiez que je vous le confectionne en le personnalisant ( si j'ai les fournitures en stock ! ) n'hésitez pas, vous pouvez me contacter via "contacter l'auteur" à droite de la page du blog ou encore par Facebook ou dans ma Boutique en ligne.

    20161224_140928

    20161025_170808

    20161102_162849

    CIMG2652

    CIMG2859

    CIMG1789

    CIMG1801

     

    CIMG2545

    CIMG2447

    CIMG2446

    CIMG2125

    CIMG2037

    CIMG2276

     


              Quelques articles pour enfants ...    

    Je vous joins quelques articles pour enfants fabriqués pour cette fin d'année : snood bien chaud en polaire et coton, doudou, bavoir et coussins. Certains sont vendus, d'autres sont en vente dans ma Boutique en ligne ou en direct à mon atelier, si vous voulez venir, contactez-moi.  A présent il faut penser aux nouvelles collections, je ne manquerai pas de vous tenir au courant...

    Si un article vous plaît et que vous souhaitiez que je vous le confectionne, n'hésitez pas, vous pouvez me contacter via "contacter l'auteur" à droite de la page du blog ou encore par Facebook ou dans ma Boutique en ligne.

    A très bientôt !

    20161207_085444

    CIMG2897

    20161015_112142

     

    20160926_143332


              Calendar For June 30 – July 7, 2017   
    Saturday, July 1 • The fourth annual Palm Beach Haitian Fest will take place Saturday, July 1 and Sunday, July 2 at the South Florida Fairgrounds Expo Center. For more info., visit www.palmbeachhaitianfest.com. • The Loxahatchee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association will walk about four miles in John Prince Park (2520 Lake Worth Road, […]
              Brujo de brujos, amarres de amor-Pactos. BRUJOS PROFESIONALES DEL VUDU HAITIANO -    
    Maestro Sebastian, poderoso brujo llanero, el unico que no pide dinero adelantado, no cobra la consulta ni pide dinero para materiales. Servicios que presto:1. ...
              PAMM Inside|Out North Miami Beach Art in the Dark    

    PAMM Inside|Out is on view through September 2017 in the Miami-Dade County communities of Biscayne Park, Opa-Locka and Overtown in the spring and Little Haiti, North Miami Beach and Surfside in the summer. For full schedule of events, visit pamm.org/insideout.

    Inside Out Logo

    Undefined
    Date and Time: 
    07/20/2017 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
    Location: 
    16711 W. Dixie Hwy North Miami Beach, FL 33160
    Contact: 
    education@pamm.org Free and open the the public
    Add to LED Wall Image Feed: 
    Wall Date: 
    Friday, June 30, 2017 - 12:00pm to Saturday, July 1, 2017 - 12:00pm

              Slay suspect in court after years on lam   

    A dozen relatives of two slain sisters packed a Dorchester courtroom to see the man accused of the killings finally face justice after being on the run for six years.

    Jean Weevins Janvier, 35, was caught in Haiti last month and pleaded not guilty in Suffolk Superior Court yesterday to two counts of murder, two counts of armed assault in a dwelling and one count of unlawful possession of a firearm. He is accused of shooting dead Stephanie Emile, 21, and Judith Emile, 23 — sisters who had moved from Haiti eight years before the Nov. 14, 2011, murder to make a better life for themselves in Boston.

    “It’s been tough. I’m glad we’re here today. I’m glad he’s caught. Basically were going to move forward and seek justice for my sisters,” Miralda Emile said outside the courthouse. “It was very very heart-wrenching. It was very hurtful. It was very emotional.”

    The girl who was a toddler at the time she witnessed her aunts’ executions was also in court, as were the parents, Miralda Emile added. “She’s doing well. It’s been a hard road for her. She was young when it happened so she’s still recovering from it. She remembers him. She saw him,” she said. “We’re just here to find justice for Stephanie and Judith. That’s all.”

    Stephanie Emile had a short-lived romance with Janvier. The suspect’s anger at the ending of that relationship is what drove him to kill, Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F. Conley’s Office said.

    Janvier shot Stephanie Emile in the back of the head then turned the gun on her sister, shooting her three times, including once in the forehead, Suffolk County Assistant District Attorney Mark Lee said. The toddler was left in the home, unharmed.

    Janvier was called in for questioning by police that December, and within 48 hours he was on a plane to Haiti, where prosecutors say he remained until June 3 when a task force of island police and federal authorities tracked him down and arrested him at his mother’s home.

    Author(s): 

    Organization

    Boston Herald

    Articles

    Blog Posts

    Source: 
    DTI
    Freely Available: 
    Disable AP title update: 

              Understanding the Adventureland Veranda   
    Late last year the Skipper Canteen opened at Magic Kingdom's Adventureland, a move which this author enthusiastically endorsed. Yet not everyone was as complimentary as I - almost immediately unfavorable comparisons to the Adventurer's Club of Pleasure Island began to emerge. In fact, 2015 was something of a bumper crop year for restaurants being unfavorably compared to the Adventurer's Club, starting with the new Trader Sam's in the Spring, proceeding through Jock Lindsay's Hangar Bar in the Fall, and climaxing with Skipper Canteen in the Winter. This is in spite of the fact that none of these restaurants - to a one - ever announced or attempted any ties to that loudly missed Pleasure Island institution.

    Between Summer 1994 and Winter 2015, an entire generation has passed through Adventureland without stepping foot into the Adventureland Veranda. Pieces of the original layout have been truncated, altered, and removed over time - the shaded verandas which gave the food service location its name did not return, and the most extended seating porches out towards the Breezeway had long been swallowed up by Restrooms.

    And so it is entirely reasonable to expect new visitors to not be fully in the know about exactly what the Adventureland Veranda and the Skipper Canteen represents and, in looking for answers, perhaps did not look to the right places to begin with.


    Adventurer's Club belonged to some time long ago, where there could still theoretically be snooty butlers and French maids. The time period of both the Jungle Cruise and the Club are some ephemeral sense of "pre-World War II"; back then, when theoretically we could expect Indiana Jones,  Rick Blaine, or Groucho's Captain Spaulding persona to rub shoulders at the bar. A time that didn't really exist, but generations of passed on memories from Hollywood thrillers made us want to believe it could have.

    And of course, the Jungle Navigation Company - the fictional proprietors of the Jungle Cruise - were explicitly connected to the Adventurer's Club. Many guests seemingly expected the Canteen to reflect either the Club, which was connected to the Jungle Cruise mythologically, or the Jungle Cruise queue area, connected to the Jungle Cruise physically. Instead, they were served up, in Skipper Canteen, a remade version of something else entirely.

    And don't get me wrong; I applaud Magic Kingdom's decision to honor the original design of the Adventureland Veranda, one of the most richly evocative spaces ever created for a theme park. The trick is, it's been so long that most people aren't even sure what the Veranda was designed to evoke, so to show how retaining the interior makes both good historical and thematic sense, we need to grapple with what the Veranda is supposed to be at all.

    Adventureland: Tracing the Colonial Narrative

    As described in a previous post, Adventureland at Magic Kingdom does follow a specific progression and trace a unified concept, it's just one most observers will never attempt to unpack. We will have to, for the purposes of this essay.

    There are basically four sections to Adventureland, and each structure can be tied to one or another. The Theme of Adventureland is of the encounter between the Western world and far-off places and peoples. This Theme is Visualized through the device of exotic architecture. The Thematic Heart of the area is the Jungle Cruise, the ride the area was designed to complement, where we (modern Americans) may travel into uncharted regions and confront various dangers.

    The First Section is the Jungle. The Jungle represents the untamed wilderness which Adventureland encroaches on. Attractions that belong to the Jungle are the Jungle Cruise and the Swiss Family Treehouse, both representing the concept of "Survival Against the Odds". Both attractions are perched on the edge of the apparently boundless Jungle section. The Thematic Heart of the Jungle Section is the Cambodian Ruins, which represents the notion that all cultures will fail to conquer the wilds of the Jungle and establishes the dominance of this threat.

    The Second Section is the Colonial Area. The Colonists represent the intrusion of Western cultures into forgein lands. The Thematic Heart of the Colonial Section is the Adventureland Veranda. Notice how, when entering from the Hub, that the Colonial Section is directly juxtaposed with the Jungle across the way, an early indication of the main conflict of the area - and setting up the nearby Jungle Cruise.

    The Third Section is what I call the Native Section. The transition occurs at the Adventureland Breezeway where the bathrooms are located, where the architecture switches to rougher earthen walls and strong Moorish influences. This is the civilization which existed in Adventureland before the Colonists arrived, and it appropriately is positioned further in the area, allowing the Victorian touches of the Colonial section and Main Street U.S.A. to transition smoothly. The Thematic Heart of the Native Section is the Balinese Temple that the Enchanted Tiki Room occurs in.

    Let's dwell for a moment on the altered significance of the Tiki Room at Magic Kingdom. At Disneyland, the Tiki Room is designed to reflect a midcentury American tiki restaurant, the likes of which had proliferated across Southern California since the end of the war. That's why it's supposed to be a surprise when the stuffed birds inside come to life. At Magic Kingdom, the Tiki Room is inside a Balinese Temple, an actual house of the Gods. We are told in the pre-show area that the Birds inside can talk as an effect of the "Magical Sunshine Pavilion", i.e. they can speak because they have been blessed by the power of the Gods. Therefore, when the Tiki Gods end the showing of American pop culture by bringing in a storm, it's an actual reflection of their power. In other words, we're lucky they didn't get even angrier. The Colonists don't stand a chance. Or, as Uhoah said, "When you mess with Polynesia, the Tiki Gods will squeeze ya!"

    The Fourth Section is Caribbean Plaza, which comprises Pirates of the Caribbean. The Thematic Heart of the Plaza is the Castillo del Morro, the fortress the pirates attack and overrun in the ride. But the Pirates are intruders as much as the Colonizing Spaniards are, don't forget. Although Pirates of the Caribbean does not dramatize Adventureland's key theme - it's a morality play and thus best paired with The Haunted Mansion - the fact that Caribbean Plaza is executed in Spanish Colonial style, and bookends the Native section of Adventureland with yet another village built by conquerors, both means it feels perfectly at home in Adventureland and allows for a smooth transition into a representation of another area overrun by greedy white men: Latin America and the American Southwest.

    Here's a map of the main area with everything color coded to dramatize the clash of values in Adventureland.



    The Adventureland Veranda: What Is It?

    Okay, now that we know how the Veranda fits into the narrative conveyed by Adventureland's architecture, let's dig into what the darn thing actually is, and we can begin by taking a quick tour of what's represented architecturally here.

    Facing the Hub, we see immediately tile-lined roofs and elaborately shaped details.


    Yes, tile-lined roofs do evoke the Caribbean, and it's an easy leap to make given the elaborately tiled roofs just down the way in Caribbean Plaza, but let's not forget that tile roofs are also traditional in Asia, which helps visually tie the roofline in with this elaborately realized pagoda-esque tower:


    The elaborate scrollwork of the Veranda is unmistakably Victorian in design. We know this because only the Victorians did things like nail intricately scrolled wood on their houses, and they did it because it was brand spanking new and novel. The Scroll Saw that made the production of these pieces possible was not created until the Industrial Revolution, which meant you could now cheaply produce things which once would've required a skilled artisan. The Victorians loved that stuff, which is why we can instantly recognize the intricate but mass produced "gingerbread" of Main Street USA as Victorian.

    We also see elaborately designed railings...


    ..intricate woodwork...


    ...promenading balconies and painted steel or tin roofs. Corrugated steel, again, being a product of the Industrial Revolution, making it possible to date our structure definitively to late in the 19th century.


    So now the trick is to narrow down what sort of tropical architecture has all of these features. One easy place to search for inspiration is Hawaii, which had effectively been annexed by the United States for decades before it was made an official part of the union following World War II. It's easy to see the similarities to structures built in Hawaii to house workers and owners on sugar plantations:


    But it's easy and tempting to conflate the merely tropical with a direct source. The tin roof, peaked architecture, bright colors and charming porch recall the Veranda closely, but what of the Asian elements? The same historical location in Hawaii, the Plantation Village in Waipahu, has a temple built for Chinese laborers that looks like even more of a smoking gun:


    But let's keep looking before we jump to any conclusions. It gets into tricky territory if you want to claim that Hawaii was ever "colonized" - issues that a Disney blog and this unlearned author would be best to avoid. We are in the "Colonial Section", and if the more Asian the designs get the closer we seem to the Veranda, then we need to question which European powers maintain colonies in Asia. And when we ask that, the range narrows considerably: Britain and France.

    How about India? The entrance to the Veranda has this highly atmospheric punkah, redolent of tropical climes and the Indian subcontinent.


    Punkahs spread with the English out of British East India during their colonial era, spreading west to Europe.


    But there isn't much else you can point to in the Veranda that seems especially British or Indian in design. Punkah became especially popular in the American South among the richest landowners, and those who operated punkah is where we still derive our pejorative "coolie". Dixie Landings/Port Orleans Riverside's lobby has two very visible punkah:


    Keep in mind this connection, but next we have to look to French Indochina, and once we do that, things start to look familiar indeed.


    French Colonial architecture begins to more strongly resemble the almost hallucinatory refinement we see in Adventureland. The rambling balcony on this house would look at home dispensing Dole Whips.

    Hanoi, the capital city of Vietnam, was the center of the French Indochina Empire and in an old section of town we can see native building materials and tile roofs juxtaposed directly with the kind of elaborate railings and open balconies found at Magic Kingdom:


    France was so proud of Hanoi that they actually staged a Expo there in 1902. Intended to ride the coat-tails of the era's love of World's Fairs, to Magic Kingdom fans the architecture is startlingly familiar:


    If the Adventureland Veranda's corrugated roofs and shutters strike Americans as redolent of Key West or the Caribbean, well, the reason is because the French stopped off there too. Notice the similarities to this 1911 plantation house in St Lucia:


    If we stop off at Caribbean islands which still evoke a Gallic influence, we come across architecture which would look right at home in Adventureland. Port-au-Prince, in Haiti, still has some astonishingly beautiful French Colonial vernacular architecture:


    In fact, if the whole thing seems redolent of the American South and Jazz, remember just who it was whom we bought the Louisiana Purchase from. I've heard more than one guest describe the Veranda as reminding them of New Orleans, and they're right, because don't forget that we in the States still have French Colonial architecture too:


    We call our concentrated area of French Colonial architecture the French Quarter, but in New Orleans you can also hear it called the "Vieux Carre", which was what the French called it - it means "The Old Square". That's exactly what the Vietnamese call their concentrated area of French Colonial architecture - "The Old Square". This is not a coincidence. In fact, once you lock in on French Colonial as the architectural style, the pieces fall into place: tall rooms designed to circulate air:


    Sliding or opening shutters:


    Airy verandas, just as in the Old South... wait, the clue was actually in the name all along! Turns out the name "Adventureland Veranda" doesn't just describe the actual Verandas which lined the east side of the structure facing the Hub, but were meant to evoke the function of the space as a great house, a location of manners and refinement, a cool escape from the oppressive heat beyond.

    The Adventureland Veranda represents a French Colonial Plantation Home of the Victorian era. Now, notice that in its original state, the Veranda was heavily dressed with bamboo, wind chimes, and other South Pacific textures and patterns:


    This not only makes the interior more strange and exotic, helping differentiate it from Main Street, but looks forward to the totally rustic look of the "Native Village" deeper in Adventureland, typified by the Tiki stylings of the Sunshine Pavilion and the Jungle Cruise.

    It's a testament to the design talents of WED Enterprises that generations of guests detected this without really being able to put their finger exactly on what it was they were seeing. French Colonial architecture is at once familiar and exotic, an appropriate overture to the area to come. It can look European, American, Caribbean, Indian and Asian all at once, and has been quietly confounding description for decades.

    The Design of the Adventureland Veranda

    Once I had gathered the above sets of influences, I was able to start drilling down my search for material on the design of the Adventureland Veranda, and thanks to a fortuitous series of "finds", I'm able to present a fairly clear picture for the first time. So, it's time to meet Disney Legend Dorothea Redmond.

    Mrs. Redmond has been mentioned here before, but it's fair to say that if the design of Magic Kingdom had an "MVP", I'd place Dorothea at the top of the list. This may seem silly, until I start listing the locations based directly on her designs: The Crystal Palace, King Stephan's Banquet Hall, Liberty Tree Tavern, Plaza Restaurant, Tony's Town Square, Columbia Harbour House... need I go on?

    Dorothea's first job out of art school was working under legendary designer William Cameron Menzies.... on Gone With The Wind, David O Selznick's colossal production. Much of the feel of Redmond's production art of Tara was transferred to the screen through elaborate special effects shots:


    Redmond kept working for Selznick, including later productions like Rebecca and Notorious, with Alfred Hitchcock. Her art must have caught Hitch's eye, because he brought her over to Universal, where she did design interiors and storyboards on Shadow of a Doubt:


    Perhaps it was her work on Gone With The Wind that suggested her, but Walt Disney brought her onboard at WED Enterprises, where she contributed to New Orleans Square:


    I've been able to gather up a number of Redmond's pieces relating to Magic Kingdom's Adventureland, which if I had to guess, based on what I have, she designed the common areas in totality.


    That's something like what the Sunshine Pavilion looked like in 1968 - it compares tolerably well to the layout seen in this 1968 Magic Kingdom site plan, provided by Mike Lee at Widen Your World:


    Sharp eyed viewers will notice that the basic shape of the Adventureland Veranda is pretty much in place by then. Which is why I'm comfortable saying that this blueprint matches an elevation recently put up for sale by Van Eaton Galleries:


    Don't worry, we'll get closer to pull it apart presently. I was, in fact, going to pass on this unremarked when I noticed that Redmond had left barely legible source citations at the bottom of her art, and this find was too remarkable to pass up on. Although there were undoubtably other sources, I'm pleased to present two books which are direct sources for Magic Kingdom's Adventureland: The West Indies by Life World library, 1967, and Shadows From India by Roderick Cameron, 1958.


    Shadows From India is hard to find today - it seems to have been published only in Europe - and strikes me as the more interesting source so we will begin there. Although in the final park their placement was flipped, on the Redmond piece what is identifiably Aloha Isle is present:


    The final design was much reduced and had no visible structural decay, but that is definitely the building where Dole Whips were dispensed for three decades. Redmond's notation here directs us to Shadows From India page 135, which turns out is a fairly unenlightening reference for the windows seen here.

    However, if we look carefully, we can find more obvious sources, like these long slatted shades between columns on a British Colonial townhouse on page 142:


    These seem to have been copied pretty much directly:


    Elsewhere in Shadows From India, it's possible to find echoes of Adventureland:




    This British Colonial houseboat seems especially close to the mark:


    Going back to Redmond's art, we can see that originally, the very first structure inside Adventureland to the right -- was going to be a Shooting Gallery! Notice the crossed pistols on the mural top the left of the shooting gallery counter:


    Her citations direct us this time to page 105 in The West Indies, where she has reproduced a building sitting behind The Queen's Park in Trinidad pretty much exactly:


    The park is still there, but all evidence suggests that this fascinating Victorian is long gone. The final version came out a bit differently while retaining the overhanging eaves:


    One real life building that strikes me as even closer to the final Veranda design is the Boissiere House in Port-au-Prince:


    The central section of the Veranda facade here, what Redmond has labeled "6" and "7", would seem to be total fantasy. The glass gazebo, once called the South Seas Terrace (now the entrance to the Skipper Canteen), only has a notation indicating how the corrugated steel roof should be applied:


    But if we follow the paper trail to The West Indies, on page 85 we come across a startling discovery:



    It turns out this memorable building is actually a pretty direct copy of a house in Port-au-Prince, which at least as of 1967 was still standing. I've searched online and it no longer seems to exist - much of Port-au-Prince's Victorian architecture was either torn down or finally destroyed by the 2010 earthquake. But here's one, rarely bestowed form of immortality!

    As for the interior? I have only vestiges - scans from a Food Service planning packet dated 1970 on file at the Orlando Public Library - but enough to show how faithfully realized Redmond's designs were:




    A Club By Any Other Name

    Let's go back to the Adventurer's Club for a moment here.

    Here's the thing, even allowing for the inexact nature of farce, is that Adventurer's Club was always supposed to be a Gentleman's Club, heavily British East Indian in style. Supposedly the idea germinated from a theme party held by Joe Rhode in the late 80s called "The Last Days of the Raj". In other words the Adventurer's Club was a place you came back to to tell your stories and show off your treasures. The Adventureland Veranda is a plantation, meaning it has the feeling not only of being away from everything, but of domesticity.

    Now the Jungle Cruise is unavoidably British Colonial in theme, even if it's staffed with wisecracking yanks in the fashion of Humphrey Bogart in The African Queen. Thus it makes sense that the Jungle Cruise and Adventurer's Club would be bedfellows. So how does the Jungle Cruise fit into the Veranda?

    I'd argue that there is a backdoor here through the colonialism theme. And since it would be egregious to keep the distinctive exterior of the Veranda structure but gut the interior to resemble something it is not, then either the whole thing must be torn down and rebuilt into an entirely new stretch of architecture or the Jungle Cruise theme must be adapted to the new space.

    The key is that the Skipper Canteen must then by definition not be a social space in the style of the private club represented by the Adventurer's Club, but a private space, and that is just what Imagineering has done. They've made the Canteen into a converted home, even turning one of the side rooms into a family dining room with a fireplace and cabinets of fine china.

    Instead of making the connection between the Jungle Cruise and the Adventuer's Club and being disappointed that the Canteen does not follow suit, I'd like to propose a more appropriate lens to view the new restaurant through, one that actually works with both the Jungle Cruise and the Veranda:


    The Explorer's Club, also known as Colonel Hathi's Pizza Outpost at Disneyland Paris, is another space which is at once exotic and evokes domesticity, with soaring ceilings and shaded verandas.


    I'd rather have it that way, too. The approach is simple and matches the tone of what's there in the park already.


    One of the distinctive things about Disneyland and The Magic Kingdom, I feel, is that in many areas the theming is actually dead simple. There's nothing inherently fabulously elaborate about the Columbia Harbour House or the French Market, but they're persuasively alive in the ways that some more modern Disney themed establishments feel more cluttered up with stuff than actually carefully themed.

    And that's why I applaud what Imagineering did with the Skipper Canteen. It isn't just about reopening a space and keeping it true to its original intentions, it's about knowing when to stop. It's a problem that pops up more and more these days, as Walt Disney World sees more and more visitors and more and more projects put through the sausage factory.


    It's reassuring that the designers of the Canteen saw the value in the intended design, and knew that sometimes that was enough. And that a brilliant, historically valid original Magic Kingdom interior was repurposed and reopened to the general public is even more cause to celebrate.

    --

    Do you enjoy long, carefully written essays on the ideas behind theme parks, like this one? Hop on over to the Passport to Dreams Theme Park Theory Hub Page for even more!
              Wyclef Jean names new single after Fela Kuti   
    Haitian rapper, Wyclef Jean rsquo;s new single is named after Nigerian afrobeat legend, Fela Kuti. Jean explained that he picked the name as title, because he wants young ones to know about the legendary progenitor of Afrobeat. The new song lsquo;Fela Kuti rsquo; is the first single off his forthcoming album. ldquo;I decided to name it F ...
              This Woman's Before-and-After Photos Celebrate Her 35-Pound Weight Gain   
    We're taught to aspire toward weight loss, but Instagrammer @haitianqveeen posted about why weight gain can be empowering.
              COPA CENTENARIO   





    RADIO PANAMERICANA LA PAZ BOLIVIA radio/panamericana/

    RADIO FIDES DESDE LA PAZ BOLIVIA 



    CLICK AQUI PARA ESCUCHAR RADIO EL DEBER SANTA CRUZ 

     Radioiyambae.desde SANTA CRUZ DE LA SIERRA BOLIVIA

    RADIO SPORT desde SANTA CRUZ

    CANAL TV1 click aquii

    CANAL 2 TV  click aqui



    P2PNameLangTypeKbpsPlay
    NOGol CaracolTVesWeb (flash)2500Watch
    P2PElgoles 4esSopcast (web)2500Watch
    P2PCopa AmericaesSopcast (web)2500Watch
    P2PArenaVision 16esAcestream (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 28esSopcast (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 27esSopcast (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 8esAcestream (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 7esAcestream (web)2350Watch
    NOFutbolBlogAndres10esUstream1500Watch
    NORivo Sport 13esVeetle1500Watch
    NOZona Sports TyC 12esAkamai (flash)1500Watch
    NOEmiteSPORTS1esAkamai (flash)1500Watch
    NOZona Sports UDN 2esUstream1500Watch
    NORivo Sport 8esVeetle1500Watch
    NOFutbolBlogAndres 9esStreamup1130Watch
    NOMillox TVesIguide1130Watch




    0
    P2PNameLangTypeKbpsPlay
    P2PElgoles 4esSopcast (web)2500Watch
    P2PCopa AmericaesSopcast (web)2500Watch
    P2PArenaVision 8esAcestream (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 7esAcestream (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 28esSopcast (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 27esSopcast (web)2350Watch
    P2PArenaVision 16esAcestream (web)2350Watch
    NOFutbolBlogAndres10esUstream1500Watch
    NORivo Sport 13esVeetle1500Watch
    NOEmiteSPORTS1Akamai (flash)1500Watch
    NORivo Sport 8esVeetle1500Watch
    NORivo Sport 7esRocktv1130Watch
    NOFutbolBlogAndres 9esStreamup1130Watch
    NOFutbBlogAndresMX1esVeetle1130Watch
    NOMillox TVesIguide1130Watch
    NORivo Sport 6esByetv1100Watch
    NOteledeportetv 7esIguide1100Watch
    NORivo TVX1esWeb (flash)1100Watch
    NORivo Sport 1esWebflash1100Watch
    NODirectoGolTv CesWeb (flash)1100Watch
    NODirectoGolTv 7frWeb (flash)1100Watch
    NORivo TVX5esWeb (flash)1100Watch
    NODirectoGolTv A2esWeb (flash)1100Watch
    NOAzulyblancoesHdcast1100Watch
    NOFutbBlogAndresMX2esBroadcast1100Watch
    NOFutbolManiakos 1aesWeb (flash)1100Watch
    NORealMadrid LiveenCast4u1100Watch
    NORivo TVX16esRocktv1100Watch
    NOVipRacing5frStreamlive1100Watch
    NOK2 Deportes 1esIguide1100Today's a special day, y'all! It's been an entire year since I put on my virtual big girl britches and opened up my very own shop! I can't believe it! Even though I've been selling on Etsy for quite some time, having an online home where people could shop Stephanie Creekmur products, truly was a dream come true. I waited patiently (or rather, not so patiently) as other new shops popped up, and though the wait was hard, I'm so proud of what I've created (with the help of many talented individuals!) and I can't wait to continue to watch it grow!

    Today I'm happy to share the updates to our website (blog updates will come soon!) as well as a few new products!


    Maybe one of the most noticeable changes is our new logo! Y'all may remember, way back in March, I shared some reasons why I was changing my logo. It was something that had been on my mind for awhile, but once I saw my branding was a little too closely imitated, I knew it was the right time. I worked on many concepts and in the end decided to keep it fairly similar but I wanted to hand lettered it myself. I'm so happy with the outcome and it's been so fun to see all of our new packaging come in sporting the new digs!


    I love the fact that no one else can have a logo with the same look. While I absolutely adored (still do!) my previous logo (calligraphy by Angelique Ink) there were way too many other shops out there with similar logos. Now our shop has a face that is truly it's own!


    We've also added a few new products to the mix! I think my favorite is this Release It Notepad!

    To celebrate our one year shop anniversary, we have a free gift for the first 40 customers who spend $10 or more. No coupon code necessary - if you are one of the first 40 (seriously, that's all we have folks!) to make a purchase you will receive a set of 5 Southern Sayin' Note Cards. Keep for yourself or gift to a friend! Each set will contain 5 different southern sayings and we are not able to let you choose the selections but we promise, they're all adorable! :)

    AND, if your'e still with me! I thought I'd give a few updates on my summer since it's been kind of quiet around here, since MAY! I don't know about y'all, but when it's Summertime it's extremely hard for me to keep focused! All I want to do is head outside and relax by the pool! It's strange that I also feel my most creative in the Summertime, I just wish I could have someone else make it all happen! Ha!


    First up, my sweet Bella Mae was hit by a car the first night I was in Haiti. She was heading down to my aunt and uncle's house (they live about 2 houses down across the street) to see if she could find me. It's been harder to lose her than I ever could have imagined. She was my baby and the hurt has been deep and left me feeling like something is missing. Because it is. RIP Bella Mae Creekmur. I'm so thankful I was able to be your mama for the almost 4 years we had together.


    As I said, Bella was killed the first night I was in Haiti. I didn't hear the news until the next afternoon so I had at least one peaceful evening. This is the view off of our living quarters. The mountains are so beautiful and this photo just doesn't even do it justice. Where we stay is much, MUCH better conditions than what the people of the village surrounding us have. I am thankful for the tiny comforts from home (running water for showers and an actual toilet) we have but it always leaves me feeling a little guilty. I had a great time on the trip but I have to admit I spent a lot of it just trying to hold back the tears for my Bella.

    I have lots of updates for you regarding the road repair (Love One Another project) and the money we all were able to raise! Thank you SO much to those of you who donated as well as those of you who purchased the Love One Another print for your homes!


    And last, but certainly not least - please meet my newest addition, Dixie Mae Creekmur. She is 8 weeks old today (I've had her about two weeks now!) and she has lifted my spirits in more ways that I could have imagined. I was a little worried it was too soon to be getting a new puppy, but I'm so thankful I did. I didn't quite realize just how sad I was until I got her. I so wish I could watch her and Bella play together. It would be so cute but I know that if Bella were here I wouldn't have Dixie.

    And, I think I'll leave it at that! I hope you enjoy the new products (we have more coming in a few weeks - think back to school!) and our little facelift! I hope y'all have a great rest of your 





              Hier soir j'ai assisté à une "conférence sur Un optimisme hésitant   
    Hier soir j'ai assisté à une "conférence gesticulée" sur le sujet de la transition écologico-énergétique, durant laquelle la notion d'effondrement était clairement mentionnée. Sans qu'il n'y ait vraiment de "solution", la conférencière terminait sur une note optimiste en voyant dans ce chambardement une opportunité heureuse de nouvelle façon d'être en société. Elle insistait sur le fait qu'il revenait à chacun de nous de prendre notre part pour faire advenir ce que nous souhaitions… plutôt que de laisser d'autres courants d'idée, nettement moins enthousiasmants, prendre la place. Cela m'a réjoui :)
    Depuis quelques temps je ressens le besoin d'aller dans ce sens. Pour le truc du colibri, le truc à comprendre c'est de se voir soi-même comme la goutte d'eau. L'illusion serait de se donner bonne conscience en ayant seulement des "actions goutte d'eau" d'un côté, et continuer le gaspillage par ailleurs. Or cette "erreur" est très largement majoritaire… et je n'en suis évidemment pas exempt ;) C'est pourquoi je ressens l'envie de m'engager plus entièrement, et notamment en essayant de sensibiliser chacun autour de moi. Goutte à goutte… Bises militantes
              Boys Track All-Scholastics   

    THE HERALD TEAM

    Nathaniel Battista Sr. Concord-Carlisle 800

    Theo Burba So. Newton North 800

    Davonte Burnett Jr. Needham 100, 200

    Jake Carlson Sr. Billerica 400 hurdles

    Smith Charles So. Milton Long jump

    Hayden Dillow Jr. Xaverian Discus

    Erick Duffy Sr. North Andover 110 hurdles, pole vault

    Ricky Francois Sr. Brighton 200

    Nathaniel Klein Sr. Newton North Shot put

    Ryan Oosting So. Arlington Mile, 2-mile

    Calvin Perkins Jr. Belmont 400

    Michael Pichay Sr. BC High Triple jump

    Mark Porter Sr. Reading Javelin

    Danny Renwick Sr. Old Rochester High jump, pentathlon

    4x100 relay: Waltham

    Matt Luong, Sr., Corey Masterson, Sr., Keith Mukire, Sr., Kyle Torres, Jr.

    4x400 relay: Mansfield

    Kyle Amerantes, Sr., Kevin Crawford, Jr., Nicholas Horn, Jr., Mike Shannon, Jr.

    4x800 relay: Marshfield

    James Condon, Jr., Joseph Donovan, Sr., Derek Holmes, Sr., Michael Maglio, Jr.

    NATHANIEL BATTISTA

    CONCORD-CARLISLE

    The senior waged a fierce duel with Newton North’s Theo Burba on the final straightaway at All-States to come away with second in the 800 in 1:54.59. Battista handily won the Division 2 title in his specialty with a 1:57.08. Undefeated in both indoor and outdoor track in the regular season, Battista was Concord-Carlisle’s Most Valuable distance runner. Battista will do a post-graduate year at Deerfield Academy.

    THEO BURBA

    NEWTON NORTH

    The sophomore legged out a first-place finish in 1:54.50 to capture the 800 at the All-State meet and then raced to a strong fourth-place showing against a talented field at the New Englands. Burba also captured the Division 1 and Coaches Invitational titles in the 800. A Bay State Conference All-Star and honor student, he helped lead the Tigers to the team All-State championship.

    DAVONTE BURNETT

    NEEDHAM

    The junior sprinted to gold in both the 100 and 200 at All-States as well as the 100 at the New Englands. Burnett clocked a best of 10.48 and 21.36 in the 100 and 200, respectively, during the spring, and ran a 47.7 split in the 4x400. Burnett was victorious in both sprints at the Division 1 state meet and was a Bay State Conference All-Star. Burnett owns eight school records.

    JAKE CARLSON

    BILLERICA

    The senior clocked a 55.05 to win the 400 hurdles at the Division 1 meet and then claimed gold at All-States in 55.54. Billerica’s team captain and MVP, Carlson took seventh against a deep, talented field in the 300 hurdles at New Englands. Third in the MSTCA Pentathlon, Carlson is a member of the National Honor Society and will play football at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

    SMITH CHARLES

    MILTON

    One of the most electrifying tracksters in Massachusetts, this sophomore had a big day at the Division 3 championships, where he took home gold medals in the 100, 200 and long jump. Charles was the All-State champion in the long jump and finished second to Needham’s Davonte Burnett in the 100. He went on to capture the New England title in the long jump and was fourth in the 100.

    HAYDEN DILLOW

    XAVERIAN

    Dillow captured the All-State discus title with a personal best throw of 149-11 after a sixth-place showing in the Division 1 championships. He finished second in the Catholic Conference meet and was a conference All-Star. An honor roll student, the junior also plays football, is involved in Peer Ministry and the Politics Club, and will compete in the Bay State Games.

    ERICK DUFFY

    NORTH ANDOVER

    The senior went out in style by winning the pole vault at the New Balance Outdoor Nationals with a leap of 17-1, bettering his state record by 6 inches. The All-State champion in the pole vault and 110 hurdles, he also captured the New England title in the pole vault and the silver medal in the 110 hurdles. Duffy, who swept both events at the Division 1 state meet, will compete for Harvard University next season.

    RICKY FRANCOIS

    BRIGHTON

    Francois was second to Needham’s Davonte Burnett in the 200 at both the Division 1 championship meet and the All-States. He owns the school record in both the 200 and 400 and was the MVP of the South Shore Principals meet. Francois was a Boston City League All-Star and is training for the World Championships where he hopes to compete for Haiti.

    NATHANIEL KLEIN

    NEWTON NORTH

    A big reason for Newton North’s win at All-States, Klein was second in the shot put with a toss of 53-51⁄2. The Division 1 shot put champion, the senior had a personal best toss of 54-6 and was the Bay State Conference champion. Klein helped lead Newton North to the shot put title in the Div. 1 Relays as well. An honor student who also played football, Klein will attend Middlebury College.

    RYAN OOSTING

    ARLINGTON

    The New Balance National Outdoor champion in the 5,000, Oosting was clearly the best distance runner of the spring. The sophomore captured the mile (4:14.44) and 2-mile (9:05.85) at All-States after sweeping both events at the Division 2 state meet. He won the 1,600 at New Englands and the 2-mile at the Middlesex League meet, where he was named MVP. He will captain the cross-country team in the fall.

    CALVIN PERKINS

    BELMONT

    Perkins was a strong second in the 400 at the All-States in a sizzling 48.65. The junior clocked 49.13 to defend his Division 3 title in the event and moved up to the 800 in the Middlesex League championships for a 1:58.96 win. A member of both the cross country and indoor track teams, as well as the National Honor Society, Perkins is a trumpet player with the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra.

    MICHAEL PICHAY

    BC HIGH

    The senior leaped 45-1 to capture the All-State championship in the triple jump and placed seventh in the long jump as well. Pichay was the bronze medalist in the triple jump at the Division 1 meet and fourth in the long jump. He owns a personal best of 45-71⁄4 in the triple jump and 21-8 in the long jump. Pichay will continue his track & field career and study pre-law at the College of the Holy Cross in the fall.

    MARK PORTER

    READING

    Porter capped his senior year off in fine fashion by winning the All-State title in the javelin with a school-record throw of 194-7. Porter was the bronze medalist at the Division 2 meet and also won the Middlesex League championship (181-0) and the Andover Boosters Invitational (171-6). Porter will attend Penn State in the fall and major in plant science.

    DANIEL RENWICK

    OLD ROCHESTER

    The All-State and New England champion in the high jump, the multi-talent was also the All-State pentathlon winner with a state record of 3,592 points. He was the South Coast Conference champion in the 400 hurdles, 110 hurdles and high jump. Renwick holds the school record in the long jump and was an All-American in the pentathlon. Renwick will major in math at Williams College in the fall.

    4x100 RELAY: WALTHAM

    Matt Luong, Sr., Corey Masterson, Sr., Keith Mukire, Sr., Kyle Torres, Jr.

    The speedy group combined to capture the Dual County League, Division 2 state and All-State titles in the 4x100, with a season’s best and school record of 42.21. They went on to take third at New Englands. Masterson, who ran the first leg, finished fourth at the Div. 2 race and will attend UMass-Lowell. The second leg was run by Torres, who finished third at the state meet in the 200. Luong, who raced third, will run track at Westfield State. Mukire, who anchored the quartet, has a best in the triple jump of 43-6 and will attend UMass.

    4x400 RELAY: MANSFIELD

    Kyle Amerantes, Sr., Kevin Crawford, Jr., Nicholas Horn, Jr., Mike Shannon, Jr.

    This group ran 3:20.22 to grab the silver at All-States after taking second in the Division 1 state meet. The foursome then went on to place third at New Englands with a time of 3:18.76, setting a school record. An honor roll student, Amerantes was second in the 400 at the state meet and will attend the Unviersity of Vermont. Crawford placed fourth in the 800 at the Div. 1 meet and sixth at All-States. Horn has a 50.6 personal best in the 400 and clocked 23.36 for the 200. Shannon was fourth in the Div. 1 400 hurdles in 56.64.

     

    4x800 RELAY: MARSHFIELD

    James Condon, Jr., Joseph Donovan, Sr., Derek Holmes, Sr., Michael Maglio, Jr.

    The foursome had few peers in this event, taking home the All-State title in a time of 7:50.97 after winning the Division 2 state title. They went on to place fourth at New Englands. An honor student, Condon took second in the 800 at the Div. 2 meet. Donovan, an Atlantic Coast League All-Star, will attend UMass in the fall. Holmes is a distance specialist who will continue his track career and study civil engineering at UMass-Lowell. Maglio is an ACL All-Star and a member of the National Honor Society.

    Author(s): 

    Herald Staff

    herald.staff's picture

    Articles

    Blog Posts

    061717btrkCARLSON.jpg

    Photo by: 
    Jake Carlson - boys track - Billerica - Boston Herald All-Scholastic

    061417Renwickbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Daniel Renwick, Old Rochester Regional, track. Friday, June 16, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061617btrkPorter.jpg

    Photo by: 
    Mark Porter - boys track - Reading - Boston Herald All-Scholastic

    061417Mansfieldbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    CRAWFORD

    061417Kleinbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Nathaniel Klein, Newton North, track. Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061417Francoisbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Ricky Frangois, Brighton, track. Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061417Dillonbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Hayden Dillow, Xaverian Brothers, track. Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061417Burbabtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Theo Burba, Newton North, track. Thursday, June 15, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061417Walthambtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    MASTERSON

    061417Oostingbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Ryan Oosting, Arlington, btrk. Wednesday, June 14, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061417Duffybtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Erick Duffy, North Andover, track. Wednesday, June 14, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    061417Burnettbtrk.jpg

    Photo by: 
    ALL SCHOLATIC- Davonte Burnett, Needham, track. Wednesday, June 14, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    032117btrkCharles.jpg

    Photo by: 
    All Scholastic. Smith Charles, Milton, track. Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (Staff photo by Stuart Cahill)

    062117btrkpichay.jpg

    Photo by: 
    Michael Pichay - boys track - BC High - Boston Herald All-Scholastic

    062017btrkperkins.jpg

    Photo by: 
    (062017) Calvin Perkins - boys track - Belmont - Boston Herald All-Scholastics

    052117btrkBattista.jpg

    Photo by: 
    Nathaniel Battista - boys track - Concord-Carlisle - Boston Herald All-Scholastic
    Source: 
    DTI
    Freely Available: 
    Disable AP title update: 

              The Legacy of Hugo Chavez   
    HUGO CHAVEZ died on 5 March 2013, and two events took place recently in London to mark the first anniversary of his passing. Canning House organized a half-day conference aimed at assessing the Chavez legacy, while the Venezuela Solidarity Campaign (VSC) set itself the task of celebrating the Bolivarian Revolution that Chavez led and that his elected successor, Nicolás Maduro, seeks to continue.
    Headquartered in London’s exclusive Belgravia, Canning House exists to “foster mutual understanding and engagement between the UK and the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian world”. Membership is open to all, but at heart it has always been a conservative organization, run by men and women in smart attire, well-intentioned but of anodyne views, and perhaps a little over fond of rubbing shoulders with senior executives of big companies, ministers of state and people with seats in the Upper House. A patrician stiffness pervades Canning House, a lingering vestige of empire discernible in the crusty tones with which the old guard greet each other at gatherings and peer over the shoulders of anyone they don’t recognize. If they speak Spanish or Portuguese, most do so in a resolutely British accent with no concession to native rhythms or inflections.
    Nevertheless, Canning House continues to be a useful locus of engagement with the Latin-American world, not least because it manages to secure excellent speakers from all the countries as well as from the UK for its lectures and round tables, and is generally careful to maintain political neutrality in its choice of contributors and subject matter. Such was the case with the Conference on Hugo Chavez.
    Venezuela’s charismatic leader was and remains controversial, and to reflect this Canning House invited a roster of participants from all sides of the political spectrum. Notable among the “Chavistas” were London’s former mayor, Ken Livingstone, who had tried to develop a long-term relationship between Caracas and London (subsequently terminated by Boris Johnson) and, more convincing because she is clearly more knowledgeable, Alicia Castro, Argentina’s current ambassador to the UK and former ambassador to Venezuela. These two could be described as representing the progressive left. In the political centre were several speakers who did their best to be informative rather than polemical. Representing the far right were two Venezuelan die-hard anti-Chavistas: an economist called Pedro Palma who appeared to enjoy telling the audience that his country is on the brink of financial ruin, and Diego Arria, a politician who by his stiff mannerisms, elegant diction, and impeccable attire manifested his membership of the economic and social elite. Latin Americans and those who know the continent will be familiar with the type.
    The presence on the same stage of ideological adversaries who, in deference to the setting, were obliged to maintain a semblance of politeness towards each other, made the event both fascinating and informative; though given the strength of opposing views, I doubt whether anyone was persuaded to change the opinion they held on entering the hall.
    It is difficult, maybe impossible, for anyone with knowledge of Latin America not to find themselves on one side or other of the Chavez debate. I found Palma’s and Arria’s assertions unconvincing and their opinions too extreme to merit serious consideration. Many of those who attended, however, clearly thought the opposite - among them a coterie of young Venezuelans, in London perhaps to study or at leisure, who made their views known with rounds of applause and the occasional hiss; privileged youngsters, like those in Caracas and other cities who have made a splash by setting up road blocks, burning tyres and throwing Molotov cocktails.
    What of the VSC conference? Here there was no question of neutrality. One of organization’s aims is to “defend the achievements of the Bolivarian Revolution”. Unsurprisingly, no one was invited to speak on behalf of the opposition.
    The day-long affair included plenary sessions and workshops dealing both with the internal politics of Venezuela and with the influence of the Chavez revolution on Latin America and further afield.
    Ambassador Castro was the only speaker to appear at both events. Her address resembled the one she gave for Canning House, though in form it was more relaxed and overtly chavista. She ended with the traditional clenched fist salute symbolic in Latin America of solidarity with the people. Alicia Castro is a stalwart defender of Latin-American independence and of the kind of progressive governments that currently hold power not just in Venezuela and, of course, in her own country, but in Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile and maybe even Cuba, that favorite bogey of successive US administrations and of the western right-wing media. Other speakers included Dr Francsico Dominguez, general secretary of the VSC, Mark Weisbrot from the US-based Centre for Economic and Political Research (CEPR), Seamus Milne of The Guardian, Neil Findlay a Labour member of the Scottish Parliament, representatives of several Latin-American embassies, notable academics, journalists, and leaders of pressure groups. Moving accounts were given of the continent-wide struggle for emancipation of the poor and of native peoples; and there were pleas for an end to US interference in the internal affairs of the region.
    This last theme loomed large. Throughout the day, the immense spectre of the United States cast a shadow over all the discussions. Since the declaration of the Monroe Doctrine in 1823, there have been over 170 US interventions in Latin America from an attack by US marines on Puerto Rico in 1824 to the US-backed overthrow of Honduran President Manuel Zelaya in 2009. Among the most salient interventions are the 1847 annexation of half of Mexico, the prising of Panama from Colombia in 1903 in preparation for US occupation of the Canal Zone, the shelling of the Mexican port of Veracruz in 1914, the overthrow of the Haitian government in 1915 and occupation of the country until 1925, the conversion of Cuba into a US protectorate under the so-called Platt Amendment in 1901, occupation of the Dominican Republic and installation of a puppet regime in 1916, incessant interference in Nicaragua from the mid 1920s onwards which included in 1937 installation of one of Latin-America’s vilest dictatorships under Anastasio Somoza, forced concession of Guantanamo Bay in Cuba and support for the corrupt regime of Fulgencio Batista which lasted from 1934 until the Revolution ousted him in 1959.
    More recent occurrences include the overthrow of President Jacobo Arbenz of Guatemala (1954), of President Joao Goulart of Brazil (1964), of President Arturo Umberto Illia of Argentina (1966), of President Salvador Allende of Chile (1973), of President Jean Bertrand Aristide in 1991 and again in 2004, and two celebrated failures: the invasion of Cuba in 1961, and the coup against Hugo Chavez in 2002.
    As Francisco Dominguez pointed out in his address, in recent years direct military intervention by the US in Latin America has fallen out of favour as a method of control. Washington now prefers to finance US-friendly opposition groups and to institute sanctions against regimes it doesn’t like. Venezuela is currently a target of both tactics.
    Two quite different views of the world are struggling for primacy in post-Chavez Venezuela. In the anti-Chavista camp are those who believe privilege and inequality to be products of nature or decrees of God. They are happy with neo-liberalism, with minimal state interference in the market, with US hemispheric hegemony which they see as a bulwark against the evils of socialism, and with a concept of personal freedom that allows them to do more or less whatever they wish. They believe in democracy provided it doesn’t undermine their interests.
    Chavistas by contrast think a more equal, kinder world is possible, one in which human solidarity, the sharing of resources, and an end to extremes of poverty and inequality can and should constitute the moral basis of political and social policy. For the poor and the lower middle classes, marginalized for centuries in a deeply unequal society, Chavez represented a beacon of hope not that the proletariat and peasantry would take over the state in some utopian version of Marxism-Leninism, but that the Bolivarian Revolution would launch a social transformation sufficient to ensure that every family in Venezuela would have the means to lead a dignified life. Simple and revolutionary; too much so for the opposition which, after failing to overthrow Chavez in 2002, is trying again with his successor.
    Nicolas Maduro won the hotly contested 2013 presidential election by a tiny margin of 1.5%., a result that unleashed a torrent of accusations of fraud from the United States as well as from the Venezuelan opposition. No such complaint came from the US when Felipe Calderón won the Mexican election in 2006 by an even smaller margin (0.58%) and in circumstances strongly suggesting that the real winner had been the left-wing candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Nor have we heard much about the Venezuelan municipal elections that took place in December 2013 in which Maduro’s Party, the PSUV[1], received a substantially increased share of the vote. Judgements in the US about whether a Latin-American election is valid depend entirely on the political position of the candidates. We should be in no doubt about this. US administrations - whether Democrat or Republican - have never shown themselves willing to accept governments in Latin America that the State Department considers to be overly left wing or inimical to US interests. Chavez was elected and re-elected with large majorities. In the US he was nevertheless commonly referred to as a dictator.
    A program of opposition protests against President Maduro began as soon as he took office. Its stated objective is “La Salida” (the exit): the ejection of Maduro from power not by means of the ballot box but via streets protests, attacks on government offices, economic sabotage, disruption of daily life, and attempts to marshal international support for regime change.”Our aim”, affirms Leopoldo López, former mayor of Chacao, the wealthiest municipality of Caracas “is to get rid of the government”. Another protest leader , Roberto Alonso, explains that ”…the sole aim of the guarimba (street protests, barricades etc.), apart from paralyzing the country, is to create chaos….so as to oblige the Castro-communist regime of Venezuela to implement the Plan Ávila[2].” This would inevitably lead to the end of the Maduro government.
    These efforts at disruption - enthusiastically adopted by students dissidents - are portrayed by western media and opposition supporters as a peaceful campaign to restore democracy in the teeth of a repressive dictatorship. Such was the account given to the Canning House audience by Diego Arria who numbers amongst his many achievements that of having graduated from the Augusta Military Academy at Fort Defiance, Virginia. In a self-serving biography (La Hora de la Verdad - the Hour of Truth), Arria describes Chavez as “the costliest sick man in human history”. Venezuela, he tells us, “is under Cuban occupation and the Venezuelan government and army have handed over national sovereignty to the communists.”
    María Corina Machado, recently ejected from the Venezuelan Congress for accepting a role as a Panamanian official so as to be able to speak against her own government at a meeting of the Organisation of American States, is another right-winger given red-carpet treatment in Washington for her heroic efforts to return democracy to Venezuela. She was one of the elite figures who signed the Carmona Decree of 2002 affirming the overthrow of Hugo Chavez and the installation of a replacement government. According to Machado, the student protests which have received so much publicity are peaceful and the violence that has resulted in several deaths are entirely the responsibility of the government. This too is the version offered by Enrique Krauze, the influential Mexican rent-a-reactionary, who in a New York Times piece of February 27, describes how the country’s youth are fighting for democracy against the brutal repression of an oil-rich state. In the same newspaper on the previous day, Thor Halvorssen, president of the New York-based Human Rights Foundation, told readers that “…the majority of those protesting are Venezuela’s poor..”, a claim contradicted by all the available evidence, including the eye-witness reports given at the VSC conference by Mark Weisbrot, Seamus Milne and Neil Findlay. Halvorssen, despite his name, is Venezuelan and a cousin of Leopoldo López. We are in the territory of the super-rich Venezuelan aristocracy.
    According to Weisbrot, who has walked the streets, the protests are not coming from the poor who have largely benefited from the Bolivarian Revolution, but from the rich; the barricades are not in underprivileged neighbourhoods, but in the exclusive ones where small groups “engage in nightly battles with security forces, throwing rocks and firebombs and running from tear gas.”
    Nevertheless, true to form, US Secretary of State John Kerry has taken up the cudgels on behalf of the downtrodden elite, criticising the Venezuelan government for inhibiting the right of cities to protest peacefully and accusing Maduro of unleashing a campaign of terror against his own people. Not to be outdone, the House Foreign Affairs Committee has just passed a bill proposing sanctions against the Venezuelan authorities and support for the Opposition.
    Doubtless all this is music to the ears of the right, Corina Machado foremost among them, who have trooped off to Washington to persuade US public opinion and Congress to “support” the opposition in her country “for the sake of democracy”. Latin America’s whole history demonstrates the danger of such overtures. Yet one of the region’s many ironies is that ever since gaining independence from Spain, it has produced a steady supply of fifth columnists ready to trade that independence in exchange for a US-backed regime that will defend their interests. Apart from the litany of tired accusations about the repressive nature of the current government, three complaints about Venezuela have gained traction internationally: endemic violence, corruption in public life, and media repression.
    Criminal violence is a problem confronting several Latin-American countries though in each it takes slightly different forms. Honduras, Mexico, Colombia, El Salvador, Brazil and Venezuela all suffer from high levels of homicide - much of it perpetrated by organized gangs. There is no avoiding the crime figures, which are a terrible stain on the region, nor the fact that governments of every stripe have consistently failed to find a solution. This is not an ideological issue but one of long-term social and economic failure arising above all from the marginalization of large sectors of the population that have no stake in the status quo. For many, it is easier to make a living from theft, smuggling, kidnapping and murder than from conventional employment.
    Accusations that Venezuela no longer has a free press are greedily seized upon by conservatives on both sides of the Atlantic. A storm of protest erupted, for example, at the sale of the anti-government TV station Globovision - which in 2003 had publicly called for the overthrow of President Chavez. One can imagine what would have happened if CNN or Fox News had advocated a coup against Obama. However, Globovision with less than 5% of the national audience is a tiny player. About 90% of media consumption is supplied by the private sector, which is one reason why no one has to search or go under cover to see or hear criticism of the government.
    What about official corruption? Undeniably it exists, much of it arising out of price controls and market subsidies. Venezuela’s gasoline (petrol) prices are the cheapest on the planet, the result of a subsidy so extravagant that, according to a study by two Venezuelan scholars at Harvard University, its value exceeds that of all social programs combined. Cheap gasoline means, amongst other things, that large amounts of fuel are smuggled into Brazil and Colombia across borders patrolled by the Venezuelan military but apparently highly porous, giving rise to the suspicion that much of the illegal trade takes place under the auspices of the army. Likewise, many basic products imported into Venezuela for sale at regulated prices are smuggled into Colombia at a profit. According to a brilliant article by Angel Ricardo Martinez in Foreign Policy, up to 40 percent of all Venezuelan imports find their way to Colombia, destabilizing the latter’s internal markets, and creating critical shortages in Venezuela.
    Although the gasoline subsidy and the associated smuggling operations are highly damaging, not even Chavez seems to have been strong enough to confront the army about its role in these lucrative activities. The late president did not, however, create the problem. As Martinez points out , “….the gas subsidy has been in place for several decades, with its current price fixed since 1996, three years before Chavez came to power.”
    If drugs are the curse of Colombia and Mexico, oil is Venezuela’s curse; and it will be a very courageous government that tries to deal with the gasoline subsidy without an accommodation with the armed forces and strong support from neighbouring countries.
    Venezuela’s problems are multiple, difficult to describe in terms that do justice to their complexity, and even more difficult to resolve.
    Independently of the long-term issues, however, the present juncture is critical not only for Venezuela’s immediate future but for that of Latin America as a whole. A US-backed triumph for the inhabitants of Altamira, for Leopoldo López, Diego Arria, Corina Machado and their followers, for the rich kids protesting in the streets, will plunge the country back into a subservient relationship with the United States, encouraging the latter to reassert the Monroe Doctrine and convincing the US and European public that, after all, Latin-Americans are incapable of building lasting democracies based on the rule of law. If the democratically elected government of Venezuela is not safe, then neither are the progressive governments of other nations in the region. US eyes will be especially focused thereafter on Bolivia, on Ecuador, and even on the governments of larger nations that fail to toe the line.
    This is not a scenario that anyone should find palatable. [1] United Socialist Party of Venezuela [2] A contingency plan to use the army to maintain public order - employed in 1989 by President Carlos Andrés Pérez with disastrous consequences.
              Dead or Alive   
    Zombies. The walking DEAD. The living DEAD. The unDEAD. But are they really dead??

    Well the idea of a zombie originates from Haiti and a young man by the name of Wade Davis was fascinated by the tales of voodoo. He had read stories of zombies and their link with voodoo, which told of the people being controlled as laborers by a powerful sorcerers or bokors. In the 80s he presented a pharmacological case that could explain zombie like states. So the bokor would introduce 2 chemicals to the victim. Straight to the blood, usually via a wound. Assumably this is where the grotesque name of the modern pop culture zombie comes from. First he we add a toxin "coup de poudre" the main component being tetrodotoxin which is found in the flesh of puffer fish, fugu, which when not prepared correctly can be deadly as popularised by a certain Mr. Homer J. Simpson, well he wasn't a friend to the salad....




    Together which another drug these powders were said to induce a death-like state in which the victim's will would be entirely subjected to that of the bokor. Then they would be reanimated after being buried. Thus breaking up through the soil comes the iconic zombie. But is it immortal now or is it just a corpse?

    This point can be transferred to other debates. The one we'll choose is the philosophical hot pot that is cheese of course. So what is cheese. It is one of life's great conundrum. Is the cheese the immortal embodiment of milk? Or is it a corpse vessel that is the Tumuli of the milk? The opposing sides of the argument go as such....


    The late great American author Clifton Fadiman argued...

    "A cheese may disappoint.
    It may be dull, it may be naive, it may be oversophisticated.
    Yet it remains, cheese, milk’s leap toward immortality"

    Where as a certain James Joyce disagreed with him...

    "A corpse is meat gone bad. Well and what’s cheese? Corpse of milk."

    NO, NO, NO, NO......... Yes..........













              John Wicks - Haiti Feat. Kodak Black Download   

    Download: John Wicks - Haiti Feat. Kodak Black Download


              Haiti’s Troubled Healthcare System   

    The World Bank suggests that what Haiti’s healthcare system needs is not just more resources, but a reallocation that focuses on primary care.

    The post Haiti’s Troubled Healthcare System appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.


              News Briefs 30-06-2017   

    Updated edition...

    Quote of the Day:

    Everything is dumb right now. From nose to tail, we have become the dumbest, saddest pig at the county fair. Historians will not refer to this period as THE DARK AGES, but rather, THE DUMB AGES

    Chuck Wendig


              WR | Apr 2010 | Haiti Relief   
    Within hours of the Haiti earthquake, the Church sent humanitarian aid to victims. Long-term plans are in place to help restore normalcy and hope to the people of Haiti.
              HAITI Kettenanhänger aus massiv 585 Gelbgold   
    218,90 EUR
    Kettenanh?nger aus 585 Gelbgold HaitiEin sch?ner ca. 23 mm gro?er Kettenanh?nger aus der Form der Haiti Landkarte aus massiv 585 Gelbgold!Der Anh?nger ist mit einer gro?en ?se versehen, sodass dieser auch mit einer etwas dickeren Halskette getragen werden kann.Die Anh?nger werden in einer traditionsreichen deutschen Goldschmiede aus massivem Material hergestellt und selbstverst?ndlich 585 gestempelt!Landkarte: HaitiMaterial: massiv 585 GelbgoldGr??e: ca. 23 mm und 1 mm dickOberfl?che: Vorderseite handpoliert und R?ckseite matt geb?rstetGewicht: ca. 1,8 gSonderanfertigungen, wie z.B. ein anderes Land, gr??er oder aus einem anderen Material k?nnen auf Wunsch f?r Sie hergestellt werden. Fragen Sie uns einfach danach! Wir werden Ihnen sicherlich weiter helfen k?nnen!Alle Kettenanh?nger werden direkt nach Ihrer Bestellung von einer traditionsreichen deutschen Goldschmiede extra f?r Sie angefertigt.Die Abbildungen sind nicht in Originalgr??e - Bitte entnehmen Sie die Gr??e der jeweiligen Produktbeschreibung!

              Our First Port Labadee Haiti   
    Today I was up early and so I went up on deck to take some photos of the ship without people in them. We were pulling up to Labadee for our first port. After I was done I went back to the room and Nikki was up so we got dressed and went to breakfast.
               Episode 131: A Giant Circle Jerk of Prophecy    
    This Guy’s Running for Elected Office in Texas, So He Just Trashed Atheists in His Latest Campaign Ad I'll stick to Muggle science, thanks Chiropractors head to Haiti, Dominican Republic Elf highway blockade Trent Frank Agrees That Obama Is Either A Secret Muslim Or Acting Just Like One The Year In Homophobia: Ten Of The Worst Anti-LGBT Stories Of 2013 Nativist Of The Year Award: Eight Of 2013's Worst Xenophobic Leaders https://www.facebook.com/groups/OpinionatedAtheist/permalink/513895778725522/
              Startup ‘Coach’ Derrick Duplessy ’03 Helps Young Urban Entrepreneurs (Bay State Banner)   
    Speaking at a recent networking event in Boston, Duplessy—whose parents immigrated from Haiti—described himself thus: "I"m a coach. I work with startups and with artists. The big thing is, there are still many of you that could be doing so much better."

              Penguasa Dubai Bantu Warga Inggris Membeli Gereja   

    Secara tak disangka, seorang penguasa Dubai, Syekh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum menyumbangkan sejumlah uang untuk membantu penduduk sebuah kampung di Inggris untuk membeli gereja.

    Seperti diberitakan BBC yang dikutip Sabtu (1/7/2017), bantuan itu diterima warga Godolphin Cross, Cornwall, barat daya Inggris setelah mereka mengirim email kepada Emir Dubai yang juga menjabat Perdana Menteri dan Menteri Pertahanan Uni Emirat Arab tersebut untuk meminta sumbangan.

    "Nama kampung mereka sama dengan nama kandang kuda terkenal, Godolphin, yang sekarang dimiliki oleh Syekh Mohammed," demikian dilaporkan koran lokal Cornwall Live.

    Richard Mckie dari Asosiasi Komunitas Godolphin Cross mengaku senang dengan bantuan itu. "Kami amat mengapresiasinya," ujarnya.

    Mereka membutuhkan 90 ribu pound sterling atau sekitar Rp 1,5 miliar untuk membeli gereja yang akan dijadikan pusat kegiatan masyarakat. Namun saat ini baru berhasil menghimpun dana 25 ribu pound sterling.

    Sejauh ini tak diketahui berapa jumlah sumbangan dari Syekh Mohammed, namun seperti kata Mckie, bantuannya cukup banyak.

    "Kami pikir tidak akan mendapat apa-apa, tapi kami menerima telepon dari Abu Dhabi," kata McKie, "Kami pikir sedang dikerjai, tapi ternyata bukan hoax dan benar diberi sumbangan."

    Seorang penduduk Godolphin Cros, Valerie Wallace, mengatakan gagasan menghubungi syekh itu merupakan upaya terakhir setelah gagal menggalang dana dari sumber-sumber lain.

    Sejauh ini belum ada komentar dari Syekh Dubai yang sudah diundang berkunjung ke desa tersebut.

    Kini warga Godolphin masih harus menggalang dana sebesar 350 ribu pound sterling atau sekitar Rp 6 miliar, untuk memperbaiki gereja yang akan dijadikan pusat kegiatan masyarakat itu.

     

     

    Saksikan juga video menarik berikut ini:


              Comment on Generous John!! and the Giant Jet! off to Haiti he fleww… by tiiz   
    Thanks!
              Comment on Generous John!! and the Giant Jet! off to Haiti he fleww… by Sahara   
    Good read. props
              As Haitians Picket Outside Courtroom: Guy Philippe Sentenced to Nine Years in Federal Prison   
    By: Kim Ives - Haiti Liberte

    Following a plea deal struck in April, U.S. District Judge Cecilia Altonaga on Jun. 21 in Miami sentenced former Haitian soldier, police officer, paramilitary leader, presidential candidate, and Senator-elect Guy Philippe, 49, to 108 months in U.S. Federal prison for laundering up to $3.5 million in drug money between 1999 and 2003.

    If he had gone to trial and been convicted of the other two charges against him for drug trafficking and “Engaging in Transactions Derived from Unlawful Activity,” Philippe could have been sent to jail for life. Instead, those charges were dropped, and, as recommended by prosecutors, he received the minimum sentence allowed in a plea bargain on the remaining charge of money laundering. With good conduct, he could get out of jail in seven and a half years, or 2024. Judge Altonaga said that Philippe would be on probation for three years after serving his sentence but will almost surely be deported back to Haiti.

    “There was also a $1.5 million judgement entered against him for forfeiture, so the government is allowed to go after assets up to the amount of $1.5 million,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Lynn M. Kirkpatrick after the sentencing hearing.

    The sentencing, which had originally been scheduled for Jul. 5, took all of ten minutes.Demonstrators organized by Veye Yo rallied outside the courthouse to say that the sentence was too lenient. Credit: Miami Herald

    Outside the courthouse, about a dozen demonstrators convened by the Miami-based Haitian popular organization Veye Yo, founded by the late Rev. Gérard Jean-Juste three decades ago, denounced Philippe’s close association with Haitian President Jovenel Moïse and condemned the sentence as too lenient.

    “We told the judge that nine years was too little and to add another nine to it,” said Veye Yo leader Tony Jean-Thénor. “Make the sentence 99 years, we said.”

    The demonstrators held up posters showing Philippe and Moïse embracing and campaigning together before the anemic Nov. 20, 2016 election in which they were both elected. On the picture was printed: “Guy Philippe and Jovenel Moïse: Drug-Dealing Brothers in Crime.”


    “We told the judge that nine years was too little and to add another nine to it,” said Veye Yo leader Tony Jean-Thénor. “Make the sentence 99 years, we said.”

    “Philippe is just the tip of the iceberg,” Jean-Thénor told Haïti Liberté. “Jovenel Moïse was the one who introduced former President Michel Martelly to fugitive drug trafficker Evinx Daniel [arrested in 2013 by Haitian police then released through the president’s intervention, he disappeared into the Haitian countryside], according to Sweet Micky [Martelly’s nickname] himself. The Senate President, Youri Latortue, is described as a drug dealer and Mafia boss by the U.S. Embassy itself in secret cables released by Wikileaks and Haïti Liberté. Guy Philippe was not the only candidate to use drug money to buy his way to a parliamentary post in the 2015 and 2016 elections which were boycotted by over 80% of Haitian voters.”

    Other demonstrators complained that Philippe had not been prosecuted for much more serious offenses than laundering money and running drugs. “His real crimes are, first, that he was instrumental in helping to overthrow the democratically elected government of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 2004,” said Simonville Estinphil, 65, a retired security guard. “Then, after the coup, in Cap Haïtien, he and his paramilitaries locked many Aristide supporters in a container and dropped them in the sea, drowning them. This was just the worst of many murders his thugs committed from 2001 to 2004. Then, in May of last year, his troops attacked the Aux Cayes police station, killing a police officer and wounding others. Guy Philippe has wronged Haiti in many ways. I hope he is judged there when he is sent back after doing his time in the States.”Guy Philippe’s “real crimes” were helping to overthrow Aristide, killing Aristide supporters, and killing and wounding policemen in 2016, said demonstrator Simonville Estinphil.

    Although dozens of Guy Philippe’s supporters traveled to Miami for his arraignment in January, to proclaim his innocence and demand his release, only one showed up on Jun. 21 for the sentencing.

    Mistaking the Veye Yo demonstrators for allies, the Philippe supporter took one of their signs and held it up. But when he heard their chant – “Nine years is not enough!” – he realized his mistake, dropped the sign, and ran away.

    Haitian police arrested Philippe outside a radio station in Port-au-Prince on Jan. 5, 2017, just days before he would have been sworn in as a Haitian Senator with legal immunity. He was extradited the same day to Miami, having eluded capture by U.S. authorities since he was indicted in 2005.

    “This case is the result of the ongoing efforts by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF), a partnership that brings together the combined expertise and unique abilities of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies,” wrote the office of Acting U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, Benjamin G. Greenberg, in a press release. “The principal mission of the OCDETF program is to identify, disrupt, dismantle and prosecute high-level members of drug trafficking, weapons trafficking, and money laundering organizations and enterprises.”
              Cholera Victims to Protest as UN Security Council Lands in Haiti   
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Contact: Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (New York and Boston): media@ijdh.org, +1-617-652-0876
    Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (Port-au-Prince): brian@ijdh.org, +509-3701-9879
    Cholera Victims to Protest as UN Security Council Lands in Haiti
    Call on UN to Deliver on Promised Response by MINUSTAH Withdrawal
    Atavist Test 8Wednesday, June 21, Boston, Port-au-Prince—Haitian cholera victims and their advocates called on the UN Security Council to deliver on the promise of a new, victim-centered approach to cholera during its visit to Haiti this week, by meeting directly with victims and committing to funding the $400 million initiative before MINUSTAH –the peacekeeping mission that caused the cholera epidemic—pulls out in October.
    “The UN’s apology and promises were promising in December,“ said Mario Joseph, Managing Attorney of the Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI) that has led the fight for justice for cholera victims. “But seven months later, with only a pittance raised for the so-called ‘New Approach’ and not a single promised consultation with the cholera victims, they look like empty public relations gestures. It is time for the UN to deliver.”
    The 15-member Security Council is in Haiti from June 22-24 to finalize the transition from MINUSTAH to a new mission focused on supporting justice that will be known as MINUJUSTH. The BAI announced two protests during the visit: one at the UN logistics base in Haiti on Thursday at 11 am, and a second one in Champs de Mars on Friday at 11. Advocates at the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (IJDH) simultaneously launched an international campaign calling on Member States to contribute their fair share to the New Approach by MINUSTAH’s closure. The campaign was launched on www.time2deliver.org.
    “The UN Member States brought MINUSTAH to Haiti, and they have a collective responsibility to pay for the damage caused by its peacekeeping operations,” said Sienna Merope-Synge, IJDH Staff Attorney. “They must either contribute their fair share, or agree to draw funds from the UN’s budget by MINUSTAH’s withdrawal.”
    To date, the UN has raised only 2% of the $400 million promised to implement its New Approach to Cholera in Haiti — a plan intended to eliminate cholera and provide remedies to the hundreds of thousands who have suffered from the epidemic.  As a result of the funding shortfall, implementation has stalled, and the UN has refused to begin even consulting with victims about the plan.
    On Tuesday, the Secretary-General appointed a new high-level special envoy, Josette Sheeran, to lead the fundraising efforts. Ms. Sheeran has a strong record of leadership, including as the former head of the World Food Program, and has previously raised billions of dollars for UN humanitarian efforts. But she is the third senior official to be assigned to the cholera issue. Her two predecessors did not succeed at raising any substantial funds.
    “Ms. Sheeran’s nomination is a welcome acknowledgement of the UN’s predicament, of launching a justice support mission while the organization continues to disdain its well-documented legal obligations to Haiti’s cholera victims,” said Brian Concannon, Executive Director of IJDH. “But her efforts and experience will bear no results unless the Secretary-General and Security Council Members provide leadership. They led enough to find $7 billion for MINUSTAH peacekeepers in a country that had no war, they now need to lead enough to find $400 million for a real cholera epidemic their troops introduced.”
    “Promoting rule of law requires abiding by the rule of law. The UN cannot succeed in its mission unless it sheds its double standard and complies with its obligations to repair the harms it caused,” said Beatrice Lindstrom, IJDH Staff Attorney.
    Cholera continues to take a grave toll in Haiti, infecting thousands each month, and killing at a rate of one Haitian each day. The UN estimates 30,000 Haitians will contract the disease this year, and the country remains vulnerable to a resurgence of deaths, with few improvements to water, sanitation and health care since the height of the epidemic. For the thousands of families who lost loved ones and livelihoods, the financial and emotional consequences of cholera continue to impose a crushing burden long after the disease has passed.

              Honoring Haiti’s Mothers and the late Father Gérard Jean-Juste   
    By: Aristide Foundation for Democracy



    UNIFA medical student assists doctor during Mobile Ciinic held on Haiti’s Mother’s Day weekend at the Aristide Foundation for Democracy.
    Please join us in honoring Haiti’s mothers! 
    In solidarity with Haiti’s Mother’s Day, and in memory of the late Father Gérard Jean-Juste, a Mobile Clinic was held at the Aristide Foundation for Democracy this past weekend. Medical and nursing students from UNIFA, the University of the Aristide Foundation, assisted doctors in performing medical exams for the hundreds of women seeking medical care that day. Father Gérard Jean-Juste, who died eight years ago on May 27, 2009, courageously dedicated his life fighting for human rights and social justice on behalf of Haiti’s poor and refugees. 
    Haitian mothers are like all mothers everywhere. They want their children to be healthy, go to school, grow up and have jobs and happy, healthy families of their own. In sum, they want their children to thrive and have dignity and respect in their society. 
    These are, after all, human rights as embodied in Haiti’s Constitution, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the United Nations Millennium Declaration (Sept. 2000) that states in its section on Freedom that 
    “Men and women have the right to live their lives and raise their children in dignity, free from hunger and from the fear of violence, oppression or injustice.” 
    However, the number of doctors in Haiti remains woefully inadequate with less than two doctors per 10,000 habitants. Infant and child mortality remains high and women die in childbirth at a rate of twenty-five times higher than women in the U.S. In most rural areas nurses are the primary health care provider. Only approximately twenty-five dentists are graduated each year throughout the whole country and until UNIFA created the first degree program in physical therapy, there were no higher education Haiti trained physical therapists. The 2010 catastrophic earthquake made evident how critical this field is but to date many hospitals in Haiti don’t have units for physical therapy. 

    Hundreds of women participate in Mother’s Day event at the Aristide Foundation for Democracy and access free medical exams and treatment at the Mobile Clinic held that day.
    When former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned to Haiti in 2011, he was determined to reopen his university to continue to carry out his vision and commitment to provide a human-rights based model of education as the building block for effective change in Haiti. 
    UNIFA, the university of the Aristide Foundation, is unique with its emphasis on human rights, dignity, and inclusiveness as the path to a new and just Haiti. (See UNIFA’s Guiding Principles.) In amplifying her husband’s emphasis on dignity, Mildred Aristide framed the importance of dignity to the future of Haiti as, 
    “…resistance is bound to a powerful will to affirm a shared humanity rooted in dignity…This notion of dignity embraces self-determination. People as subject and never object of their history.” 
    UNIFA works on all these fronts. To provide a quality, higher education to all qualified students without exclusion, UNIFA’s tuition is much less than other private universities and is able to draw students from throughout Haiti because of its dormitory that currently houses sixty students. UNIFA is a fully accredited Haitian university offering degrees in seven disciplines: Medicine, Law, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Dentistry, Engineering and Continuing Education and currently has 1,300 matriculated students studying at its Tabarre campus in Haiti. Adhering to the State prescribed curriculum and educational requirements, UNIFA supplements course work with additional classes and lectures utilizing its own prominent professors as well as visiting local or foreign professors and experts, including Cuban doctors, who share different approaches and experiences. 
    “Students gain their own perspective and state of mind. UNIFA provides excellence in education and a safe space for learning where students can think about issues confronting Haiti and seek solutions that they will ultimately contribute to resolve,” Mrs. Aristide explains. 
    UNIFA is a stepping-stone for Haiti, where professionals are trained inside Haiti and students can control their own destiny and forge their own future. Through community service, participation in mobile clinics, gaining practical experience in clinics and hospitals, students build relationships in the professional world before they graduate and get to see the whole range of possible work in the medical field, including research and other specialties. 
    Moving UNIFA and a new Haiti forward each year! The first class of UNIFA law students will graduate this September. Sixth-year medical students are doing internships at state and Partners in Health hospitals in Delmas, Mirabalais and Gonaives. Fifth-year medical students are gaining practical experience at the Hospital Bernard Mevs. UNIFA’s nursing students are gaining practical experience in clinics and hospitals throughout the Port-au-Prince area. Physical therapy students are in their third year and UNIFA hopes to offer a masters program in physical therapy in the near future. As of March 2017 the construction of the anatomy lab building was completed and is being used to practice dissection. The cafeteria will be moving into a new modern structure. UNIFA’s engaging Thursday lecture series are very successful and the annual Science Week held in May enjoyed guest lecturers from diverse fields who discussed proactively the realities of emergencies and disasters facing Haiti. 
    UNIFA’s Campaign for Dignity. Next UNIFA needs to complete its construction of its Diagnostic & Primary Care Center so students can get the full range of practical experience while also serving families living in this growing region. It is the first component of UNIFA’s teaching hospital. As Dr. Paul Farmer, of Partners in Health, who teaches at UNIFA and serves as the President of our not-for-profit explains, “You can’t teach medical education without a hospital.” 
    UNIFA needs your help to get this done. Once the construction of the Diagnostic & Primary Care Center is completed it will need staff, furnishings, medical equipment, and operating costs. UNIFA dental students will need dental chairs and physical therapy students will need beds. Until the teaching hospital is built, patients needing more advanced care or surgery will be received by the Hospital Bernard Mevs, UNIFA’s partner organization. 
    Let’s honor Haiti’s mothers together. Please help UNIFA build a new Haiti. Help UNIFA construct its Diagnostic & Primary Care Center, the first phase of its teaching hospital. 

    UNIFA’s medical students assist doctors during an earlier Mobile Clinic at the Aristide Foundation for Democracy.

    Children at the Mobile Clinic held at the Aristide Foundation for Democracy. In the background UNIFA’s medical and nursing students assist doctors and nurses in examining the hundreds of women seeking medical care during Haiti Mother’s Day weekend event.

              Thousands of Haitian Workers Are on Strike Against Foreign-Owned Sweatshops   
    By: Jeff Abbott - In These Times


    Thousands of textile workers in Haiti have stopped work in factories and taken to the streets to demand of improved working conditions in the country’s maquiladora export industry. For more than three weeks, workers have mobilized to demand higher wages, an eight-hour workday and protections against increased quotas across the industrial centers of Port-au-Prince, Carrefour, Ounaminthe and Caracol.

    The strike follows the annual commemoration of International Workers’ Day.

    Currently, workers receive a daily wage of roughly 300 gourdes, or about 4.77 U.S. dollars (USD), for a day’s work. Strikers are demanding that the wage is raised to 800 gourdes, or 12.72 USD—and that the eight-hour day be respected.

    Workers face poor labor conditions in the country’s assembly-line factories, where they produce textiles for large U.S. companies such as Levi Jeans and Fruit of the Loom. Factory owners have long called for the use of violence against workers’ rights activists in Haiti and fired anyone known to associate with the unions.

    The workers are supported by a coalition of independent labor unions, SOTA-BO and PLASIT-BO, which represent textile workers. These unions are associated with the independent worker’s movement, Batay Ouvriye, or Workers’ Fight.

    “We cannot work with dignity for 300 gourdes per day,” said Didier Dominique, the spokesman for Batay Ouvriye, in an interview over the phone. Dominique points out that it is impossible for a family to survive on the low wages, in part due to the out of control inflation in the Caribbean country.

    "It's gotten to the point where I can't take care of my son. I don't see any future in this," said Esperancia Mernavil, a textile worker associated with the Gosttra union, told the Associated Press.

    On May 19, strikers shut down dozens of factories and temporarily blocked the road to the Toussaint Louverture International airport in Port-au-Prince as part of their actions. They then marched in the direction of the Presidential Palace before they were met by riot police, who deployed tear gas against the workers.

    The Association of Industries of Haiti has denounced the strike, stating that the strikes are being led by isolated “militants and syndicalists.” They also levied accusations against strikers stating that they attacked the factories, as well as their fellow workers within, leading to the temporary closure of factories on May 19.

    The workers have maintained their willingness to continue the strike, but cracks in their mobilization are beginning to show. Haiti’s constant crisis of poverty makes it difficult for the strike to maintain momentum over the long run.

    “After three weeks of protests, people are getting tired,” said Dominique. “Families are beginning to have financial issues.”

    But Batay Ouviye and the other unions are already planning their next actions in the event that the strike comes to an end.

    The current strike continues years of actions to demand an increase in wages and improved labor conditions for textile and factory workers. The first minimum wage was established in the 1980s, and it was raised again in 1995. Since then, the minimum wage has not kept up with inflation.

    “Every year it gets more and more difficult to survive,” said Dominique. “The inflation takes more and more of the worker’s money. There is no stability. Because of this the workers are demanding higher wages.”

    In 2008, the Haitian parliament discussed raising the minimum wage in order to keep up with inflation. But these efforts were derailed by pressure from the United States, with the U.S. Embassy telling officials that any efforts to raise the minimum wage would hurt the economy and threaten trade agreements.

    Secret embassy cables exposed by Wikileaks in 2011 highlight the collusion between the United States and businesses to keep the minimum wage low. These revelations led The Nation Magazine and Haiti Liberte to conclude, "U.S. Embassy in Haiti worked closely with factory owners contracted by Levi’s, Hanes, and Fruit of the Loom to aggressively block a paltry minimum wage increase."

    Despite the pushback from the United States and companies, the Haitian Parliament successfully raised the minimum wage to roughly 5.11 U.S. dollars for an eight-hour workday in 2014. Yet, this raise does little to assist families that teeter on the poverty line.

    “The companies take millions of dollars from the country, and we are left working in poor conditions for little money,” said Dominique. “It is slavery all over again.”
              Reuters: Haiti workers protest minimum wage as managers threaten exit   
    By: Makini Brice - Reuters

    Hundreds of Haitian textile workers took to the streets on Monday to demand a higher minimum wage as managers of textile factories threatened to leave the country if the government did not clamp down on demonstrations.

    Haiti has pinned some of its economic growth hopes on the textile industry, which accounts for 90 percent of its exports, according to export.gov, a website managed by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

    The United States has granted Haiti a preferential trade deal, creating some 40,000 jobs, the Association of Haitian Industries said last November. Products made there are shipped to major U.S. retailers like Walmart and Target.

    However, spurred by a recent hike in fuel prices and surging inflation, textile workers have begun protesting over pay.

    On Monday, they marched across town from an industrial park near the airport to the Ministry of Social Affairs in downtown Port-au-Prince, singing and waving signs with slogans like "Long live the independent fight for factory workers."

    Workers in textile factories currently earn 300 Haitian gourdes ($4.77). They are demanding a raise to 800 gourdes a day.

    An annual report seen by Reuters from the High Council of Salaries, which is tasked with recommending changes to the minimum wage, had proposed an increase to 400 gourdes a day. But it was never released due to a dispute within the council.

    Last week, six companies wrote to the office of Prime Minister Jack Guy Lafontant, demanding the government stop the protests, in letters that became public on Monday.

    "Total cost competitiveness, quality production and the proximity (to) the U.S. were the reasons we selected Haiti while betting on major improvements on salary predictability and political stability," the companies wrote in identical letters.

    "If those benefits no longer (exist), we will have to make other strategic (arrangements to) move from Haiti to other places where there is a clear state strategy to boost investments and protect investors while creating and protecting decent jobs," they added.

    The six companies that signed the letters were MGA Haiti S.A., Astro Carton d'Haiti S.A., Haiti Cheung Won S.A., Textile Youm Kwang S.A., Pacific Sports Haiti S.A. and Wilbes Haitian S.A.

    Earlier this month, Roosevelt Bellevue, minister of social affairs and labor, expressed a similar view.

    "If the salary becomes too high, companies will leave and go to the Dominican Republic or Nicaragua," he told reporters.

    Representatives from MGA Haiti and Astro Carton d'Haiti confirmed they had sent the letters, and said they had lost between $50,000 and $60,000 due to the protests. The other four textile companies could not be reached immediately for comment. (Additional reporting by Robenson Sanon; Editing by Leslie Adler)
              Ibi Zoboi On Literacy and Her Work with Haitian American Teens   
    Debut author and SLJTeen Live! speaker Ibi Zoboi talks about her writing initiatives for teens in immigrant communities.
              Man denies murder charges in 2011 slayings of sisters   
    BOSTON (AP) — A man who was arrested in Haiti in connection with the 2011 deaths of his ex-girlfriend and her sister in Boston has pleaded not guilty to murder charges.
              For sale - Haiti Radio Choir & Orchestra - Music in Mahogony... - $19   

    Elmira 97437, OR, United States
    Haiti Radio Choir & Orchestra Music in Mahogony lp Details = Hard to Find lp - Haitian Music - Folk - Patriotic - A Blend of French and Creole - lp is Nm- - Cover is Clean ...Ex Country = usa Mono or Stereo = M Label and Number = Men for Mission Society - Year = 1966 Our item Number and Location = 500109 - lp27 us Buyers see shipping and handling tab. - ...
    ebay.com

              Transformers: The Last Knight    
    Michael Bay’s $200 million cry for help

    Ah yes, we meet again, Michael Bay, my old nemesis. My Nemesis Prime, you might say. That's what hero truck-bot Optimus Prime changes his name to when he turns evil in Bay's latest bit of deviltry, The Last Knight. ...

    *sigh*

    Okay look, y'all. I gotta be honest. My heart's not really in this. I know, I love writing a good Michael Bay takedown as much as you like reading them — probably more, if I'm being honest. I've been doing them for years. Back in the day, Chris Herrington, the Flyer's former film editor, would assign me to do the Michael Bay movies, because he knew I hated them. I've had a Michael Bay-sized chip on my shoulder since 1998's Armageddon. How do you mess up a movie about heroic astronauts trying to save the earth from an asteroid? There were so many ways. Then there was Pearl Harbor. How do you mess that up? This is the film where Ben Affleck gets on a train to go from New York to London, neither of which is anywhere NEAR Pearl Harbor.

    I include that tidbit in every Michael Bay review, because I still haven't gotten over it.

    And now, another Transformers movie. The fifth one. Giant Robots Go to England. At least they don't take a train.

    I don't think Michael Bay's heart is in it any more, either. Back when he had Will Smith and Martin Lawrence demolishing Haitian neighborhoods in Bad Boys 2, at least he seemed like he was having fun with it. In the nonsensical opening scene — in which it is revealed that the secret to King Arthur's success turns out to be, you guessed it, Transformers — Merlin (Stanley Tucci) takes a big swig of whiskey before staggering into a crashed alien spaceship to forge an alliance with a giant robot. It has the feeling of a confessional moment for Bay: Oh boy. Here we go again. ...

    Bay's been watching Game of Thrones and obviously missing the point. You like flawed characters caught in impossible situations making hard choices? How about a bored looking Markey Mark just kind of floating through the frame while animated piles of scrap metal scrape together in the background? To say Mark Wahlberg is phoning it in overstates his engagement. Wahlberg is leaving a voicemail for the audience. He was hoping you wouldn't pick up.

    As a longtime Bay watcher, he's always been indifferent to the audience's suffering, but in last year's 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi, I detected something new: a seething resentment of the audience. The Transformers Reaction Force, a special forces group led by Santos (Santiago Cabrera), who can't seem to decide what side he's on, seems imported from that movie. It's like Bay's sneering misogyny, evident in his treatment of Vivian Wembley (Laura Haddock), the Oxford English Lit professor who can't seem to speak in complete sentences, has been extended to the entire world. Our alleged hero Cade speaks in Trumpian word salad, insulting any and everyone he comes into contact with. For Bay, there's only one use for words: busting chops. Expressing dominance.

    There's a general shoddiness to the whole endeavor. A Goonies-like group of kids is introduced early, only to just wander off without explanation. Bay has always had a knack for explaining things that didn't need explaining and not explaining big things like, "Where did those five kids go? Did they die in the robot apocalypse along with the tens of millions others alluded to but never seen?" The same stock footage of fighter planes peeling off to attack is used over and over again in the final battle, which itself is inexplicably ripped off from last year's epic flop Independence Day: Resurgence.

    "It's just big, dumb fun!" might be a valid defense against my half-hearted critical barbs, except for one thing: No one is having any fun, least of all Michael Bay. It's not even fun to hate-watch Transformers: The Last Knight. At this point, even writing this review feels like enabling bad behavior. As a three-headed robot dragon swoops in, breathing fire, King Arthur screams, "This is what the end looks like!" And I can only say I hope so.



              Arabie Saoudite : le Roi Salman verrouille sa succession   

    Publié sur Arabie Saoudite : le Roi Salman verrouille sa succession

    Nous souhaitions revenir sur un évènement qui s’est déroulé il y a près d’une semaine en Arabie Saoudite, et sur lequel la presse « main stream » n’a guère insisté, malgré son...

    Cet article Arabie Saoudite : le Roi Salman verrouille sa succession est apparu en premier sur Parti Anti Sioniste.


              Lafontant accorde une priorité à la construction de l'HUEH   
    Le Premier Ministre haïtien, Jack Guy Lafontant, est satisfait de l'avancement des travaux de construction de l'hôpital de l'Université d'Etat d'Haiti (HUEH).  Lors d'une visite d'inspection
              Video: UMW – International Child Care Haiti   
    International Child Care Haiti from Nile on Vimeo.
              The 20 best things to do this weekend, pre-Independence edition   
    [Ed note: Reminder, we now have a separate roundup for activism-focused events, which we encourage you to check out here.] 1. Fancy yourself on an island at The Mizik Ayiti! Summer Concert Series, featuring Haitian artists Sabine Blaizin, Rodney “Okai” Fleurimont, Veroneque Ignace, and Sherley Davilmar. (Friday, Westbrook Memorial Gardens, FREE) 2. Fall into a vintage fantasy at The Champagne Riot, with old-timey burlesque from Angie Pontani, The Maine Attraction, Topher Bousquet, and more, plus jazz from the Gelber & Manning Band. (Friday, Guadalupe Inn, $20) 3. Marvel at marvelous moves at Garth Fagan Dance, showcasing an innovative blend of modern dance, ballet, and Afro-Caribbean dance. (Friday, Prospect Park, FREE) 4. Giggle demurely at LAWL, an all-female comedy show with Kady Ruth Ashcraft, Mary Jo Bono, Suraiyah Ortiz, and Lillian Devane. (Friday, New Women Space, $5) 5. Hit the hight notes at LoftOpera's Pergolesi and Vivaldi, with a staged production of Stabat Mater as well as arias and chamber works by Vivaldi. (Friday… Read More >
              7994th Security Council Meeting: Security Council Mission to Haiti   
    Successful visit to Haiti affirms international commitment, helps to shape new United Nations presence, Security Council president tells members at 7994th meeting.
              UN / HAITI REPORT   
    Reporting to the Security Council on a recent visit to Haiti, the Council’s president said “the issue of cholera was mentioned as a serious concern which required our attention in every meeting.” UNIFEED /MINUSTAH
              Senior Finance and Operations Director – Cap Haitien, Haiti - Winrock International - Little Rock, AR   
    Forestry and Natural Resource Management Group. The project will directly support and contribute to the Government of Haiti (GOH)-led efforts to manage healthy...
    From Winrock International - Tue, 30 May 2017 11:30:38 GMT - View all Little Rock, AR jobs
              Gender Specialist - Cap Haitien, Haiti - Winrock International - Little Rock, AR   
    Forestry and Natural Resource Management Group. The project will directly support and contribute to the Government of Haiti (GOH)-led efforts to manage healthy...
    From Winrock International - Tue, 30 May 2017 11:30:36 GMT - View all Little Rock, AR jobs
              5 of the most scenic ziplines around the world   

    Zip lining is a thrilling experience, offering spectacular views of unique destinations. When deciding where to take your next super speed experience, consider a location with an unusually fantastic view through unexpected terrain. Vast gorges, mountain tops and turquoise water add a secondary depth to an already exhilarating adventure. Dragon’s Breath in Labadee, Haiti Only […]

    5 of the most scenic ziplines around the world is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

    The post 5 of the most scenic ziplines around the world appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.


              After ‘successful’ visit to Haiti, Security Council notes window of opportunity for reforms   
    Haiti has a window of opportunity to implement reforms necessary to bring the Caribbean country onto a path of stability and development, the United Nations Security Council President said today.
              Charlotteans worship God in these languages, too   

    In how many languages do people in Charlotte worship God these days?

    I listed 20 that I knew of in a column last month. I should have said 21 because – as some of you pointed out – I failed to include what’s still the most prevalent worship language in town: English.

    Oops! (Since the 1930s, that’s been an English word for acknowledging a blunder.)

    My other mistake: I should have said that Haitian congregations here have services in Creole, not French.

    I also invited you to alert me about other worship languages here that I was not aware of. Thanks to those who told me about:

    22. Burmese. And 23. Hakha Chin.

    Refugee congregations from war-torn Myanmar have been worshiping at Park Road Baptist Church and at Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic Church.

    24. Portuguese.

    Brazilian members have services at Cokesbury United Methodist Church.

    25. American Sign Language (ASL).

    At Chapel for the Deaf, housed at Ascension Lutheran Church, worshipers pray and sing with their hands.

    26. French. 27. Nepali (from Nepal). And 28. Tamil (from Sri Lanka and India).

    Jehovah’s Witnesses have meetings available in many languages, including these.

    Mass en Español

    Speaking of language, I also ran across this fascinating factoid in my reporting:

    Nearly 30 percent of Catholic parishes now celebrate Mass in a language other than English – a 7 percent increase since 2000, according to “The Changing Face of U.S. Catholic Parishes” study from the Center for Applied Research at Georgetown University.

    In the 19th and early 20th centuries, waves of Irish, Italian, Polish and other immigrant groups found refuge in a Catholic Church. The descendants of that first generation of immigrants have long since become part of the broad American mainstream.

    But today, new waves of immigrants, particularly from Latin America, are again enriching the Catholic Church in the U.S.

    To be sure, many immigrants from traditionally Catholic countries such as Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras are finding spiritual homes in non-Catholic churches – Pentecostal, evangelical, mainline Protestant and Mormon.

    By 2050, Hispanics are expected to account for 60 percent of Catholics in the U.S. They already make up about half of the more than 340,000 Catholics in the 46-county Diocese of Charlotte.


    -- Tim Funk

              In increasingly diverse Charlotte, God goes by many names    

    Two newsy items I came across recently got me wondering: In how many languages do people in Charlotte worship God these days?

    I counted at least 20 – not a surprise when you consider how diverse our faith community has become. And I bet some of you could add to my list. (And hopefully will – see below.)

    Those two newsy items:


    • At 7 p.m. on Thursday (Dec. 11),  thousands of Spanish-speaking Catholics are expected to converge on Bojangles Coliseum, 2700 E. Independence Blvd., for the annual celebration of the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe – or “Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe.”


    • A Polish-language Mass will be celebrated at 3 p.m. on Dec. 21 at St. Matthew Catholic Church, 8015 Ballantyne Commons Parkway.


    To be sure, most local houses of worship still send their prayers up to “God.”

    But, all over town, the Supreme Being is increasingly invoked by other names: “Dios” (in Spanish); “Gott” (German); “Elohim” and “Adonai” (Hebrew); “Allah” (Arabic); “Deus” (Latin); “Bóg” (Polish); “Theos” (Greek); “Dieu” (French); and many others.

    I consulted a few folks in town who chart Charlotte’s growing diversity – including historian Tom Hanchett of the Levine Museum of the New South – and came up with a list of the languages of worship in the Charlotte area:


    • The Catholic Diocese has parishes where some or all of the Masses are in Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean and Latin. A few parishes periodically host Masses in other languages, including Polish and Tagalog (from the Philippines).


    • Orthodox Christian churches have services that are partly or totally said in Greek, Russian, Serbian, Armenian and Arabic.


    • The Jewish synagogues include prayers in Hebrew.


    • Muslims attending masjids, or mosques, are led in prayer in Arabic.


    • Various Protestant denominations – Lutheran, Methodist, Presbyterian and Baptist – have immigrant congregations that worship in German, Khmer (the language of Cambodia), Korean, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Tagalog.


    • Buddhist temples are the spiritual homes to immigrant communities that speak Chinese, Lao (from Laos), Vietnamese and Khmer.


    • The sacred language at the Hindu temples is Sanskrit.


    • Haitian churches have services in French.


    • Immigrant churches with congregations from African countries worship in such indigenous language groups as Akan (from Ghana) and Amharic (from Ethiopia).



    OK, that’s our list. What languages have we left out? Email them (and any related houses of worship) to: tfunk@charlotteobserver.com

    -- Tim Funk
              re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean   
    Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
              UN to check human rights record for Sri Lankan peacekeepers   

    United Nations: The UN will require Sri Lankan troops to undergo "enhanced screening" for human rights violations going back to the final years of the civil war before they can be deployed as peacekeepers.

    "We need to have an enhanced screening process for Sri Lankan peacekeepers," Farhan Haq, deputy spokesperson for Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, said Friday.

    "That`s different from other screening processes that we have."

    "For any future deployment, the government of Sri Lanka will have to share with the Secretariat the personal history information and military service records since 2005 for all personnel Sri Lanka intends to deploy," he explained.

    The period of scrutiny includes the final four years of the civil war that ended in 2009 with the rout of the Tamil Tigers when thousands of civilians were killed amid reports of widespread human rights violations.

    A panel appointed by former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon reported that both the Sri Lankan army and the Tamil Tiger rebels had committed serious human rights violations and some of the actions could amount to war crimes.

    Haq said that the Sri Lankan government will have to "to certify in writing that it`s not aware of any allegations against any unit member having been involved by act or omission in the commission of any acts that amount to violations of international human rights law or international humanitarian law," as a condition for deployment.

    The deputy spokesperson was responding to reporters` questions about sexual assaults and abuses allegedly carried out by Sri Lankan peacekeepers in Haiti, putting the focus on two areas that the UN has faced severe criticisms.

    Several instances of sexual assault and exploitation, especially of children, by peacekeepers of various nationalities have marred its reputation prompting stronger measures to enforce a zero tolerance policy. Moreover, Haiti was hit by a cholera epidemic that killed about 10,000 people and it was blamed on peacekeepers from Nepal.

    Asked about the appropriateness of having him investigate abuse allegations against a Sri Lankan peacekeeper, Haq said: "When it comes to investigations, we hope that all investigations are conducted in a credible manner. If not, that would be a matter of concern."

    Section: 
    Yes
    News Source: 
    Facebook Instant Article: 
    No

              Terremoto ad Haiti   
    Quattro scosse di cui una di oltre i 7 gradi Richter hanno colpito la capitale di Haiti, Port-Au-Prince, provocando migliaia di vittime. E' stato di emergenza.
              Terremoto ad Haiti: e' stato di emergenza   
    Quattro scosse di cui una di oltre i 7 gradi Richter hanno colpito oggi la capitale di Haiti, Port-Au-Prince, provocando migliaia di vittime. Il terremoto e' stato avvertito anche nella base navale di Guantanamo, a Cuba. Tre dei quattro ospedali di Port-Au-Prince sono crollati e il sovraffollamento...
              For sale - rare nike air pegasus 31 wings glow in dark black... - $52   

    Zetland 2017, Australia
    Posting to: Americas, Europe, Asia, Australia Excludes: Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Liberia, Libya, Mauritius, Western Sahara, Iraq, Lebanon, Turkey, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan Republic, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Guam, Guernsey, Jersey, British Virgin Islands, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Macau
    ebay.com.au

              Go   

    Wow, life is most definitely a GO GO GO venture. This world has so much to offer and so many directions that continuously pull. Yet, I have to be reminded to take a moment and stop. Yeah you heard that right, STOP; everything. In this, we realize what God really has to offer us. Sometimes this is an opportunity. MidAmerica sends out trips every year locally, nationally, and worldwide that impact communities immensely. These range from Haiti, Arizona, and Africa. They also encompass construction, medical care, and education. The best part is that these trips are student and sponsor led.[...]

    The post Go appeared first on MNU Blogs.


               Three Months after Haiti Quake, Life Still Perilous for Children    

    Save the Children Has Aided More Than 550,000 People, Three-Month Report Outlines Next Steps

    (PRWeb April 09, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Save_the_Children/Haiti_Earthquake/prweb3854204.htm


               Save the Children Reaches More than 500,000 Children and Adults Two Months After Haiti Earthquake   

    Rainy Season Increases Misery Level for Children and Families, Adds Risk of Waterborne Illnesses

    (PRWeb March 13, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Save_the_Children/Haiti_Earthquake/prweb3723404.htm


               Save the Children Opens First Temporary School for Quake-Affected Haitian Children    

    Agency Plans to Set up Around 300 Temporary Classrooms Over Coming Weeks

    (PRWeb March 06, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/savethechildren/haiti_temporary_schools/prweb3694414.htm


               Save the Children Provides Songs with Lifesaving Health and Nutrition Advice to Haitian Radio Stations   

    Creole Songs with Tips on Breastfeeding and Basic Hygiene to Help Save Babies&#39; Lives During Upcoming Rainy Season

    (PRWeb February 17, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Save-the-Children/Haiti/prweb3612874.htm


               One Month after Major Quake, Ongoing Crises for Haitian Children   

    Save the Children is Providing Food, Water and Essentials to about 300,000 Children and Families

    (PRWeb February 10, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/save-the-children/haiti-relief/prweb3586994.htm


               Save the Children Supplies 30,000 Haitian Children and Families with Rice at Sites in Marissant and Tabarre, Will Continue for Two Weeks   

    The global humanitarian organization Save the Children, in partnership with the World Food Program (WFP), successfully distributed critically needed food supplies over the past two days in Marissant and Tabarre to about 30,000 people.

    (PRWeb February 04, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Save_Children/Haiti/prweb3561364.htm


               Two Weeks After Haiti Quake, Save the Children Helps More Than 105,000 Children and Families with Food, Medicines, Basic Supplies   

    Two weeks after a devastating magnitude-7.0 earthquake rocked Haiti, the global humanitarian organization Save the Children has reached more than 105,000 children and adults, providing lifesaving food, medicines and supplies.

    (PRWeb January 28, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Haiti_Quake/Save_the_Children/prweb3530694.htm


               Save the Children Launches Radio Outreach Program in Haiti to Promote Newborn, Infant Health   

    Local Broadcasts in Creole Urge New Mothers to Nourish Infants Through Breast Milk; Cautions Against Baby Formula Made with Dirty Water

    (PRWeb January 26, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/save_the_children/haiti_earthquake/prweb3517804.htm


               Save the Children Partners with AmeriCares to Treat More than 85,000 Haitians   

    Connecticut Relief Agencies Join Forces to Deliver Medical Aid

    (PRWeb January 26, 2010)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/01/prweb3508674.htm


              re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean   
    Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    Particular emphasis is placed on the collection of autonomous revenue for the municipalities and federations, citizen involvement, effective service delivery,...
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              Comment on Hollywood Declared Hillary Clinton Worst Presidential Candidate in History by Shayne Heffernan   
    So here are the Top 10 double-dealing, dishonest discoveries uncovered so far. 1. Mrs. Clinton had cozy and improper relationship with the mainstream media. CNN contributor and then adviser of the Democratic National Committee Donna Brazile gave the Clinton campaign advanced notice of a CNN town hall question that she thought may give Mrs. Clinton pause. Mrs. Clinton’s campaign lauded a New York Times reporter for “teeing up” stories for them, and ABC’s George Stephanopoulos for hammering home their talking points. The Boston Globe helped Mrs. Clinton’s team maximize her presence in New England during the primaries and CNBC’s John Harwood bragged to them about dogging Donald Trump during a Republican primary debate he moderated. 2. The State Department paid special attention to “Friends of Bill.” After the massive 2010 Haiti earthquake, a senior aide to then-Secretary of StateClinton repeatedly gave special attention to those identified by the abbreviations “FOB” (Friends of Bill) or “WJC VIPs” (William Jefferson Clinton VIPs), referring to the former president. The emails show Mrs. Clinton’s State Department prioritized and benefited Mr. Clinton’s friends in the $10 billion recovery effort. The State Department also polled the popularity of Mr. Clinton in Haiti and shared the results with him. 3. Mrs. Clinton argued for “a hemispheric common market with open trade and open borders.” Mrs. Clinton’s dream for America looks a lot like the European Union. She reportedly told investors in a paid speech to Brazilian Banco Itau in 2013: “My dream is a hemispheric common market, with open trade and open borders, sometime in the future with energy that’s as green and sustainable as we can get it, powering growth and opportunity for every person in the hemisphere.” Without borders, there are no countries, including the United States. 4. The Clinton campaign was in touch with Department of Justice officials regarding the release of her emails.Brian Fallon, Mrs. Clinton’s spokesman and former Justice Department staffer, appeared to have discussions with sources inside the DOJ about ongoing open records lawsuits requesting access to her emails while serving as secretary of state. In an email from May 2015, Mr. Fallon said that “DOJ folks” had “informed” him about the upcoming status conference in one of the lawsuits. 5. The Clinton Camp was tipped off to the release of the Benghazi emails. In April 2015, Clinton campaign Deputy Communications Director Kristina Schake referred to a “tip” from a source regarding when the State Department planned to release Mrs. Clinton’s Benghazi emails. Mrs. Clinton’s lawyer Heather Samuelson followed up on the tip, writing: “Latest: Still aiming for Friday, but potential it gets delayed until early next week because still moving through interagency review process. Will check back tomorrow and keep you posted. Quick update on this — DOS says the release of the 300 will likely happen on Thurs or Friday. Will keep you posted as I hear anything further on my end. Thx.” 6. Mrs. Clinton admitted sometimes her public and private positions differ. In a 2013 speech before the National Multi-Housing Council, Mrs. Clinton indicated her public positions may differ with her private positions, because politics is an ugly business. “Politics is like sausage being made,” Mrs. Clinton said. “It is unsavory, and it always has been that way, but we usually end up where we need to be. But if everybody’s watching, you know, all of the backroom discussions and the deals, you know, then people get a little nervous, to say the least. So, you need both a public and a private position.” 7. Mrs. Clinton’s spokesman mocked Catholics and evangelicals as “severely backwards.” Hacked emails show Mrs. Clinton’s campaign spokeswoman Jennifer Palmieri and other Clinton allies openly talking about Catholics being “severely backwards” and charging that they don’t know “what the hell they’re talking about.” The April 2011 discussion between Ms. Palmieri and John Halpin, a senior fellow at the liberal Center for American Progress, mocks media mogul Rupert Murdoch for raising his children in the Catholic Church and said that most “powerful elements” in the conservative movement are all Catholic. 8. Mrs. Clinton admitted she has a hard time relating to the struggles of the middle class. In a 2014 speech for Goldman Sachs and BlackRock, Mrs. Clinton admitted her riches and public persona lifestyle isolated her from the financial struggles of most of the country, saying her memories of her childhood is how she connects now to everyday Americans. “Obviously, I’m kind of far removed because the life I’ve lived and the economic, you know, fortunes that my husband and I now enjoy,” Mrs. Clinton said of relating to the middle class. 9. Mrs. Clinton campaign used Benghazi as a distraction from the email scandal. Mrs. Clinton’s campaign tried to make her email scandal disappear during the Benghazi probe by trying to conflate and confuse the two separate incidents. Mr. Podesta told aides in March 2015 to steer the media’s attention from the email scandal to the House Benghazi investigation, which they felt had already been painted in the media as a Republican witch hunt. 10. The Clinton Team strategized on how to delay releasing emails, knowing it was against the law. After receiving a subpoena for her emails, Clinton insider Phillipe Reines in March 2015 discussed strategies to use as an excuse not to release all of her emails. It appeared to constitute a conscious effort of the Clinton Camp to frustrate and delay a congressional subpoena. Mr. Reines said of the emails: “Not flippantly, and maybe just from Nick’s [Merrill, Clinton spokesman] mouth — but rather than going around on how to release the 55k let’s just be for what’s happening and use this as an excuse. Because we can say even if State has equities, not providing them would put her in legal jeopardy OR we can say happy for them to have it, happy for them to have them as soon as State is comfortable.”
              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    In order to do so, the CMRP-DATIP and the partner municipalities must build internal capacity among staff. Please apply by Sunday, July 9, 2017....
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              After Hurricane, UN Assessment Finds 800,000 Haitians In Dire Need Of Immediate Food Assistance   
    A man works to clear downed trees from his property near the western town of Leoganne, after Hurricane Matthew made landfall in Haiti. He lost his crops and livestock. NEW YORK, NY, U.S.A. (UN) -- An assessment conducted by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World....
              WASH in Health Care Facilities Assessment Consultant - Save the Children - US Headquarters - Remote   
    Development and roll out of MCSP’s Clean Clinic Approach (CCA) in Haiti, DRC, and Mozambique is employing a systematic approach to strengthening a health system...
    From Indeed - Mon, 20 Mar 2017 18:21:02 GMT - View all Remote jobs
              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    Particular emphasis is placed on the collection of autonomous revenue for the municipalities and federations, citizen involvement, effective service delivery,...
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    Guide DATIP's project manager and municipal engineers in carrying out and/or monitoring a certain number of already identified/launched projects;...
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    FCM covers all travel, lodging and meal costs through funding provided by Global Affairs Canada. Please apply by Sunday, July 9, 2017....
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    The goal of the Municipal Cooperation Program is to help partners develop more transparent, effective and sustainable local government....
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              Man denies murder charges in 2011 slayings of sisters   
    BOSTON (AP) — A man who was arrested in Haiti in connection with the 2011 deaths of his ex-girlfriend and her sister in Boston has pleaded n…
              St. Gerard Botanica catches on fire in Little Haiti   

    City of Miami firefighters extinguished a fire at the St. Gerard Botanica in Miami's Little Haiti neighborhood early Saturday morning. 

    Miami Fire Rescue firefighters responded to the store at 5901 NE 2nd Ave., about 2:30 a.m. The store sells herbal remedies, charms, incense, candles and other items used for Voodoo rituals or treatments. 

    "The quickness of the crews showing up and actually forcing entry through the metal doors and then making a good stop on the fire rather quickly kept the rest of the adjacent businesses from getting damaged," Capt. David Nunez said. 

    Firefighters believe a candle that was left burning unattended was likely what set the store on fire. 

    The followers of Voodoo who will be making a pilgrimage from South Florida to Plaine-du-Nord in Haiti in late July are making offerings to the spirits in preparation for the annual festival.

     

    Follow this story


              Senior Finance and Operations Director – Cap Haitien, Haiti - Winrock International - Little Rock, AR   
    Forestry and Natural Resource Management Group. The project will directly support and contribute to the Government of Haiti (GOH)-led efforts to manage healthy...
    From Winrock International - Tue, 30 May 2017 11:30:38 GMT - View all Little Rock, AR jobs
              Gender Specialist - Cap Haitien, Haiti - Winrock International - Little Rock, AR   
    Forestry and Natural Resource Management Group. The project will directly support and contribute to the Government of Haiti (GOH)-led efforts to manage healthy...
    From Winrock International - Tue, 30 May 2017 11:30:36 GMT - View all Little Rock, AR jobs
              What I've Been Reading Lately   
    If you don't follow me on Litsy, here's a round up of my February reads (so far)! It was a pleasant mix of new releases and books I've been meaning to read for literal years, so all in all, a good month!

    Written in the Stars by Aisha Saeed

    This book has such a compelling premise: Naila is a Pakistani-American teen who follows her parents rules and wishes in all things, except one--she's got a secret boyfriend, also Pakistani-American, named Saif. But Naila's parents don't approve, and when they find out about Saif they whisk Naila away to Pakistan to visit family for the summer. The stakes ratchet up when her parents force Naila into an arranged marriage, and she faces the possibility of being trapped in her new husband's house for the rest of her life. Whether or not Naila will risk everything--even her life--to escape is the driving force behind this tense story. I felt like I was going into a family drama about the crossroads between cultures and halfway through stumbled into a thriller, but despite the tone switch I was totally and completely into this book! I read about two hours past my bedtime and didn't even realize it, that's how caught up in Naila's fate I was!

    Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson

    This is perhaps one of the most tightly plotted thrillers I've read in ages, and I haven't read an unreliable narrator so twisty since Merricat of We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Mary B. Addison allegedly killed a baby when she was nine, spent some time in prison, and now lives in a volatile group home. At sixteen, she's pregnant and much smarter than anyone gives her credit for. Motivated by a desire to keep her baby, Mary reluctantly re-opens her case in an attempt to prove once and for all that she didn't kill that baby--but that means revisiting that night, her relationship with her mother, and the hazy chain of events that led to her imprisonment. The pace is unrelenting and the timelines are twisty, but the story is put together so cleverly that I was tempted to re-read it from the very beginning only moments after finishing.

    Reader, I Married Him, edited by Tracy Chevalier

    I am a huge sucker for anything Jane Eyre, so I was slightly disappointed to find that these stories aren't necessarily inspired by that resilient heroine we all know and love, but by her iconic line "Reader, I married him." As a result, this collection of short stories was a little light on Jane inspiration, but heavy on relationship stories! It was worth procuring for the Emma Donoghue story alone, and it was delightful to read more of Patricia Park's writing (her novel Re Jane is excellent and a straight up retelling of JE, with Jane as a Korean American, living with her immigrant family in Queens!). Alas, this book is like most short story collections--a mixed bag of varying quality with some utterly forgettable pieces and a few good eggs. Oh, and there's a Lionel Shriver story in here and I didn't want to like it, but reader, I liked it. 

    Also, since we brought up Jane Eyre, Ruth Wilson in the BBC miniseries is the best Jane ever. Fight me.

    10 Things I Can See From Here by Carrie Mac

    Sixteen-year-old Maeve suffers from severe anxiety that sometimes impairs her function, and never abates. The first fifteen pages or so just chronicle her every anxiety as she makes the trip from Seattle to Vancouver to live with her dad for six months while her mom volunteers in Haiti, and I worried that I wouldn't be able to handle an entire novel of her relentless anxious worries. But Mac quickly balances out Maeve's intense inner thoughts with outer actions and events, and Maeve's self awareness and humor offers some relief from the somewhat claustrophobic nature of anxiety. I wrote more the book when I interviewed Carrie Mac last week. Overall, I thought this was a wonderful book about complicated families and anxiety and falling in love for the first time!

    Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living, edited by Manjula Martin

    This collection of essays and interviews with a variety of writers on writing and money was illuminating, oftentimes humorous, occasionally depressing, and expansive. I so appreciate these writers' candor and Martin's bravery in tackling a very personal and multi-faceted subject. While its appeal to writers is obvious, I think that this book is important for anyone who loves books and literature and wants to better understand how they are made and processed, and how writers live.

    We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

    I'm a huge Nina LaCour fan, but even if that weren't already the case this slim book would've completely blown me away. Marin is a college freshman who is staying at school in New York for winter break, hiding from the tragedy that occurred over the summer. Mabel is her best friend from San Francisco, come to visit in an attempt to repair their broken relationship. The book unfolds in present and past tense, and slowly builds up to the explosive moment that sent Marin running. The language is lovely and intense, and while the plot isn't punchy, the quiet moments sit with you for a long while. The beauty of this story is found as Marin ever so slowly realizes that she is not alone, and she is going to be okay.

    Jamaica Inn by Daphne DuMaurier

    As a young teen, I loved Rebecca with such an intensity that I didn't even bother to seek out any of DuMaurier's other novels. Therefore, I am not ashamed to admit that what drove me to finally picking this up was discovering that Lady Sybil plays Mary Yellan in the 2014 BBC miniseries adaptation. Sold. DuMaurier's historical novel about the sordid history of Jamaica Inn and the smugglers who lived there is told from the perspective of Mary Yellan, a young woman who travels there to seek out her only remaining relative, Aunt Patience. Patience is married to a brute of a man and Mary quickly realizes that Jamaica Inn harbors terrible secrets. She stays in an attempt to rescue Patience, but finds herself quickly sucked into the mystery of the place and strange appeal of her uncle younger brother, Jem. Du Maurier has the maddening habit of writing over the racier aspects (basically all the kissing scenes and the actual murder-y bits), but nevertheless Jamaica Inn is a riveting and suspenseful mystery. Plus, the miniseries was gorgeous.

    American Street by Ibi Zoboi

    Fabiola and her mother come from Port-au-Prince, Haiti to Detroit in the hope of finding "une belle vie" with her mother's sister and daughters. But when her mother is detained by customs, Fabiola must go on to Detroit alone. Fabiola struggles to learn a new culture, navigates complicated family dynamics, experiences a surprising romance, and discovers a dangerous situation, all while striving to live life on her own terms, within her belief system. Her voice is compelling, and the flavors of magical realism throughout the story are beautifully rendered. Ibi's writing is exquisite, through every heartbreak and triumph. 

    I'm currently reading Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon (I know, like two years late), and I've got an enticing stack of spring and summer ARCs that I'll be working my way through after that! Plus, March may finally be the month I actually read And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie because, um, the BBC miniseries looks good. I spent a lot of time talking about BBC miniseries this month, huh? What can I say, the world is terrible and they bring me joy. Even (especially?) when they're murderous.



              Q&A with Carrie Mac, Author of 10 Things I Can See From Here   
    One of the books I was most excited to get my hands on this month was an ARC of Carrie Mac's 10 Things I Can See From Here, a contemporary YA about Maeve, a girl dealing with severe anxiety. When her mom goes to Haiti for six months, Maeve is off to Vancouver to live with her dad, pregnant stepmom, and twin brothers. For Maeve, nearly every moment is wrought with fear and constant worry that she can't ever turn off, so when her dad starts messing up his sobriety and her stepmom wants to have a home birth and her little brothers are running wild, Maeve has no idea what to do. Then she meets Salix, a violinist who doesn't seem to be afraid of anything. Salix is cool and brave and she likes Maeve a lot, but having a girlfriend means that Maeve has to reveal just how crippling her anxiety can be--and somehow find a way to live with it.

    I loved this book a lot--it's funny and upbeat, and the humor balances out the seriousness of Maeve's anxiety and her fear that her family may be falling apart. The story is both romantic and nuanced, and I liked that Mac shows that falling in love with Salix isn't a cure for Maeve's anxiety, but rather Salix is able to help Maeve make room in her life for it, and figure out ways to better manage it.

    To celebrate the release, Carrie Mac was kind enough to answer a few of my questions!

    TCR: I love how you cut through the more serious angst and emotional trauma that Maeve experiences with slices of humor. The obituaries were some of my favorite parts. How did those develop during the drafting process?

    CM: I love obituaries. Ever since I was a little kid, I’ve turned to them first in any newspaper. When I was a paramedic I always looked for obituaries for patients who died on my watch or were sure to shortly after.

    I read obituaries start to finish, tedious lists of family members and good deeds and charities included. I’m always drawn to the obituaries of younger people who died, and especially and quite morbidly, the ones for children or babies. After that, the ones I’m most interested in are from fatalities that show up in the news. I like to check the obituary against them and see if there is any mention of the suicide or murder or freak accident at work. It fascinates me when there isn’t.

    After that, I read all the elderly people’s obituaries and try to tease out something authentic from the carefully and respectfully composed words that condense a complex lifetime into a slim file of a few hundred words.

    Truth be told, I write imaginary obituaries in my head all the time. Doesn’t everybody? I gave that habit to Maeve, because it is exactly something she would do.

    TCR: What was the most challenging aspect to writing this book? The easiest?

    CM: 10 Things needed to be the right balance between Maeve’s often crippling anxiety and the world outside of her. In various drafts, the scales would tip one way or the other, which was great because I got to know more about either her internal life or the ‘real’ world.’ I needed both those things—more of Maeve so that I could understand her better, but more of her world so that I could build it accurately and bring it to life to be as vibrant and compelling as Maeve’s interior world. Thankfully I love writing my books over and over again, and with each revision, Maeve’s internal world and external world became more fully realized until they complimented each other perfectly. Balance achieved.

    Easiest? The twins. I love them. They were so easy to write that I had to cut out dozens of pages starring them because they don’t get to be my protagonists this time.

    TCR: The issue of time and money aside, if you could write a story about any secondary character from this book, which one would you choose?

    CM: Easy! The twins. Like I said above, I love them. And they were so easy to write. I’d love to write a middle grade series starring them and Gnomenville. Add a little magic realism to those kids and the possibilities would be endless. I want to read those books. I can’t stand it when I want to read a book that hasn’t been written.

    I would also like to read a book about Dan, Maeve’s neighbor. I think he’s a very interesting character and I’d like to know more about him and how he ended up living in a cabin in the woods wearing a unicorn footy-jammies to bed and raising chickens. And I’d like it to be a quirky love story, so he’d end up with a lovely boyfriend. So I’d have to write it if I want to read it. Not enough writing hours in a lifetime to get to all the books I want to write!

    10 Things I Can See From Here is out next week, February 28th!

              Haiti-Canada Municipal Cooperation Program - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Petit, QC   
    Particular emphasis is placed on the collection of autonomous revenue for the municipalities and federations, citizen involvement, effective service delivery,...
    From Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 20:07:18 GMT - View all Petit, QC jobs
              Decolonising Disaster Social Work: Environmental Justice and Community Participation   
    Abstract
    Human behaviour, particularly the neo-liberal economic system that values unlimited growth and unsustainable extraction of natural resources, is contributing to climate volatility and exacerbating disaster risk. As such, social workers are increasingly called to work in disaster settings across the globe and collaborate with many actors, such as faith-based humanitarian organisations. Unfortunately, disaster interventions may perpetuate the values and practices of neo-liberalism, colonialism and oppression without careful consideration and action. In this article, the author discusses the environmental causes and consequences of disasters in relation to risk and vulnerability, offering a brief case study of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. This is followed by a discussion of the importance of community participation for sustainable disaster recovery. The author concludes with some specific recommendations for decolonising disaster social work practice.

              Red River Radio What's Write for Me   
    Dellani and Christina are joined by authors Rick Sanders and Janet Kleinman. Janet is the author of FLIRTING WITH DISASTER WHEN LOVE AND NATURE COLLIDE; a romantic thriller that takes place in Haiti following the earthquake from which the country is yet to recover. It is in this environment that a widow, her first boyfriend turned gambler, an exiled politico and a retired senator on a presidential mission to see how American dollars are being used to help the homeless cross pathes in earthquake- ravaged Haiti, Also part of the fun is Eric Williams, author of Edric the Hatchling Gryphon. He has a surprise for us, so be sure to listen in! Join us while we chat about writing, illustrating and, perhaps, bizarre journeys! Who knows? At any rate, come laugh with us.
              Fund primary care in Haiti   
    World Bank study highlights investments in primary care should be the priority in Haiti’s healthcare service, rather than investing in
              World: Price Watch: May 2017 Prices (June 30, 2017)   
    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Chad, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Key Messages

    In West Africa, regional staple food production during the 2016/17 marketing year was well above average. International rice and wheat imports continue to support regional market supplies. Prices continued to increase seasonally in many areas in May with the onset of the lean season. Current market anomalies remain largely concentrated in the eastern marketing basin, including but not limited to: conflict-related market disruptions in the Lake Chad basin, localized above-average grain deficits in Niger, and the impacts of the continued depreciation of the Naira. In East Africa, staple food supplies remain tight and prices well above-average in South Sudan, Somalia, and Yemen. Markets remain severely disrupted by insecurity in Yemen and South Sudan. Import capacity in Yemen is uncertain, and food availability will likely remain constrained in the coming months. Uganda and Kenya are also facing below-average staple food supply and above-average and increasing prices following poor harvests. In Southern Africa, regional maize availability continued to improve in May with the progression of harvests from the 2016/17 production season. Regional maize production prospects for the current season are good with record-high harvests anticipated in South Africa. Maize prices declined sharply in most areas in May, and were below their respective 2016 levels in many areas. The exceptions to these trends are in Zambia, where prices remain above average. Low regional maize prices encouraged exports to East Africa and beyond. In Central America, staple food availability continued to decline following the end of the recent Postrera harvest and Apante harvest. Maize and bean prices were seasonally stable or decreasing across the region, with varied trends compared to average levels. In Haiti, local maize prices were firm while local black beans prices saw a modest increase from their April levels. Imported rice prices were stable as the Haitian gourde appreciated marginally against the U.S. dollar. Higher transportation costs will continue to place upward pressures on staple food prices in the coming months. Central Asia sustained adequate supplies. Wheat prices remained stable in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Afghanistan, but started to decline in Pakistan with the arrival of the new harvest. Rice prices in Pakistan increased following larger export demand, affecting also rice prices in Afghanistan. Intraregional trade is expected to fill staples’ deficits on importing countries. International staple food markets remain well supplied. Maize prices fell, soybean prices rose while rice and wheat prices were mixed. Crude oil prices fell and remain well below average.


                  
    @Regrann from @innervisiontv - July 3rd @dawgmanent @migos @itshaitianfresh will be making history .... all my zoes and sanzaves and all the real fans will be there to make history ... told y'all #sanzave number #1 in the world .. ... no other option we comin #mennanboudawwwwwwwww 🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🇭🇹🌎💯💯💯🇭🇹go get ya tickets and get them early we making big announcement on the 3rd!!!!! - . . #vibes #music #unsignedartist #rapper #singer #songwriter #musiclover #musicjunkie #hiphop #rnb #soulmusic #musicislife #musicproducer #musician #studio #studiolife #upcomingartist #musicproduction #musicians #unsignedhype - #sweat #xxl #trapmusic #rnb #keys #producers #tunein #mixtape
              For Those Aboot to Rock: A Countdown to Canada Day. The Olde edition   

    Three years can seem like an eternity to even the most die hard doom fan, particular if your favourite band hasn’t deliver any riffs during that time.  Take the band Olde for example, after delivering their self-titled debut and garnering critical acclaim from the doom underground, fans have been clambering for  their crushing sonic blows. Fear not, because