Transfer of atomic mass with a photon solves the momentum paradox of light   
The propagation of light in a transparent medium is associated with the transfer of atomic mass density.

In a recent publication, Aalto University researchers show that in a transparent medium each photon is accompanied by an atomic mass density wave. The optical force of the photon sets the medium atoms in motion and makes them carry 92% of the total momentum of light, in the case of silicon.

The novel discovery solves the centennial momentum paradox of light. In the literature, there has existed two different values for the momentum of light in the transparent medium. Typically, these values differ by a factor of ten and this discrepancy is known as the momentum paradox of light. The difference between the momentum values is caused by neglecting the momentum of atoms moving with the light pulse.

To solve the momentum paradox the authors prove that the special theory of relativity requires an extra atomic density to travel with the photon. In related classical computer simulations, they use optical force field and Newton´s second law to show that a wave of increased atomic mass density is propagating through the medium with the light pulse.

The mass transfer leads to splitting of the total momentum of light into two components. The fields’ share of momentum is equal to the Abraham momentum while the total momentum, which includes also the momentum of atoms driven forward by the optical force, is equal to the Minkowski momentum.

”Since our work is theoretical and computational it must be still verified experimentally, before it can become a standard model of light in a transparent medium. Measuring the total momentum of a light pulse is not enough but one also has to measure the transferred atomic mass. This should be feasible using present interferometric and microscopic techniques and common photonic materials”, researcher Mikko Partanen says.

See the video: Photon mass drag and the momentum of light in a medium

Potential interstellar applications of the discovery

The researchers are working on potential optomechanical applications enabled by the optical shock wave of atoms predicted by the new theory. However, the theory applies not only to transparent liquids and solids but also to dilute interstellar gas. Using a simple kinematic consideration it can be shown that the energy loss caused by the mass transfer effect becomes for dilute interstellar gas proportional to the photon energy and distance travelled by light.

“This prompts for further simulations with realistic parameters for interstellar gas density, plasma properties and temperature. Presently the Hubble’s law is explained by Doppler shift being larger from distant stars. This effectively supports the hypothesis of expanding universe. In the mass polariton theory of light this hypothesis is not needed since redshift becomes automatically proportional to the distance from the star to the observer”, explains Professor Jukka Tulkki.

Research article: Mikko Partanen, Teppo Häyrynen, Jani Oksanen, and Jukka Tulkki. Photon mass drag and the momentum of light in a medium. Physical Review A 95. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.063850

More information:

Mikko Partanen
Doctoral Candidate
Aalto University
mikko.p.partanen@aalto.fi

Jukka Tulkki
Professor
Aalto University
jukka.tulkki@aalto.fi
tel. +358 50 520 4360


          Spatio-temporal mapping of plate boundary faults in California using geodetic imaging   

The Pacific–North American plate boundary in California is composed of a 400-km-wide network of faults and zones of distributed deformation. Earthquakes, even large ones, can occur along individual or combinations of faults within the larger plate boundary system. While research often focuses on the primary and secondary faults, holistic study of the plate boundary is required to answer several fundamental questions. How do plate boundary motions partition across California faults? How do faults within the plate boundary interact during earthquakes? What fraction of strain accumulation is relieved aseismically and does this provide limits on fault rupture propagation? Geodetic imaging, broadly defined as measurement of crustal deformation and topography of the Earth’s surface, enables assessment of topographic characteristics and the spatio-temporal behavior of the Earth’s crust. We focus here on crustal deformation observed with continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) from NASA’s airborne UAVSAR platform, and on high-resolution topography acquired from lidar and Structure from Motion (SfM) methods. Combined, these measurements are used to identify active structures, past ruptures, transient motions, and distribution of deformation. The observations inform estimates of the mechanical and geometric properties of faults. We discuss five areas in California as examples of different fault behavior, fault maturity and times within the earthquake cycle: the M6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake rupture, the San Jacinto fault, the creeping and locked Carrizo sections of the San Andreas fault, the Landers rupture in the Eastern California Shear Zone, and the convergence of the Eastern California Shear Zone and San Andreas fault in southern California. These examples indicate that distribution of crustal deformation can be measured using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and high-resolution topography and can improve our understanding of tectonic deformation and rupture characteristics within the broad plate boundary zone.


          'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions   

A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions. Using a technique called 'seismic noise interferometry' combined with geophysical measurements, the researchers measured the energy moving through a volcano.


          Interferenz   
Der Durchmesser feiner Drähte lässt sich interferometrisch beispielsweise wie ...
          Conference gives undergraduate women skills, inspiration to pursue physics careers   

Meg Urry was the first tenured woman professor in the Physics Department at Yale University and was often the only woman in her physics classes, including her graduate class at MIT, but she still heard a fellow student complain that women were unfairly given advantages over their male colleagues. “That’s when I realized there was something fishy going on,” she said.

Urry spoke at the 2017 APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP) Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference at Princeton University. She told students that she is still often the only woman in the room even though her department now has six out of 32 female faculty members – the highest number of the top 50 physics departments in the U.S. “That’s crazy, right?” Urry said. “If we were offered the same opportunities and had the same treatment, women would be half the faculty in every subject.”

Urry, a professor of astrophysics at Yale whose research focuses on active galaxies that host supermassive black holes in their centers was one of the plenary speakers at the conference, which focused on giving young women the tools to stay in physics and other STEM fields. More than 200 women attended Jan. 13 to Jan. 15 at Princeton University.

Addressing unconscious bias

Urry noted that the percentage of women in the U.S. graduating from college with physics degrees has remained flat at 20 percent for the past decade. Women in physics and other fields are affected by unconscious bias, Urry said. She cited one study that found participants who were given the resumes of equally qualified men and women were more likely to pick resumes with men’s names on them.

The Princeton CUWiP Conference was one of nine conferences nationwide and one in Canada that took place simultaneously. Other host institutions included Harvard University, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and the University of California, Los Angeles. The conference was offered free aside from a $45 registration fee and travel expenses. It was funded by the DOE’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation through grants to the American Physical Society.

Shannon Swilley Greco, a Science Education program leader at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), organized the conference with Lyman Page, chair of the University’s Physics Department, and graduate student Laura Chang. Greco told the young physicists that she hopes the conference will inspire them to stay in a physics or STEM field. “I don’t ever want anyone to leave the field they loved because they felt ill-prepared,” she told the young physicists, “or because they just had so much doubt that they were afraid they weren’t where they were supposed to be, or that they were made to feel unwelcome or uncomfortable.” 

The conference kicked off on Friday, Jan. 13, with a tour of University research laboratories, including the Andlinger Center, Geosciences, and PPPL. More than 60 people attended the PPPL tour, which visited PPPL’s National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade test cell and control room. “I love it!” said Bernadette Haig, a student at Fordham University. “This is new stuff for me, so it’s really cool!”

“Don’t get discouraged”

Women on a career panel made up of women at Google, Solvay, and Princeton and Rowan universities, advised the young women to be persistent. “The golden rule is don’t get discouraged,” said Katerina Visnjic, a senior lecturer in the Princeton Physics Department, who is redesigning the introductory physics curriculum. “When you see scientific results presented, that is the last 1 percent of the work that went into that. It doesn’t reflect the 99 percent that didn’t work.”

The conference offered a variety of workshops on topics from “Mental health,” and “Out in STEM,” to “Negotiation and other professional skills.” In the workshop on “Combatting imposter syndrome & bias and developing a growth mindset,” David Yaeger, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Texas, Austin, said intelligence is just one factor that predicts an individual’s success. “Intelligence itself is malleable especially in your developing stage,” Yaeger added. “Every time you do a hard mathematical proof, your brain actually changes.”

The “How to be an ally” workshop focused on how to be an ally to under-represented groups. “If you have privilege, use that privilege,” said Geraldine Cochran, dean of the Douglass Project for Rutgers Women in STEM. “If you are only looking at job candidates who have graduate degrees from Harvard and Princeton, why not look at people who did really well but have not gone to undergraduate institutions like that?”

Developing a work-life plan

Students attending a workshop on work-life balance were encouraged to think about developing a work-life plan that builds in time for outside activities and simply having fun. “How are you going to find ways to motivate yourself that help you feel fulfilled? And what is a full life apart from what you imagined a successful life is?” asked Amada Sandoval, director of the Princeton University Women’s Center.

Nergis Mavalvala, a physics professor known for her role in the confirmation of gravitational waves at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, broadcast her keynote speech from Harvard, with all 10 conferences broadcasting video greetings from their audiences. (The Princeton group did a wave).

Among numerous “Hot Topics in Physics” speakers was Fatima Ebrahimi, a PPPL physicist, who discussed her research studying a phenomenon in magnetic reconnection that could be used to start fusion devices called tokamaks and might also yield insights into magnetic reconnection, the process that triggers solar flames, the Northern Lights, and other astrophysical phenomena. “If you know plasma physics, there’s no boundary,” Ebrahimi told students. “You can do detailed analysis in the lab but then you can move on and answer fundamental questions in astrophysics.”

Several students presented their research in a poster session at the end of the day on Jan. 14. On Jan. 15, the final day of the conference, Katja Nowack, an experimental condensed matter physicist at Cornell University, discussed her research. The conference concluded with a Career and Research Expo at the Frick Chemistry Laboratory Building.

CUWiP Plus at PPPL

A group of about 20 students attended a CUWiP Plus session at PPPL, where they spent Sunday afternoon and Monday morning learning about plasma physics led by physicist Arturo Dominguez, Science Education senior program leader. A second group entitled, "Physics on All Scales," learned about astrophysics through a giant radio antenna and a trip on Sunday to the Princeton University Imaging and Analysis Center.  

Participants in the conference said they enjoyed meeting other female physicists. “I wanted to come to the conference because there are only eight women in my year in physics,” said Katherine Guido, a student at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. “I thought it would be really cool to talk to other women physicists.”  

“I think it’s amazing.” said Jessica Irving, an associate professor in the University’s Geosciences Department. “I’ve never been to a meeting like this before – a meeting full of women who are excited about science.”

PPPL, on Princeton University's Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro, N.J., is devoted to creating new knowledge about the physics of plasmas — ultra-hot, charged gases — and to developing practical solutions for the creation of fusion energy. The Laboratory is managed by the University for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, which is the largest single supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

Spotlight: 
Headline: 
Conference gives undergraduate women skills, inspiration to pursue physics careers

          Optical biosensors.   
Related Articles

Optical biosensors.

Essays Biochem. 2016 Jun 30;60(1):91-100

Authors: Damborský P, Švitel J, Katrlík J

Abstract
Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells.

PMID: 27365039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


          Nuit Blanche in Review (June 2017)   

Since the last Nuit Blanche in Review (May 2017) we've had three implementations related to Deep Neural Networks, a few in-depth post ranging from training nets to compressive sensing,  a dataset, two Paris Machine Learning meetups, one meeting announcement, several videos of talks and four job announcements. Enjoy !

Implementations

In depth

Book
Dataset

Paris Machine Learning meetup

Meeting
slides

Videos

Job:






Join the CompressiveSensing subreddit or the Google+ Community or the Facebook page and post there !
Liked this entry ? subscribe to Nuit Blanche's feed, there's more where that came from. You can also subscribe to Nuit Blanche by Email, explore the Big Picture in Compressive Sensing or the Matrix Factorization Jungle and join the conversations on compressive sensing, advanced matrix factorization and calibration issues on Linkedin.

          Nuit Blanche in Review (June 2017)   

Since the last Nuit Blanche in Review (May 2017) we've had three implementations related to Deep Neural Networks, a few in-depth post ranging from training nets to compressive sensing,  a dataset, two Paris Machine Learning meetups, one meeting announcement, several videos of talks and four job announcements. Enjoy !

Implementations

In depth

Book
Dataset

Paris Machine Learning meetup

Meeting
slides

Videos

Job:






Join the CompressiveSensing subreddit or the Google+ Community or the Facebook page and post there !
Liked this entry ? subscribe to Nuit Blanche's feed, there's more where that came from. You can also subscribe to Nuit Blanche by Email, explore the Big Picture in Compressive Sensing or the Matrix Factorization Jungle and join the conversations on compressive sensing, advanced matrix factorization and calibration issues on Linkedin.

          Older FOSS News (Catchup)   
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  • [Older] What is Open Source?

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  • [Older] Open Source Lab at VVCE
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    [...]

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  • [Older] Oracle delays Java 9, modularity issues blamed

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  • [Older] How open-sourcing your code base can kickstart growth

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  • [Older] Benefits of an open source approach to IoT application enablement [Ed: No, proprietary and commercial are not the same thing]

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  • [Older] The Great OpenStack Delusion – how open source cloud infrastructure can overcome a crisis

    Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth delivers some tough love in his assessment of OpenStack and what needs to happen to get it out of a crisis.

  • [Older] The evolution of OpenStack: Where next for the open source cloud platform?

    In the case of OpenStack, and its pool of contributors and supplier partners, any hint of a company opting to downsize their involvement is often seized upon by industry watchers as a sign the wheels are coming off the open source cloud juggernaut.

  • [Older] As open-source adoption skyrockets in enterprise, Linux addresses ease of use

    Joshipura explained how discriminating the organization is with each project it works on. From setting up the requirements to the architecture, Linux provides an explicit definition of the end user’s use case to the community. Linux facilitates the design work, architectural leadership, inter-project cross-leadership in an actively managed, sustainable ecosystem.

  • [Older] Spinnaker, an open-source project for continuous delivery, hits the 1.0 milestone

    Google announced the 1.0 release of Spinnaker, which was originally developed inside Netflix and enhanced by Google and a few other companies. The software is used by companies like Target and Cloudera to enable continuous delivery, a modern software development concept that holds application updates should be delivered when they are ready, instead of on a fixed schedule.

  • [Older] Chef Automate for application automation in cloud-native container-first
  • [Older] Chef tightens the links between Chef Automate and its open-source DevOps products
  • Second update from summer training 2017

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  • openbsd changes of note 624
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  • [Older] PrismTech Announces Availability of Open Source DDS Community Edition v6.7 Software
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    Việt Nam will soon have its own "Wikipedia" page, maybe even more interactive, developed by Vietnamese people for Vietnamese people.

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  • [Older] Open source textbooks help keep college affordable

    Keeping college education affordable is a guiding principle at Dalton State College, and one key way faculty members contribute is by collaborating to create open educational resources for their students, allowing them to avoid buying costly textbooks for some classes.

  • Launch Of Open Access Book On Geographical Indications In Asia-Pacific

    A new book launched this week in Geneva offers a unique compilation of the challenges and promises of the protection of geographical indications (GIs) with a particular focus on countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

    We should “not romanticise GIs,” but we need to be “very pragmatic and practical” and “a bit more sceptical,” Irene Calboli, professor at the Management University of Singapore, said at the launch.

    Calboli presented on 27 June the launch of the book Geographical Indications at the Crossroads of Trade, Development, and Culture. Focus on Asia-Pacific at the World Trade Organization. The book, co-edited by Calboli and Wee Loong Ng-Loy, professor at the National University of Singapore, is available by open access, as a contribution to the global body of knowledge on the subject.

  • [Older] Sweet dreams: Eclipse creates IoT Open Testbeds

    Open source software lifecycle group the Eclipse Foundation has laid down additional cornerstones that it is hoping will bring more unity and compatibility to the IoT.

  • SDL2 Brought To QNX 7.0

    For fans of the QNX operating system, SDL2 mainline can now run on QNX 7.0.

    There's been past QNX + SDL work while now the latest mainline SDL2 code can work with QNX 7.0, which was released by BlackBerry earlier this year. The support landed this weekend in the Simple DirectMedia Layer with this Git commit.


          A publication database for optical long baseline interferometry   
Дата и время публикации : 2010-07-29T16:48:08Z Авторы публикации и институты : Fabien Malbet Guillaume Mella Peter Lawson Esther Taillifet Sylvain Lafrasse Ссылка на журнал-издание: Ссылка на журнал-издание не найденаКоментарии к cтатье: To be published in the SPIE’2010 conference on “Optical and Infrared Interferometry II”Первичная категория: astro-ph.IM Все категории : astro-ph.IM Краткий обзор статьи: Optical long [...]
          Comment on A Response to “On the time lags of the LIGO signals” (Guest Post) by Universe is Flat   
We need something like a VLA of sensitive gravity wave interferometers to pinpoint the location of black holes. That would allow us to do traditional optical and radio astronomy as well in order to nail down the mass of the new more massive black hole and satisfy the critics.
          'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions   
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions. Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii [Credit: Clare Donaldson]Using a technique called 'seismic noise interferometry' combined with geophysical measurements, the researchers measured the energy moving through a volcano. They found that there is a good...

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          Improvement of training set structure in fusion data cleaning using Time-Domain Global Similarity method. (arXiv:1706.10018v1 [cs.LG])   

Authors: Jian Liu, Ting Lan, Hong Qin

Traditional data cleaning identifies dirty data by classifying original data sequences, which is a class$-$imbalanced problem since the proportion of incorrect data is much less than the proportion of correct ones for most diagnostic systems in Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) devices. When using machine learning algorithms to classify diagnostic data based on class$-$imbalanced training set, most classifiers are biased towards the major class and show very poor classification rates on the minor class. By transforming the direct classification problem about original data sequences into a classification problem about the physical similarity between data sequences, the class$-$balanced effect of Time$-$Domain Global Similarity (TDGS) method on training set structure is investigated in this paper. Meanwhile, the impact of improved training set structure on data cleaning performance of TDGS method is demonstrated with an application example in EAST POlarimetry$-$INTerferometry (POINT) system.


          Signal Reconstruction from Interferometric Measurements under Sensing Constraints. (arXiv:1706.10275v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Davood Mardani, George K. Atia, Ayman F. Abouraddy

This paper develops a unifying framework for signal reconstruction from interferometric measurements that is broadly applicable to various applications of interferometry. In this framework, the problem of signal reconstruction in interferometry amounts to one of basis analysis. Its applicability is shown to extend beyond conventional temporal interferometry, which leverages the relative delay between the two arms of an interferometer, to arbitrary degrees of freedom of the input signal. This allows for reconstruction of signals supported in other domains (e.g., spatial) with no modification to the underlying structure except for replacing the standard temporal delay with a generalized delay, that is, a practically realizable unitary transformation for which the basis elements are eigenfunctions. Under the proposed model, the interferometric measurements are shown to be linear in the basis coefficients, thereby enabling efficient and fast recovery of the desired information. While the corresponding linear transformation has only a limited number of degrees of freedom set by the structure of the interferometer giving rise to a highly constrained sensing structure, we show that the problem of signal recovery from such measurements can still be carried out compressively. This signifies significant reduction in sample complexity without introducing any additional randomization as is typically done in prior work leveraging compressive sensing techniques. We provide performance guarantees under constrained sensing by proving that the transformation satisfies sufficient conditions for successful reconstruction of sparse signals using concentration arguments. We showcase the effectiveness of the proposed approach using simulation results, as well as actual experimental results in the context of optical modal analysis of spatial beams.


          Comment on A Response to “On the time lags of the LIGO signals” (Guest Post) by Universe is Flat   
We need something like a VLA of sensitive gravity wave interferometers to pinpoint the location of black holes. That would allow us to do traditional optical and radio astronomy as well in order to nail down the mass of the new more massive black hole and satisfy the critics.
          The 2008-2009 outburst of the young binary system Z CMa unraveled by interferometry with high spectral resolution   
Дата и время публикации : 2010-07-30T07:42:05Z Авторы публикации и институты : Fabien Malbet Myriam Benisty Catherine Dougados Antonella Natta Jean-Baptiste Le Bouquin Fabrizio Massi Jérôme Bouvier Konstantin Grankin Mickael Bonnefoy Emma Whelan Ссылка на журнал-издание: Ссылка на журнал-издание не найденаКоментарии к cтатье: To be published in the proceedings of the SPIE’2010 conference on “Optical and [...]
          Il Blues dei Buchi Neri   

Una nuova scoperta, anticipata dal grande Einstein e che oggi incontra reali riscontri.

Da quando nel 1916 Einstein predisse l'esistenza delle onde gravitazionali minuscole increspature nello spaziotempo generate da eventi insondabili, la scienza si è preoccupata di indagare se tali vibrazioni possano essere registrate.

Perché, in questo caso, potremmo osservare il nostro universo attraverso il suono: il "sibilo" del Big Bang, il "canto" simile a quello delle balene delle supernovae che esplodono, le "vibrazioni" prodotte dalla collisione di due buchi neri.

Il 14 settembre 2015 la previsione di Einstein ha ricevuto una clamorosa conferma: per la prima volta due interferometri del progetto statunitense LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) hanno rivelato gli effetti di una potentissima collisione di due buchi neri avvenuta 1,3 miliardi di anni fa, e che è stata percepita sulla Terra come un lieve "tremore".

Ma forte abbastanza da provocare un vero e proprio terremoto nel campo della astrofisica.

«Questo libro» scrive l'autrice «è una cronaca delle onde gravitazionaliuna registrazione acustica della storia dell'universo, una colonna sonora che accompagna il film muto dell'astronomia – e al tempo stesso un tributo a un'impresa sperimentale donchisciottesca, epica, lacerante, un tributo a un'ambizione da folli.»


          Tessutino Takionic   

I tessuti, costituiti da speciali fibre ORM di alta tecnologia, si applicano sulle zone doloranti per alleviare il dolore e favorire il recupero.

Utili contro strappi, distorsioni, tendiniti, problemi ai legamenti, problemi osteoarticolari e lombari.

Aiutano a ricostruire un muscolo sfibrato e ad assorbire edemi post-operatori.

I tessuti sono molto usati dai terapisti e dagli agopuntori.

Sono eccellenti come coadiuvante in sciatalgie, sacralgie, mialgie, ernia del disco, cifosi.

Migliorano la forza muscolare e la flessibilità corporea, riequilibrano gli emisferi cerebrali (lo stress è dovuto al loro equilibrio), fanno aumentare l'attività delle onde Alfa, Delta e Theta, favorendo così la concentrazione, la memoria e il rilassamento.

Le prove eseguite con termografia dimostrano che i tessuti, in pochi minuti, favoriscono la microcircolazione e, secondo i risultati ottenuti dalle prove eseguite con fotocamera a largo spettro UVIR FUJI PRO con FILTRO TUNABLE VARISPEC, favoriscono rapidamente l'ossigenazione del sangue.

I tessuti Takionic® non perdono l'efficacia nel tempo. Sono lavabili a mano con acqua tiepida e sapone neutro. Non vanno stirati.

TESSUTO COMPOSTO DA MINERALI PIEZOELETTRICI

Il composto di minerali piezoelettrici è un materiale costituito da una polvere di minerali, come quarzo bianco, mica, plagioclasio, tormalina, polverizzati a 0.3 micron.

Questa miscela di minerali piezoelettrici è caratterizzata dalla facoltà di emettere campi elettromagnetici a bassissima frequenza che sono in grado di "riequilibrare" la frequenza emessa dalle singole parti (cellule, tessuti) dell'organismo umano, animale e vegetale, così da ripristinare il benessere energetico compromesso dalle fonti di inquinamento.

I Tachioni potenziano le onde alfa, delta e theta

Jack Stucki, in un esperimento in cui ha visto che le lenti tachionizzate creavano un aumento dell’attività alfa ai due volontari ha constatato anche un significativo potenziamento delle loro onde delta e theta dimostrando così lo straordinario effetto che l’energia tachionica ha sul cervello.

I materiali tachionici non si limitano a collegare i campi di energia organizzativa, ma accrescono il nostro potenziale e rimettono in funzione le parti inattive del cervello.

Il ricercatore R. Zamperini ha constatato che durante lo stato alfa c’è un incremento di energia in tutti gli organi della digestione e dell’assimilazione, un aumento dell’energia dello stomaco, del fegato, della cistifelia, dell’intestino tenue e crasso, nel pancreas.

Durante lo stato alfa si prova un maggior rilassamento muscolare, perché i muscoli e i vasi sanguigni si distendono ed anche la circolazione ed il tessuto connettivo migliora e c’è un aumento della microcircolazione.

Lo stato alfa potenzia il sistema parasimpatico (la branca del sistema nervoso connessa al rilassamento) così che si è meno consapevoli dello scorrere del tempo, la consapevolezza di sposta dalla realtà esterna verso l’interno, verso il proprio corpo, i pensieri sembrano rallentare e l’ansia è mitigata perché ci rilassiamo mentalmente.

Quando una persona è in uno stato theta (meditazione profonda) si attivano il timo, il midollo osseo rosso (quello dell’omopoiesi, la fabbricazione delle cellule del sangue) e il sistema immunitario.

Inoltre nello stato theta si ha: accesso al proprio materiale inconscio, associazione libera, idee creative, sogni lucidi, ricordo facilitato dei sogni, efficacia delle visualizzazioni, apprendimento facilitato, accettazione delle novità.

Secondo Elmer e Alyce Green, due ricercatori degli Stati Uniti, la pratica delle onde theta sembra essere connessa ad una buona salute e ad una profonda trasformazione personale.

Le onde theta sembrano siano anche la porta che apre le potenzialità ESP (extra sensorial perception, percezioni extra sensoriali).

Il chimico Lorenzo Acerra:

«I due emisferi, il destro, quello razionale conscio, e il sinistro, quello razionale e inconscio, lavorano in simbiosi come unico direttore dei due aspetti della nostra vita. Essi mantengono la salute in modo automatico e permettono la creatività spirituale e materiale, finalizzata alla migliore vita possibile, concretizzando il principio di autoconservazione.

La vibrazione corretta degli emisferi mantiene sano e attivo l’individuo, ma qualora uno dei due emisferi cambi frequenza, la alzi, l’abbassi o, peggio ancora, si sfasino entrambi, l’individuo entra in uno stato di stress».

L’attività equilibrata dei due emisferi cerebrali si chiama sincronia cerebrale ed è connessa a stati di grande creatività e benessere.

Durante i momenti di sintonia cerebrale noi produciamo energia di ordine superiore la quale agisce prevalentemente sui corpi sottili, che si decongestionano e si attivano.

L’allineamento dei due emisferi corrispondente all’utilizzazione del 100% del nostro cervello che così si trasforma in un ulteriore interferometro naturale capace di molti apparenti miracoli come la diagnosi sottile, la telepatia, la guarigione, la chiaroveggenza.

Quando i due emisferi lavorano in sincronia si potenziano l’uno con l’altro. In quei momenti cresce la creatività, si accede a stati di auto-guarigione sia fisica che psichica e ad una vera e propria riorganizzazione psichica con il superamento di antichi traumi, di fobie, dando alla nostra vita nuovi significati e più profonde motivazioni.

Il sig. Haffelder che dirige l’istituto per la comunicazione e la ricerca sul cervello a Stoccarda da vent’anni scrive:

«Un soggetto esaminato in posizione distesa con 5 dischi tachionizzati posti sui Chakra è stato sottoposto a stress mentale con una serie di domande molto difficili, tra cui dei quiz matematici a cui doveva rispondere verbalmente.

I risultati della prova dimostrano la grande capacità dei materiali tachionici di equilibrare gli emisferi destro e sinistro del cervello».

Haffelder non ha mai visto prima un cervello mantenere l’equilibrio durante un interrogatorio così serrato e difficile.

Egli è rimasto così colpito dai risultati ottenuti, da includere i materiali tachionizzati nei suoi seminari, nel corso dei quali insegna ai bambini come concentrarsi e rimanere bilanciati in difficili situazioni di stress.


          Signal Reconstruction from Interferometric Measurements under Sensing Constraints. (arXiv:1706.10275v1 [cs.IT])   

Authors: Davood Mardani, George K. Atia, Ayman F. Abouraddy

This paper develops a unifying framework for signal reconstruction from interferometric measurements that is broadly applicable to various applications of interferometry. In this framework, the problem of signal reconstruction in interferometry amounts to one of basis analysis. Its applicability is shown to extend beyond conventional temporal interferometry, which leverages the relative delay between the two arms of an interferometer, to arbitrary degrees of freedom of the input signal. This allows for reconstruction of signals supported in other domains (e.g., spatial) with no modification to the underlying structure except for replacing the standard temporal delay with a generalized delay, that is, a practically realizable unitary transformation for which the basis elements are eigenfunctions. Under the proposed model, the interferometric measurements are shown to be linear in the basis coefficients, thereby enabling efficient and fast recovery of the desired information. While the corresponding linear transformation has only a limited number of degrees of freedom set by the structure of the interferometer giving rise to a highly constrained sensing structure, we show that the problem of signal recovery from such measurements can still be carried out compressively. This signifies significant reduction in sample complexity without introducing any additional randomization as is typically done in prior work leveraging compressive sensing techniques. We provide performance guarantees under constrained sensing by proving that the transformation satisfies sufficient conditions for successful reconstruction of sparse signals using concentration arguments. We showcase the effectiveness of the proposed approach using simulation results, as well as actual experimental results in the context of optical modal analysis of spatial beams.